Arts & Culture

Áine O'Connor

When mentioning author and philanthropist Cynthia Kagan Frohlichstein, the best word that comes to mind is “spunk.” You can spot her around town at different events, chatting and mingling, owning the crowd.

And frankly, she has much to celebrate.

Celebrating her 40th year of being cancer-free, Frohlichstein has not slowed down her attempts at showing the world that giving is as good as receiving. She’s written children’s books on the topic of “giving back” and life lessons in hopes that young people will carry the torch forward.

Bob Kramer Marionnettes
Alex Heuer

Over fifty years ago, a St. Louis-based company set out to keep age-old children’s stories alive, literally.

Bob Kramer’s Marionnettes” serves as one of the longest running puppetry theatres in the United States. Combining humor with storytelling, Kramer’s production pieces come to life to provide entertainment for audiences of all ages.

The ruin of the Becker Anthes house has presented a challenge that would-be restorationists have not yet met
Lisa LaRose

Rain is a beautiful act of nature. It brings nourishment to everything that it touches and creates flush, lustrous green forests and beautiful flowers. In the wake of such awe-inspiring beauty, it also creates hard work.

Since we received the call from the city that we would be able to purchase the stone house, we have learned just how much work in a short time a heavy rainfall could bring. In the spring, we had volunteers help us clear the brush and cut down trees that had overrun the property and help us haul limestone from a nearby construction site that had unearthed a limestone basement from an old structure long gone.

Kathryn Nahorski, Executive Director, St. Louis Artists' Guild
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

On the brink of its 130th anniversary, The Artists’ Guild, St. Louis’ longest running art organization, relocated to the old Famous-Barr building in downtown Clayton from its old Oak Knoll Park location.

Just a few weeks after the move, executive director Kathryn Nahorski has exciting plans for the organization.

This radiation warning sign is one of many posted on the chain link fence surrounding part of the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton, Mo.
Sarah Skiold-Hanlin | St. Louis Public Radio

This year, 26 St. Louis-produced films will appear alongside films from around the world at the St. Louis International Film Festival. The organization’s Artistic Director Chris Clark said quality, not just location, was the primary factor affecting what films would be included in the November programming.

“They are like top gun. They are the best of the best,” he said. “These are things that we would be proud to recommend and could stand toe to toe in other festivals anywhere.”

"The Next Great Burger"
Courtesy of Coolfire Studios

Coolfire Studios, best known for their local production of “Welcome to Sweetie Pies,” embarked on a new project to boost their place in brand entertainment.

On July 21, the Esquire Network premiered Coolfire’s newest production “The Next Great Burger.” In association with Budweiser, the competition show seeks to discover the best burger chef in the country.

NPR website

Tune in to St. Louis Public Radio at noon Saturday to hear the Ask Me Another show recorded at the Pageant in April.

You can hear Ophira Eisenberg make the obvious discovery that people in St. Louis smile more than they do in New York. The show’s local VIP is novelist Curtis Sittenfeld, the acclaimed author of “Prep,” “American Wife,” “Sisterland” and more. The last of those is set in the St. Louis area, where Sittenfeld has lived since 2007.

Veronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

Tap takeovers, National Mead Day, beer and cheese, beer and brats, beer and chocolate, dim sum and beer, yoga and beer, burgers and beer, art and beer, popcorn and beer, and beer artfully paired with only the finest varieties of Doritos: Surely in all of this there must be music.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, July 26 will be “The Norman Granz Labels-Part 2.”  Entrepreneur-Promoter Norman Granz founded the Clef, Norgran,Verve and Pablo record labels.  After Granz sold Verve, the label has become a powerhouse, recording many styles of jazz with such artists as Gerry Mulligan, Charlie Ventura, Oscar Peterson, Count Basie, Sarah Vaughan, Zoot Sims, Coleman Hawkins, Roy Eldridge, Johnny Hodges, Charlie Haden, Gil Evans, Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter and others.

The Slide Show contains my photographs of some of the artists heard on this show.

Ellen Eisendrath Post
Provided by the family

In the sunny room in which Ellen Eisendrath Post spent her last days, the room in which she died at 79 years of age on Friday, she was surrounded not only by the warmth and stimulation of people she loved but by an abundance of objects, new and old, and flowers and books — things that mattered to her and things she loved as well.

Women pray during the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis' service to celebrate Eid al-fitr, or the breaking of the month-long Ramadan fast.
Stephanie Lecci | St. Louis Public Radio

Hundreds of people, clad in colorful dresses and their finest clothes, filled the gymnasium at St. Louis Community College's Forest Park campus. After taking off their shoes, multi-generational families placed rugs on the floor, pointed in the same direction.

Waving, hugging and greeting one another, people waited for the beginning of the prayer service to mark the end of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

The Sheldon

The Cabaret Project of St. Louis will host its annual St. Louis Cabaret Festival from July 22-25 at the Sheldon Concert Hall and for one night at the Kranzberg Arts Center. The festival will feature three musical artists, including Tony-award winning singer Marilyn Maye, who will perform during the event’s opening night celebration.

Maye is scheduled to showcase her rendition of Frank Sinatra’s songs entitled “Sinatra – Her Way.” She has only performed the piece in a select few cities outside of New York.

Katie's Pizza
Sauce Magazine

Enjoying a beer, cocktail or glass of wine at the end of the workday – at a discounted price – is the epitome of a happy hour.

Our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine seeks to answer the question: Where are the best happy hours in the St. Louis area?

And, the magazine considered several “best of” happy hour categories including wine, beer, cocktails, day drinking, al fresco drinking, pitchers and ambiance.

The selection process was based on four qualities:

Courtesy of Dale Sweet

Beginning July 19, Cinema St. Louis will hold its annual St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase featuring works created by St. Louis artists and films with strong local ties.

The four-day event includes 88 films ranging from full-length fiction features to documentaries and multi-film compilations of fiction. Screenings for all films will take place at the Tivoli Theatre.

Some objects found inside the newly acquired GCADD buildings will remain
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

In Granite City, $75,000 can buy you almost an entire city block. At least if you’re an arts organization.

“This is the promised land is what it is, it’s the land of opportunity. And as much as it may sound hackneyed or trite, it’s true,” said Galen Gondolfi, founder of Fort Gondo Compound for the Arts.

This photo of Ozark Air Lines DC-3 plane by the Arch was taken in the 1960s after the Arch was completed.
Courtesy: Ozark Silver Swallows

Ozark Air Lines began operating in 1950, with commercial flights between St. Louis and Chicago and enroute stops at Springfield, Decatur, and Champaign Illinois. But in 1986, Trans World Airlines (TWA) took over the airline, its routes and aircraft, leaving behind memories of the regional airline.

At 5p.m. on July 21, the Tivoli Theatre will screen “The Swallows’ Tale: The Story of Ozark Air Lines,” a short documentary about the St. Louis-based airline. The film will air as part of Cinema St. Louis Filmmaker’s Showcase.

William Morris
Durrie Bouscaren

When William Morris was growing up in St. Louis in the 1970s, his mother was close behind with her Super 8 camera.

Marquise Knox at the Reykjavik Blues Festival in 2011
Olikristinn | Wikipedia

Grand Center is where you’ll find a variety of bands, beer tents, street art, food and drink specials and more Friday night.

This Music @ the Intersection Festival is one night in July, one in August and one in September. And it does not fit the pattern of the events in the Big List below. It has several bands each night in several venues.

Chess programs are offered in many area schools.
Ryan Chester | Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

The Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis has built a solid foundation of creating awareness and educating the urban area youth about chess. The challenge has been reaching similar audiences in rural communities ... until now.

By partnering with Monsanto Fund, the Chess Club is able to embark upon a new partnership featuring rural areas around St. Louis. Monsanto Fund, the philanthropic arm of the St. Louis-based company, recently announced a $20,580 grant to launch the program this summer.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, July 19 will be “The Norman Granz Labels-Part 1.”  During his career, Norman Granz founded the Clef, Norgran, Down Home, Verve and Pablo record labels.  These labels recorded mainstream and traditional jazz artists including Oscar Peterson, Ben Webster, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Jazz at the Philharmonic, Dizzy Gillespie, Stan Getz, Kenny Barron, Charlie Parker, Charlie Haden’s Liberation Music Orchestra, Clark Terry and others from 1944 until today.

The Slide Show contains my photographs of some of the artists heard on tonight's show.

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