audio recording

Thelonius Kryptonite
Durrie Bouscaren

Ah, high school. The place where you can reinvent yourself after middle school, screw up, then graduate and reinvent yourself again. But for St. Louis musician Thelonius Kryptonite, University City High School was where he started out strong and just kept going.

It began with a little tabletop musical improvisation. Soon Kryptonite, known then as Corey Williams, began living a dual existence: joining marching band and becoming the king of hip-hop. Before graduation, he was already signed to the Soul Tide record label.

(via Flickr/kev_hickey_uk)


Updated 3:42 p.m. with Illinois Public Radio story.

Reporting by Illinois Public Radio's Brian Mackey used in this report.

Although the NATO protests in Chicago have come and gone, today the Illinois House took a second crack at making it legal to create audio recordings of police. This time the legislation passed.

(via Flickr/charlesdyer)

A bill letting people in Illinois record public activities by police and other officials is moving forward in the state Legislature.

A House committee approved the bill 9-2 Wednesday, sending it to the House floor for further action.

Rep. Elaine Nekritz says the legislation protects citizens who pull out cellphones or turn on a camera to record events they witness. The Northbrook Democrat says it's important to update the law because international visitors and journalists are coming to Chicago for the G-8 and NATO summits in May.