astronomy

Twelve-year-old Ben Gremaud gets a preview of one of the telescopes at the St. Louis County Library, with the help of the St. Louis Astronomical Society's Don Ficken. If you look closely, you can see the library reflected in the telescope's mirror!
Véronique LaCapra|St. Louis Public Radio

Starting Nov. 10, you’ll be able to check out something a little unusual from some St. Louis-area public libraries: a telescope.

The program is a collaboration between the St. Louis Astronomical Society and public libraries in the city of St. Louis,  Kirkwood, University City and St. Louis County.

Anyone who is at least 18 years old and has a valid public library card and state I.D. will be able to check out a telescope for free for one week.

David Cortner

You don’t want to miss this, because it won’t happen again for more than 100 years.

Tuesday afternoon, starting just after 5 p.m., a rare astronomical event will be visible in the skies over St. Louis. It’s known as the transit of Venus. 

St. Louis Public Radio's Véronique LaCapra asked University of Missouri-St. Louis astrophysicist Erika Gibb to help explain this twice-in-a-lifetime phenomenon.