Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
4:09 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Arch City Radio Hour: Fred Friction And Jason Hutto Interview And Peformance

Fred Friction (l) and Jason Hutto (r) in the St. Louis Public Radio studios prepping for their interview/performance on Arch City Radio Hour.
Credit (Courtesy of Mike Schrand)

Interview with Fred Friction and Jason Hutto

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Cityscape
3:51 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Larger-Than-Life Production Of ‘Carmina Burana’ At The Touhill

Nashville Ballet's "Carmina Burana," Lady Fortune and Ensemble
Marianne Leach

When a symphony orchestra performs Carl Orff’s “Carmina Burana,” it’s always something of a spectacle.  The stage is packed to the brim with a large orchestra including two pianos and celeste, vocal soloists, a chorus and children’s chorus.  But Nashville Ballet Artistic Director Paul Vasterling’s vision of “Carmina Burana” employing 120 singers, 60 orchestral musicians and 40 dancers takes the work to new proportions. 

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2:23 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

'Why Are There So Many Bosnians In St. Louis?' Atlantic Cities Asks

Lead in text: 
The folks over at Atlantic Cites have an article up today examining the origins of our sizable Bosnian immigrant population. St. Louis native Kathy Gilsinan writes the piece. Also, check out our Tim Lloyd's series on the city's Bosnian population - click on the "Bosnian community" tag below.
binkle_28/Flickr Just off Interstate 44, South St. Louis's brick houses hug a wide central boulevard, overlooked by a limestone and terra cotta water tower that hasn't actually distributed water since 1929. There's a sprawling university to the north, and, a few exits further east down the highway, St.
Arts & Culture
1:31 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

One City's Love Affair With Processed Cheese

Provel, as seen in its native habitat.
Jessica Stewart Allergic to Air

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 2:00 pm

With 30 Rock off the air, Judah Friedlander has time to indulge other interests. Like processed cheese.

Friedlander, who played Frank on the sitcom (the guy with all the custom baseball caps), says he's been "obsessed" for the past several years with Provel, a processed blend of Swiss, provolone and cheddar rarely found outside its hometown of St. Louis.

"It's not even legally cheese," Friedlander tells The Salt. "It's melted plastic from the '80s."

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Cityscape
11:52 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Challenging Traditional Art: British Artist Jeremy Deller's Work On View At CAM

Artist Jeremy Deller
Jeremy Deller

When British conceptual artist Jeremy Deller chose to stage his first private exhibition back in 1993, he decided to go with a small, intimate setting he knew well: his bedroom.

“It wasn’t so full of people, but I didn’t want it to be full of people,” he says of Open Bedroom, which was by invitation only. “I was terrified that someone would put a cigarette end out on a table or a carpet or something.”

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Arts & Culture
5:33 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Turning My Back On The Boy Scouts

Every February since I was eleven years old, my thoughts turn to the Boy Scouts of America. February is the month in which Scouting celebrates its birth as a beloved American institution. But Scouting did not originate in the United States. It took shape from the vision and dedication of a highly decorated British soldier, Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell.  His birthday was February 22, 1857. He is credited with founding the Scouting movement in 1908.

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Opinion
11:09 am
Thu February 14, 2013

The Dark Origins Of Valentine's Day

A drawing depicts the death of St. Valentine — one of them, anyway. The Romans executed two men by that name on Feb. 14 of different years in the 3rd century A.D.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 10:42 am

Valentine's Day is a time to celebrate romance and love and kissy-face fealty. But the origins of this festival of candy and cupids are actually dark, bloody — and a bit muddled.

Though no one has pinpointed the exact origin of the holiday, one good place to start is ancient Rome, where men hit on women by, well, hitting them.

Those Wild And Crazy Romans

From Feb. 13 to 15, the Romans celebrated the feast of Lupercalia. The men sacrificed a goat and a dog, then whipped women with the hides of the animals they had just slain.

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Photo of the Week
6:17 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Rush Hour

Kemolledog Via Flickr

Photo taken in by "Kemolledog" on Flickr.com.

Join the St. Louis Public Radio Flickr group to see interesting photos taken in the St. Louis region and submit your own. Each week on our website and Facebook page we feature one outstanding photo from the group.

St. Louis on the Air
4:46 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Missour-ee Or Missour-uh? Talking About Talking In St. Louis And Beyond

Kelsey Proud / St. Louis Public Radio

Is it Missour-ee or Missour-uh?

Those two pronunciations of the state, according to linguist John Baugh of Washington University in St. Louis, peacefully co-exist and are “indicative of all of the linguistic collisions from the rest of the country that happen in our wonderful city.”

Baugh and linguist Cindy Brantmeier of Washington University joined host Don Marsh to talk about how language forms, evolves, and is spoken differently throughout the United States.

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Arts & Culture
6:12 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Appraisals Show History Museum Drastically Overpaid For Property

Missouri History Museum
Credit (via Wikimedia Commons)

An appraisal released on Tuesday shows that the Missouri History Museum paid ex-Mayor Freeman Bosley Jr. over three times market rate for property Bosley sold the museum in 2006.

The sale which was only recently discovered was the catalyst behind a series of events which led to the resignation of Museum President Bob Archibald.

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