Arts & Culture

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Talk to the director and producer of the giant screen film “Living in the Age of Airplanes,” for more than 20 seconds and you’ll realize: this guy digs airplanes. Brian Terwilliger, whose cinematic resume has been built on documenting the power of flight, said that he wanted to make audiences feel the same awe with his most recent feature, now playing at the Saint Louis Science Center.

Artists First executive director Sheila Suderwalla helps Vietnam veteran Mike David with a charcoal project.
Artists First

Mike David came home from Vietnam in the early 1970s with two Purple Hearts and a feeling of doom after spending a year in combat on a squad known as a “killer team.”

“All six of us were in constant fear for our lives, every moment of the day,” he said.

It took David a decade to start dealing with his PTSD with the help of friends and meditation. He wishes he’d had more creative opportunities to heal, like a new program offered by a Maplewood organization called Artists First.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for March 20, 2016 is “The Music of Sonny Rollins.”  Tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins is one of the greatest living improvisers in jazz.  Over his sixty plus year career, he has taken part in many recordings as both a leader and sideman.  He has also composed well-known jazz standards that remain challenging today.  We will him with his own groups, Bud Powell, Brown/Roach Inc. Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk.  His compositions will be played by St. Louisan Grant Green with Sonny Clark, J.J.

Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

The spring season of the Gaslight Cabaret Festival has returned, featuring 12 artists and 22 performances over the course of nine weekends. Two performers with a long, friendly history on the New York cabaret scene joined “St. Louis on the Air” contributor Steve Potter to discuss their performances this weekend.

Marissa Mulder, a cabaret singer, will perform a tribute to Marilyn Monroe in a variety of styles. She said she drew inspiration to do so from a photograph.

“There was just something about her eyes in the photograph that registered with me,” Mulder said.

Michael B. | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1MbTzFk

Morgan Hagedorn asked a question of Curious Louis that we’ve heard echoed at least 1000 times in 1000 different situations all over St. Louis.

Why are St. Louisans so fixated on where other people went to high school?

Laura Heidotten | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s been one week since St. Louis Public Radio held its first Tiny Desk Concert with Mt. Thelonious.  We’re still reeling from all the good times!

We were so pleased with number of entries and the variety of sounds submitted by St. Louis that we decided to take a deeper dive into the submissions. TDC entries could only showcase one song but there’s so much more out there. So here’s an offering of surprises we found while “crate-digging” through the catalogs of the entrants.

Drew Heitzler's Gravity's Rainbow
Provided by Amy Granat

Drew Heitzler’s latest work examines the intersection between St. Louis, Los Angeles, and a book that momentarily broke the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. 

Heitzler's show is the current exhibit at Parapet/RealHumans, a gallery space in the Fox Park neighborhood. It draws attention to a moment in 1974 when the Pulitzer Prize for fiction wasn’t awarded. 

A look inside the Old Cathedral's renovation
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

The oldest Roman Catholic cathedral west of the Mississippi River is fully open to visitors once again.

The Basilica of St. Louis, better known as the Old Cathedral, never shut down during a multi-million dollar renovation that restored the church to its 1870s glory.

Map of Metro's reconfigured bus service in north. St. Louis County
Metro Transit

Dozens of Metro bus drivers are tracing new routes through north St. Louis County starting this week. The service changes stem from the new North County Transit Center that opened Monday in Ferguson to serve one of the area’s fastest growing markets. 

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Cecilia Nadal, the founder and executive director of Gitana Productions, remembers the first time she met Faraja Lungele, a 14-year-old refugee who came to the United States from Kenya after fleeing the Congo.  Lungele would repeatedly peek into rehearsals in the basement of St. Louis Public Library’s Carpenter branch in south St. Louis and quickly return upstairs, without saying a word.

After three or four sightings, Nadal pulled Lungele aside, they talked, and she found out that Lungele loved to sing and dance.

Saint Louis University Hospital
Courtesy SSM Health

When the industrialist Firmin Desloge died in 1929 at 86 years of age, his various enterprises, including Missouri lead mining, made him as rich as tycoons such as William K. Vanderbilt and Andrew Mellon. In obituaries he was described as one of the wealthiest men in America, and his status was buoyed as well by his membership in the select group of the French-American aristocracy. A portrait photograph shows him sporting a great bushy mustache, along with unruly curly hair and a very content and happy face.

Hikaru Nakamura and Irina Krush are defending champions.
Provided by the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

In less than one month, the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis will once again become the most interesting chess club in the world. That is not because of some fluke; the American chess crème de la crème is set to step foot in the venue and engage in an unprecedented war over the chessboard.

You Are My Reflection by Erin Rachel Hudak. Installed with the help of St. Louis Community College students at Paul Artspace
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

A North County arts venue is undergoing a dramatic change on the eve of its third birthday.

For the past two years, artists and curators who have been accepted as residents at Paul Artspace have paid to spend months on-site using studios and tools. From now on, those residencies will be free.

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Illustrated by Susannah Lohr / St. Louis Public Radio

NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest gives bands the chance to compete to play a concert at NPR’s headquarters, appear on the game show Ask Me Another, and tour across the country.

 

To bring that competition home, St. Louis Public Radio held our own Tiny Desk Contest. We collected submissions to the national contest and had you, our readers and listeners, vote on your favorite act. Voting is now closed, but you can still see all of the entries.

Mark Wallace, Alyssa Avery and Ian Lubar of Mt. Thelonious were great guests and played to a packed lobby, around our own version of a tiny desk, for close to an hour. Watch their performance below. and visit their website for more music and show dates.

Diane Rehm
The Washington Post/Getty Images

Famed NPR host Diane Rehm has not scaled back the magnitude of the issues she is tackling after she announced her planned retirement from behind the microphone earlier this year. In fact, she is taking on one of the most difficult topics for most of us to talk about: death.

Carmen Troesser | Sauce Magazine

Two St. Louis chefs are finalists in the James Beard Foundation Awards in the category of Best Chef: Midwest.

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

Fog added a magical touch to the drive along the Great River Road in Illinois on Sunday. 

For much of the day, the fog held thick over the water at Grafton, the confluence of the Mississippi and Illinois rivers. By dusk, the blanket had thinned, offering stunning photo ops.

One of the rugs in the Carpet and the Connoiseur exhibit at the St. Louis Art Museum. This is a western Anatolian knotteed woll carpet with 'Lotto' patter from the 16th century.
Courtesy, St. Louis Art Museum

In the art exhibitions business, when you find yourself faced with the conflicting character attributes of a millionaire who built his fortune on patent medicines of questionable quality yet who carried with him works of art of extraordinary aesthetic and historical value, you can be reasonably certain of having a hit on your hands.

Some St. Louisans enjoy a full breakfast; others get by on coffee alone. Then there's everything in between, from rum cake to Gogurts.
Susannah Lohr / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis is known for toasted Ravioli and Ted Drewes. But what do we eat for the most important meal of the day?

We at St. Louis Public Radio have become sorta-experts on what St. Louisans wake up to. That’s because when we interview people (including each other), we often begin with the question, “What did you have for breakfast?” to check our microphone levels.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for March 13, 2016 will be “Jazz Families-Blood Relatives-Part 5.”  This last program on the genetics of jazz will feature music by the Joe and Walter “Foots” Thomas, the New Orleans Humphrey, Joseph, Batiste, Barker, Barbarin, and Jordan families, George E. and Julia Lee, the Hall Brothers, Nicholas Payton and his father Walter, the Sims brothers, St. Louis’s Silverman brothers, the Freemans of Chicago, Oscar Pettiford and his brother Alonzo, Ingrid and Christine Jensen, and Alice Coltrane and her half brother, Ernie Farrow.

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