Asbestos | St. Louis Public Radio

Asbestos

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has passed legislation designed to reduce the number of asbestos lawsuits filed in the state.

The bill would require plaintiffs to submit their medical histories as evidence, including things not related to their claim. It would also make it easier for defendants to seek delays, and, if they lose, it would allow them within a year’s time to ask a judge for a reversal under certain conditions.

Environmental Protection Agency workers met with city health officials at the Clemens House before learning they did not have authorization to test the site for asbestos.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The Environmental Protection Agency has found no trace of asbestos near the Clemens House in north St. Louis, according to city officials.

The mansion, built by Mark Twain’s uncle in 1860, burned on July 12, causing some residents to be concerned about asbestos contamination. The St. Louis Health Department contacted the Environmental Protection Agency, which began putting monitors up in the area one week later.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated after the public meeting on 4-10-2014:

The meeting hosted Thursday night by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was supposed to focus on the first phase of the $30 million cleanup of the former Carter Carburetor plant in North St. Louis. That first phase involves removing asbestos from the site's main building.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon)

Every year, the American Tort Reform Association (ATRA) releases its annual list of so-called “judicial hellholes," a term it uses to refer to civil courts that ATRA believes are consistently unfair to corporate defendants.

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

A group that lobbies to make courts friendlier to business says it’s seeing a troubling increase in the number of large product liability cases filed in the city of St. Louis.

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Some streets around a ruptured steam pipe in downtown St. Louis are open again today after final test results for no risk from asbestos.

As we reported earlier this morning, the first 14 swabs from the north wall and balconies of the Lucas Lofts building and from the ground along Lucas Avenue came back negative for asbestos last night. City health director Pamela Walker tweeted around 10:15 am that the final 10 samples taken from the south wall of the Globe building were also negative.

Morning headlines: Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Apr 11, 2012
(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Tests near steam pipe rupture show no asbestos

The St. Louis city health department says tests from buildings around the site of a ruptured steam pipe have come back negative for asbestos.

The 20-inch pipe ruptured last Thursday morning, sending a plume of steam into the downtown air, along with possible asbestos.

Health Department: Health risk 'minimal' following downtown steam pipe rupture

Apr 6, 2012

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Updated 3:54 p.m. with comment from Walker

We have an update on that steam pipe rupture that happened in downtown St. Louis Thursday morning.  The City of St. Louis Department of Health says that "while swab samples have indicated small amounts of ground level asbestos, air quality tests have come back clean."

s_falkow | Flickr

The Illinois Supreme Court has ruled in favor of the family of Annette Simpkins of Granite City, Ill., returning her case to the Madison County circuit court for a trial.