Arts & Culture

alt-rock band American Authors
courtesy Fair St. Louis

Country, rock and R&B fans will all have a free night of entertainment tailored to their interests this summer during Fair St. Louis.

Additional artists performing at the fair were announced Thursday: alt-rock band American Authors, bluesy pop singer Noah Guthrie, R&B trio Tony! Toni! Toné! and pioneering female rapper MC Lyte. Local band Dirty Muggs will also take a turn on stage.

Photo Flood Photographer Jeni Kulka's September 20th Image in Tower Grove Park
Photo Flood Photographer Jeni Kulka

With the way the weather has been going on the weekend, just pick what you're interested in and head out. The rain seems to come for a bit but not necessarily wipe things out. Hope that statement isn't a jinx.

Alarm Will Sound rehearses "Unfair for the Common Man" Ryan Mcneely
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

While studying music at St. Louis Community College-Meramec, Ryan Mcneely presented one professor with a part-classical part-jazz composition. According to Mcneely, his professor reacted with a sneering question and dismissed the work.

“Why are you even here?”

Fabiano Caruana and Hikaru Nakamura
Provided by the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

At the beginning of the 2014-15 FIDE Grand Prix cycle there was just one American attempting to qualify for the Candidates Tournament; but by the end of the series, two American flags topped the leaderboard. As previously reported, American-born Fabiano Caruana changed federations mid-cycle to once again represent the U.S.

Leo Drey
Provided by the family

In 1929, Luther Ely Smith, whom the National Park Service calls “the father of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial,” convened a group of civic worthies for lunch at the old Noonday Club downtown. Later on, a fellow named Leo Drey joined the group. Mr. Drey, who died Wednesday at the age of 98, would become a stalwart member of the group, and one of its most dynamic leaders.

Martin Duggan
The Nine Network

Martin Duggan became the leader of Donnybrook, one of the most popular locally produced programs in the nation when, after 45 years, his job at the St. Louis Globe-Democrat disappeared.

“I was 62, at the peak of my career, and some people thought I’d be the next publisher,” Mr. Duggan told St. Louis Magazine in 2009. “Then the paper was sold out from under us.”

Author, historian and public speaker Lou Baczewski
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Lou Baczewski, historian and author, joined “St. Louis on the Air” to talk about his efforts to document and honor his grandfather's World War II service to benefit three veterans organizations. Baczewski is the author of "Louch: A Simple Man's True Story of War, Survival, Life and Legacy.” The book chronicles his grandfather’s time growing up impoverished in rural Illinois, fighting several major battles in World War II and then returning to civilian life.

On May 23, 2015, the Chinese Lantern Festival returned to the Missouri Botanical Garden for the first time since 2012.
Jamie Heuer

On Saturday night, the Chinese Lantern Festival's return to the Missouri Botanical Garden came amid a sellout crowd of 4,500 people.

It’s extremely uncommon to see an authentic Chinese lantern festival outside of Asia. The garden staged its first lantern festival in 2012 as a onetime event and celebration of the completion of Flora of China, a 25-year project documenting China’s wild plants that was completed in cooperation with gardens in China.

Katelyn Mae Petrin / St. Louis Public Radio

A group of skaters screeched, weaving circles around the rink. Dozens of booths sat in the rink’s center. Artists sat at the booths, selling their work to the crowd that milled through the rink. The skaters flew past T-shirts printed with crass but clever jokes, collages of old pinups, fanarts of popular comics.

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

The elm and oak trees have grown tall with age in Section 57 of Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in south St. Louis County. It’s a quiet place, where songbirds rule the peace from the branches above.

Amid the white marble tombstones, row on row, stands one stone obelisk from another era. It marks the final resting place of African-American Civil War soldiers from Missouri who died from cholera in August 1866, as they made their way home from the war.

Pages