Arts & Culture

Eric Christensen, host of STL Up Late
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

If you haven't heard of St. Louis' only late night talk show, you're not alone.

Even though STL Up Late begins its fourth season Saturday night, the interactive show’s reach is limited because it’s a live stage event without a means of distribution. But that could soon change.

“We’ve been doing it for a while and we’re hoping we can get a bigger audience by getting this online or on TV,” said Eric Christensen, the host of STL Up Late. A pilot of the show was recently filmed.

The City & The City: Cotton Belt Freight Depot, 2015
(Courtesy of the artist and RYAN LEE, New York ©Mariam Ghani)

Mariam Ghani came to St. Louis with the idea of an already divided city.

“There’s a lot of long and complicated history that goes into making St. Louis what it is today,” Ghani said.

Conductor Hannu Lintu.
Kaapo Kamu

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony's 2014-2015 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, April 11. 

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are. 

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

Red and violet hues are seen in discoloration on the Gateway Arch, as an engineer and scientist from Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc., studies its exterior.
Courtesy of Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.

The stains on the Gateway Arch's steel surface are not due to significant structural distress, deterioration or corrosion, according to the results of a comprehensive study on the monument's structural health released Thursday.

Librarian Gina Sheridan is the author of "I Work at a Public Library."
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

As a librarian, Gina Sheridan sees her share of bizarre, strange and heartwarming stories. She’s the manager of the St. Louis County Library’s Mid-County Branch in Clayton.

Sheridan is the author of, “I Work at a Public Library: A Collection of Crazy Stories from the Stacks." In addition to sharing some unforgettable stories about patrons, the book is also a celebration of librarians.

Shualee Cook and Sara Burke
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

Since 2002, the Visionary Awards have honored 68 St. Louis-area women for contributions to the arts, but this year's list includes a first.

Shualee Cook, 37, a transgender woman, is honored as an Emerging Artist for her skills as a playwright. Cook’s “An Invitation Out” opens at Mustard Seed Theater Friday, April 17.

Wesley So, left, and Hikaru Nakamura played to a draw.
Lennart Ootes | Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

The youngest and strongest U.S. Chess Championship in history has just crossed the midway point at the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis, and the event has already seen enough drama to vie as one of the most-exciting U.S. Championships in history, as well.

After six games in the 12-player round-robin tournament, alone in front is the No. 1 seed and pre-tournament favorite, Grandmaster Hikaru Nakamura, who has scored three victories and three draws to earn 4.5/6 points.

Fair Saint Louis enters its 35th year with a line-up that includes acts from Chris Young to Kool & the Gang. PR Chairman for Fair St. Louis Alonzo Byrd says organizers strive to acknowledge St. Louis is a music city.

Phil Donato is the "Trivia Guy."
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Trivia nights are part of the culture of St. Louis. On weekends it’s not uncommon to find several of the events, which are most often fundraisers for nonprofit organizations.

Phil Donato is St. Louis’ “Trivia Guy.” He’s is also the marketing, events and outreach manager at St. Louis Public Radio.

“It just brings a lot of people together … friends, families and co-workers to unwind. It’s a blue-collar, informal thing,” Donato told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Wednesday.

Missouri Gov. Alexander McNair's residence was at the northwest corner of Main and Spruce Streets. Daguerreotype by Thomas M. Easterly, 1850.
Courtesy of the Missouri History Museum

Many of St. Louis’ buildings have been lost to time, disaster, or destruction. It may seem like an inevitable byproduct of progress, but what do we lose when we lose a historic building? 

“Sometimes what we lose is so much more than the physical structure, it’s our collective, shared memory,” said Andrew Wanko, public historian at the Missouri History Museum, in a conversation with “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Tuesday.

"Lost Buildings of St. Louis" is a new exhibit at the museum that shares the stories behind many of St. Louis’ lost buildings.   

Pages