Arts & Culture

Anniversary (B&D), 2012, 44“ x 57”, digital print on Somerset Velvet, edition # 1/3.   Bruno David
Courtesy of Bruno David Projects and the Artist

Heather Bennett’s photography often leads her on a quest for objects like classic cars, vintage dresses and snakeskin purses. Sometimes the props are a little stranger. During one shoot Bennett searched for a pair of brass knuckles, but had no luck.  Bennett's friend was a model for the shoot, and surprised Bennett. He offered to let her use his pair.

“I was like why do two of my friends have brass knuckles? I was a little shocked by that,” said the photographer.

Working on new chandelier from "Phantom"
Nancy Fowler

A new chandelier, updated special effects and a sense that the main characters have spent some time in a therapist’s chair: these are all changes included in Cameron Mackintosh's new production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's “The Phantom of the Opera.”

Rick Dildine
Shakespeare Festival St. Louis

Just months after leaving Shakespeare Festival St. Louis, Rick Dildine is returning to his post of executive and artistic director.

Wu-Tang Clan leader RZA, looking at a portion of the WCHOF's Bobby Fischer exhibit during October's opening ceremony of Living Like Kings.
Carmody Creative | World Chess Hall of Fame

Last chance to experience Living Like Kings: The Unexpected Collision of Chess and Hip Hop Culture, as the endgame nears for the two-floor, multifaceted art installation on display at the World Chess Hall of Fame. The continuously evolving exhibit, exploring how chess has interwoven within the urban subculture, has included rotating features of music, art, dance and spirituality and now enters final stages before its close next month.

Lydia Berry, number 100, in orange leotard
The Muny

Ever thought about trying out for America's oldest, largest outdoor theater?

Each year, the 98-year-old St. Louis Muny holds open auditions; anyone can come. Singers and dancers try out on different weekends.

St. Louis Scottish Games

The world championship of Scottish athletics is coming to Chesterfield this fall. The sporting event, Masters World Championship (MWC), is coordinating this year with the annual St. Louis Scottish Games and Cultural Festival.

The success of the local event, held in Forest Park since 2001, has helped in drawing the global competition to the area, said St. Louis’s Scottish Games spokesman Mark Sutherland.

'Radiolab' hosts Robert Krulwich, left, and Jad Abumrad talk about how they build their show on Feb. 26, 2015, at Washington University in St. Louis.
Katie Cook / St. Louis Public Radio

Even off the air, Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, well-known as the hosts of “Radiolab,” have a chemistry that just works. They giggle and bicker. They finish each other’s sentences and thoughts. They start stories and get lost in tangents. They’re an old married couple, without being old or married.

They started as something of an echo, to hear Krulwich tell it. With a 25-year gap, Krulwich and Abumrad attended the same college, accepted their first jobs at the same radio station, then moved on to NPR and New York.

Portraits of Purpose Ken Cooper
Courtesy of Ken Cooper

Former Post-Dispatch and St. Louis American reporter Ken Cooper just published his first book, "Portraits of Purpose: A Tribute to Leadership."  The book is a collaboration with the photographer Don West and chronicles the lives of influential Bostonian African Americans. Yet, nestled within the book’s 116 profiles are the stories of five St. Louisans.

Show Me Arts Academy kids rehearse to Bruno Mars' "Uptown Funk"
Willis Ryder Arnold/St. Louis Public Radio

Frustration gripped local singer and actress Marty Casey in the days after Michael Brown’s death at the hands of then-Officer Darren Wilson. This weekend, a little more than six months later, Casey and 10 other people launched Show Me Arts Academy, the organization born from her call.

Race is a social concept, not a scientific one.

“Biology shows us there are no real races in the world,” Washington University physical anthropology professor Robert Wald Sussman told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday. “Humans are just humans, basically.”

Sussman explores how religion, pseudo-science and prejudice have been used since the Spanish Inquisition to promote racism, eugenics and anti-immigration policies in his book “The Myth of Race: The Troubling Persistence of an Unscientific Idea.”

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