Arts & Culture

Katelyn Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio intern

When Star Clipper closed this March, some people cried, others Tweeted their frustration. In its 26 years in business, the store had become a beloved cultural center, event space and small press distributor for lovers of comics, graphic novels and collectibles.

Steve Unverferth and Tony Favello responded in a different way. They took on the store’s name, bought its shelves and hired its staff.

Nathan Pence, jazz bassist and high school senior
Devin Rodino / Jazz St. Louis

JazzU is a program of Jazz St. Louis that places talented middle and high school musicians in jazz combos. Applications for the 2015-2016 season are due May 1 and auditions will take place June 1-4.

This year, 53 students in the St. Louis area are part of the program and represent nearly four dozen schools. One participant of the JazzU program is Nathan Pence, a jazz bassist and senior at Bishop DuBourg High School.

“It’s really just inspiring to be in the program and that just pushed me forward,” Pence told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday.

Beyon Bosch exhibit print
Courtesy of the Saint Louis Art Museum

Did you ever read the description next to a museum painting and scratch your head? The St. Louis Art Museum and Washington University students worked together to combat that head-scratching moment for a new exhibit.

Art museums are working to avoid jargon, or art speak. In this case, the topic is a bit more obscure than Picasso or Rembrandt. It's the influence of 16th century Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch on the common culture of his time.

Kelsey Proud / St. Louis Public Radio

Simon Lusky, team chef for the St. Louis Cardinals and owner of Athlete Eats on Cherokee Street, plans to start operating a food truck and open a new restaurant in Brentwood.

And, as reported by our partners at Sauce Magazine, the restaurant will re-brand as Revel Kitchen. The food truck will be called Revel Kitchen Food Truck and will debut at the magazine’s Food Truck Friday on May 8.

Protesters in Ferguson in August
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Public Radio has won six Edward R. Murrow  2015 regional awards. The honor recognizes St. Louis Public Radio's overall efforts for both digital and radio reporting excellence. This year, awards were granted in ten categories.

Most of the awards recognize the reporting on Michael Brown's death in Aug. 2014 and the protests and unrest that followed. That reporting reflected the efforts of everyone in the newsroom, including St. Louis on the Air, our daily talk show.

Candles are set out and numbered for each table's cadaver. Every candle was lit by students before the appreciation ceremony began.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

For almost a decade students from Washington University School of Medicine’s first year gross anatomy class have held a ceremony honoring their “first patients.” These patients are people who donated their bodies to the medical school for this purpose.

First year medical student, Jorge Zarate, 22, respects the knowledge he’s gained from learning anatomy from a cadaver and wants to honor the people who donated their bodies.

Garry Kasparov, with Rex Sinquefield in the background
Lennart Ootes | Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

When the king moves, every piece, on every corner of this checker-boarded earth, takes notice. That is why most of Garry Kasparov’s moves around St. Louis these days often come and go in secret.

Small circles know that the world’s greatest living chess legend sneaks into the Central West End a time or two a year; but for the non-privy, he simply appears at the front door of the St. Louis Chess Club, with no less surprise than if he had stepped from a sudden poof of smoke.

Item displayed at “Capturing Hearts and Minds: Images of Nazi Propaganda and Disinformation” at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center
Julia Bishop-Cross / via Flickr

Two St. Louis exhibits closely examine the powerful role of propaganda during the rise of Nazi Germany.

The first is “Capturing Hearts and Minds: Images of Nazi Propaganda and Disinformation,” and is at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center. The other, at the Missouri History Museum, is a traveling exhibit from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum called, “State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda.” 

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for April 19 will be “The Music of Herbie Hancock.”  Jazz Master Herbie Hancock has been actively been writing, performing and recording his original music for 54 years.  His early success with Blue Note records and with Miles Davis provided a springboard for an exceptionally creative life.  He has written and performed in several different styles of music.  Born in Chicago, he was recognized as a prodigy, playing a movement the 26th Mozart Piano Concerto with the Chicago Symphony at age 12.  He simultaneously earned engineering and music degrees from Grinnell College.  His e

Alla Voskoboynikova grew up in a small town in Russia near Moscow. She received both bachelor’s and master’s degrees in piano performance before moving to St. Louis in 1996.

Since 2004, Voskoboynikova, the director of Keyboard Studies at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, has seen many of her former students go on to graduate school and successful careers as performers and teachers.

“This is probably the greatest reward for all the hours of hard work,” Voskoboynikova told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday.

Pages