Arts & Culture | St. Louis Public Radio

Arts & Culture

The grounds crew works on the field at Busch Stadium last week. Construction was still under way on the Budweiser Terrace, a new social gathering area in the upper right field seating sections. It will feature lounge seating, standing areas and two bars.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

After a cold and wet start to the season, Major League Baseball finally sloshes into the Gateway City at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, when the Clydesdales take their first strut of the season around the warning track at Busch Stadium.

The St. Louis Cardinals are promising all of the traditional trimmings for their home-opening ceremonies: Motorcades will deliver the Hall of Famers and the 2018 team to home plate. There will be a color guard, a giant American flag at center field, and — weather permitting — a flyover by a KC-135 Stratotanker, an Air Force refueling aircraft.

The bibimbap bowl at VP Square is a dish from Sauce Magazine's 'Hit List' for April 2018.
Michelle Volansky | Sauce Magazine

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with our partners from Sauce Magazine about the best new restaurants to try during the month of April.

Joining him for the discussion were Catherine Klene and Matt Sorrell, managing editor and staff writer, respectively.

Sonja Perryman has found her niche at the intersection of storylines and public health.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Sonja Perryman’s love for storytelling developed early in life, along with her sense of its potential to impact lives. She has vivid memories of reading “The Baby-Sitters Club” books as a girl and telling her father about one particular character in the series.

“I was like, ‘Yeah, she has diabetes, and she’s always thirsty and always hungry,’” Perryman recalled in a conversation this week on St. Louis on the Air. “And I remember my dad’s face going pale – well, as pale as it could go, but he looked like he saw a ghost – and he was like, ‘What were her symptoms again?’”

Tickets to the touring version of "Hamilton," coming to the Fox Theatre, sold out in less than five hours.
Joan Marcus

After standing in line, waiting in online queues and forking out big bucks, St. Louisans will be able see “Hamilton” in their hometown.

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s blend of musical theater, hip-hop, blues, jazz and rap begins Tuesday night and runs through April 22 at The Fox Theatre. The musical turns traditional casting on its head, with actors of color playing the men who shaped the nation, including the first Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton and Vice President Aaron Burr.

Anna Quindlen fields a question from Don Marsh during last week’s event.
Photo courtesy of St. Louis County Library

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, listeners heard host Don Marsh in conversation with bestselling novelist Anna Quindlen. She was in town last week for a book-signing event presented by St. Louis County Library, and Marsh interviewed her on stage before an audience of more than 200 people.

Among many other topics, the discussion touched on Quindlen’s decision to give up a Pulitzer Prize-winning career in journalism to become a full-time novelist.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for April 1, 2018 will be “Grammy Winners in My Collection-Part 1.”  In it’s early days, the jazz Grammy Awards were not awarded for great music, but by the popularity of the musicians and the Hollywood-Centric voters.  Great music began to creep in by the late 1960’s.  We will play selections from the 80 Grammy winning jazz recordings in my collection from 1959 to the present.  In all of the Jazz Grammys, there is no Miles Davis’s “Kind of Blue,” John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme,” Dave Brubeck’s “Time Out,” not one Blue Note label or Prestige label 1960’s jazz classi

A painting of William H. Gass hangs in Washington University's Olin Library. (Detail; oil on canvas, 1995, Marion Miller)
Image courtesy of Washington University

The writings of the late author and philosopher William H. Gass have a reputation for being cerebrally intimidating to some would-be readers. But when Joel Minor opened one of Gass’ books for the first time years ago, he was pleasantly surprised by a sense of accessibility.

“I found his work very approachable,” said Minor, who now oversees the Modern Literature Collection where Gass’ literary archive is housed. “‘Middle C’ is, I think, a very engrossing, approachable book. If you go into it knowing it’s not going to be a strictly linear narrative from start to finish, you’re going to be able to follow it and really appreciate his ability to work the language in a unique way in this character’s perspective.”

Busch Stadium in 2014.
OAKLEYORIGINALS | FLICKR | HTTP://BIT.LY/1QD8RZX

This week brought the start of the Major League Baseball season and the first defeat for the St. Louis Cardinals, who lost a 9-4 opener to the New York Mets. But the Redbirds have 161 games yet to go this year, and longtime sports writer Rob Rains says the team is looking stronger than it was a year ago.

“I like the young pitchers,” he told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Friday. “I really think they’re probably still a year away from being a really good team because of the youth of the pitchers.”

Basketball players huddle for a prayer at the Monsanto Family YMCA.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

For Marcus Wilson, basketball is more than just a game — and he has the career to prove it. Before becoming the executive director of the Monsanto Family YMCA, Wilson learned that basketball could take him far in life and away from the rough neighborhood he came from.

Now he wants to make sure others have that same opportunity.

Every Saturday morning, Wilson opens the court of his YMCA off of Page Blvd., free of charge for anyone wanting to play basketball.

Sister An Mei, left, and Sister Mary Lea Hill wave to a group of high school students who recently visited the Pauline Books and Media store in Crestwood.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The Daughters of St. Paul have operated Pauline Books and Media, a small bookstore adjoining their convent in Crestwood, since the 1980s. But these days, the Roman Catholic sisters are reaching people far beyond St. Louis with their posts and videos on Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram.

Using the hashtag #MediaNuns, they tweet friendly messages of inspiration:

“If you do nothing else today, remember that God loves you.”

MADCO, Saint Louis Ballet and The Big Muddy Dance Company all come together this weekend for “New Dance Horizons VI: Live at the Grandel” presented by Dance St. Louis.
Gerry Love

Several weeks’ worth of intensive collaboration will culminate this Saturday as three local dance companies present brand-new works during a performance that is really three shows in one.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed what makes the “New Dance Horizons VI: Live at the Grandel” event particularly unique. Joining the conversation were Brian Enos, artistic director of The Big Muddy Dance Company, and Terence Marling, artistic consultant for Dance St. Louis.

Madalyn Painter Talla started a Thanksgiving Day tradition with her family where she cooks biryani, a time intensive rice dish.
Madalyn Painter Talla | St. Louis Public Radio

India is one of the most populated and diverse countries – and some of its nuances are reflected in its cuisine.

Joining host Don Marsh to discuss the diverse flavors, styles and recipes of Indian cuisine was Sauce Magazine’s art director, Meera Nagarajan, and her mother Revathy Nagarajan. They focused on the food varieties in north and south India and dispelled common misconceptions about the cuisine. They stressed that curry is not only a spice, but rather a number of dishes, and that not all Indian food is spicy.

Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

In Emeara Burns’ north St. Louis neighborhood, gun violence is a way of life.

Fabiano Caruana draped in an American Flag, March, 2018
Nick Dunaevsky

American chess fans everywhere are cheering in the streets, as countryman Fabiano Caruana overcame the game’s elite grandmasters to win the recently concluded Candidates Tournament in Berlin, Germany. He is now qualified to play world champion Magnus Carlsen for his title in November. It is the first time an American will compete for the crown in more than two decades. The last victory for the United States was in 1972, when Bobby Fischer won an epic match against the Russian Boris Spassky in Reykjavik, Iceland.

Historical papers and religious items dated back to 1896 filled the time capsule found under the Our Lady of Good Counsel Chapel. Photo from March 28, 2018.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

A hobby preservationist cracked open a time capsule from 1896 this morning to find a well-preserved collection of Catholic religious items and historic papers.

Jim Meiners found the copper box in the foundation of the Chapel of Our Lady of Good Counsel, which was demolished with the Clemens House after the property caught fire last year.

“It would’ve been put there when the building was built, and we don’t know what’s in it,” he said before cutting into the lead seal on the box.

Good Service Is A Coin Toss For Those 'Dining While Black'

Mar 27, 2018

When many black diners go out to eat, it’s not uncommon for them to question if race plays a part in the service they receive.

Turns out, that’s not paranoia.

Zach Brewster is an assistant professor of sociology at Wayne State University in Michigan. He has conducted several national research studies on the experience of dining and restaurant discrimination. In his 2015 survey of approximately 1,000 waiters and waitresses across the country, 53 percent of the participants admitted to not giving black diners their best service.

“Souvenir,” the story of singer Florence Foster Jenkins, presented by Max & Louie Productions, won five Theater Circle awards including Outstanding Actress, Actor and Production of a Comedy.
Max & Louie Productions

St. Louis’ small theater companies were the big winners Monday night in the sixth annual Theater Circle awards.

Stray Dog Theatre took home six awards for the musical “Ragtime” and another for “A Doll’s House.” “Ragtime,” the story of African-American life in the early 20th Century, won in categories including Outstanding Actor, Actress and Production of a Musical.

Sisters Sadia (left) and Yusra (right) Ali talked about CAIR-MO’s annual art exhbit showcasing various local Muslim talent.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Sisters Sadia and Yusra Ali are Muslims who’ve grown up in Ballwin, Missouri, sharing a love and appreciation of fine arts. In their circles, such creative pursuit is fairly uncommon.

“We’re always looking for the most secure line of work, the most unique line of study, the most secure relationship,” Sadia Ali said of her community. “And art is a challenge for security.”

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited  for  March 25, 2018 will be “The Keys and Strings Hour Plus New Music.”  Jazz Unlimited is still not finished with the music of Bill Evans, so there will be more of it in the “Keys and Strings Hour,” played by Evans himself, Joe Pass and Toots Thielemans.  In addition, the last two hours of the show will feature new music, including a new CD by St.

A total of 293 objects discovered in the Mediterranean Sea comprise “Sunken Cities: Egypt’s Lost Worlds,” an exhibition that runs from March 25 to Sept. 9.
Christoph Gerigk © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

As an underwater archaeologist, Franck Goddio has explored many strange and fascinating things under the sea during the course of his career. But nothing quite compares to the moment he first came across the remains of an ancient city just off the coast of modern-day Egypt.

The president of the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology described what that experience was like on this week’s St. Louis on the Air in conversation with host Don Marsh and Lisa Çakmak, associate curator of ancient art at the Saint Louis Art Museum.

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