Arts & Culture

Eugene Redmond, Professor and Poet Laureate of East St. Louis
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

In the past year, St. Louis has been saturated by a groundswell of art related to social justice concerns, specifically issues of the region’s racial inequalities. For scholars, fans and former members of St. Louis’ Black Artists Group (BAG), the trend is remarkably familiar.

On Chess: St. Louis players raise money for ALS research

Sep 23, 2015
A tournament at the chess center raised almost $400 for ALS
Provided by the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

The Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis held its annual ALS Benefit Tournament last weekend to commemorate the life of Waldo Odak, a well-known member of the Chess Club. The entry fee and donations went to the St. Louis Regional Chapter of the ALS Association to support research and assist those afflicted with the neurological disease. The 19-player tournament raised an additional $390 toward ALS research.

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis family of Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra gathered Wednesday on the porch of his boyhood home on The Hill to mourn the passing of the 90-year-old baseball legend, who died on Tuesday.

“Last night was very sad. We had time to all talk to each other and to cry to each other and just to love and remember him before this craziness started today,’’ said Mary Frances Brown, Berra’s niece.

Baseball Legend Yogi Berra Dies At 90

Sep 23, 2015

Yogi Berra, known as much for his quotable malapropisms as for his baseball career, has died at his home in New Jersey, according to Dave Kaplan, director of the Yogi Berra Museum. The Hall of Famer was 90 years old.

Berra was a Yankee alongside fellow legends Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle from 1949 to 1965, helping the team win 10 World Series championships. He played in more World Series (14) than any other major leaguer and was named MVP three times.

Pope Francis at St. Peter's Square in May 2013
Wikipedia

Approximately 800 St. Louis Catholics on Saturday sang, played, prayed and had their photo taken with a life-size flat poster of a smiling Pope Francis at Papa-palooza on the Kenrick-Glennon Seminary grounds in Shrewsbury. The archdiocesan-wide, church picnic was aimed to give St. Louisans a family celebration in advance of the international Vatican's World Meeting of Families, which begins Tuesday in Philadelphia. 

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, September 20 will be “Compositions of Monk and Coltrane.”  This show focuses on the compositions of Monk and Coltrane interpreted by others.  We will feature the music of three classic albums: Thelonious Monk’s “Monk’s Music (1957),” 5 by Monk by 5 (1959) and John Coltrane’s “Crescent (1964).”  In addition, five other Coltrane compositions written from 1958-60 will be explored.  These musicians will include Dan Rubright, Steve Schenkel, the Monk’s Music Trio, the Bill Holman Big Band, Steve Lacy, Joe Lovano, James Carter, Karrin Allyson, Marty Ehrlich, Frank Morga

What is Punk? chronicles punk history for kids.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Eric Morse first heard the term “punk” as a child while listening to the radio with his parents during the Christmas holidays.  His response was instant.

“I remember saying’ I don’t know what punk is but I don’t like it’” said Morse.

Courtesy of the artist

Sure, you know La Vie en Rose. How could we not include the song that put the legendary French chanteuse Édith Piaf on the map? But do you know these others? Elsie Parker and Wayne Coniglio of Elsie Parker and the Poor People of Paris, a local band that specializes in popular French music and jazz, shared the backstories of three other Piaf songs you should know on Friday’s “Cityscape” with host Steve Potter. 

St. Louis Symphony music director David Robertson spoke about the 2015-16 season with "Cityscape" host Steve Potter.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

This season at the St. Louis Symphony, “music tells the stories,” said music director David Robertson.

Robertson joined “Cityscape” host Steve Potter to discuss the Symphony’s 136th season, which begins this weekend and runs through June of next year.

Marquise Knox at the Reykjavik Blues Festival in 2011
Olikristinn | Wikipedia

When the funk comes to St. Louis, it sounds a lot like the blues. The city is known for blues and jazz, not the classic funk sounds of James Brown and George Clinton. Art Dwyer plays with the Soulard Blues Band and says funk isn’t easily defined. For him funk is a visceral reaction.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

A group of performers from the Hindu Temple of St. Louis joined Batya Abramson-Goldstein, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, on “Cityscape” this Friday as part of preparations for this Sunday’s fifth annual Arts and Faith interfaith concert at the Sheldon, which promotes peace and unity in the region and around the world.

We had the pleasure to hear (and mic up!) nine of the Hindu Temple Choir performers live on air. The choir usually performs at full capacity with 18 members. 

Why put on another 9/11 concert? 'We need it.'

Sep 16, 2015
Paul Reuter - don't use larger than 300 px
Provided by the Sheldon

In 2011, a dedicated congregation of regional leaders representing arts and faith organizations gave life to a concert to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the World Trade Center tragedy. It is fast becoming a late-summer tradition.

That first Arts and Faith concert was a standing-room-only success -- it was also a soul-inspiring, deeply affecting success.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

When it comes to priorities, Marie-Hélène Bernard will not be easily swayed. When asked by “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh whether she prefers to open her first season as president of the St. Louis Symphony  or throw out the first pitch at a Cardinals game, she made it clear that it doesn’t matter what she’s doing so long as it is connecting the local community to the symphony.

“Both are so, so exciting … exciting in a way that gets me to know the community,” said Bernard. “It is a really wonderful city.”

St. Louis Poet Laureate Michael Castro delivers a poem before the ceremonial swearing-in of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

This weekend poetry becomes a test of whether poets and poetry enthusiasts who follow a certain genre can cross cultural and stylist barriers in their art. The Brick City Poetry Festival is being presented as the first poetry festival of its kind in the St. Louis region. The goal? To bring together academic, spoken-word, young, old, and racially diverse poets in search of “human commonality.”

Hozier Loufest 2015
Jess Luther | St. Louis Public Radio

According to festival organizers, LouFest this year brought a record number of music fans to the event in Forest Park. Promoters estimated attendance for the weekend at roughly 50,000 people. Last year attendance was roughly 36,000. Though attendance was high, people pointed out things they hope will change next year.

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, September 13 will be “The Music of Wayne Shorter.”  Over his 56-year career, saxophonist/composer Wayne Shorter has won ten Grammies and numerous other awards.  He is best known for his long tenures with Art Blakey, Miles Davis and Weather Report and has led many ensembles, most notably his “without a net” quartet with Danilo Perez.  In addition, we will hear him with Lee Morgan, Herbie Hancock and J.J.

Photo courtesy of the artist.

There’s no reason  for fans of the man who “defined cool” to be “Kind of Blue” this weekend as the Miles Davis Memorial project plans to unveil its sculpture of the renowned jazz musician in Alton.  A musical celebration that will put a swing in the step of local jazz aficionados will accompany the unveiling.

Justin Saffell and Matt Walters of Foeder Crafters of America
Ashley Gieseking | Sauce Magazine

Justin Saffell and Matt Walters are two newcomers on the vanguard of an old, old tradition: foeder-brewed beer.

Foeders (pronounced ‘fooders’) have been used in Belgium and elsewhere in Europe for centuries, said Catherine Klene, managing editor at Sauce Magazine, but Saffell and Walters claim to be the first—and only—all-American foeder-makers. They run Foeder Crafters of America, located in O’Fallon, Mo., and construct their foeders by hand—just the two of them.

Jerry Naunheim Jr

The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis’ “All the Way” opens Friday night and takes on subject matter from the 1960s that may seem just as pertinent in theaters today as it would have back then. The Rep’s 49th season opener focuses on the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson, one of the most controversial presidents in recent memory, as he navigates the civil rights era and the Vietnam War, mincing no words along the way. 

New jazz stream

Sep 11, 2015
Benny Carter playing saxophone
Dennis Owsley

St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU is pleased to announce the addition of jazz to its broadcast schedule. Beginning today, St. Louis Public Radio | Jazz 90.7 KWMU-2 will air jazz music 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.  Listeners can access the programming on their digital radios at 90.7 KWMU-2, online at www.stlpublicradio.org/jazz, and on all of their mobile devices, using the St.

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