August Busch IV

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Former beer baron August Busch IV has agreed to pay $1.75 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit over his former girlfriend's accidental drug overdose death.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Jacob McCleland contributed reporting from Cape Girardeau.

A Cape Girardeau judge denied a deposition request on Tuesday in the wrongful death hearing of Adrienne Martin, the 27-year-old woman who died of a drug overdose in August Busch IV’s mansion in 2010.

Martin’s mother, Christine Trampler, requested depositions of Busch and three others.  But Judge William Syler denied her request because it would further drag out the year-and-a-half old case.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A judge in Cape Girardeau has postponed approval of a $1.5 million settlement in a woman's death at the home of former Anheuser-Busch CEO August Busch IV.

Busch had offered the settlement to a lawsuit filed by the ex-husband of Adrienne Martin, who died of a drug overdose Dec. 19 in Busch's mansion near St. Louis.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A wrongful death suit has been filed against August Busch IV on behalf of the son of Busch's deceased girlfriend, Adrienne Martin, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports.

According to the newspaper:

The case, filed in St. Louis County Circuit Court, seeks unspecified damages on behalf of Blake Alexander Martin, age 8. His father, Dr. Kevin Martin, is a plaintiff as his guardian. The suit claims "carelessness and negligence" by Busch.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 5:09 p.m. March 28, 2011 with additional reasons for leaving the board:

The St. Louis Business Journal reports other reasons for Busch's departure:

"For personal and health reasons August Busch IV has decided not to seek re-election at the annual shareholders meeting," A-B spokeswoman Marianne Amssoms said.

As updated 3:30 p.m. March 28, 2011:

The former CEO of Anheuser-Busch Cos., August A. Busch IV, will be leaving the board of Anheuser-Busch InBev following the annual shareholders' meeting, Bloomberg News reports:

The world’s largest brewer will ask investors on April 26 in Brussels to approve Olivier Goudet, chief financial officer of Mars Inc., and Paul Cornet de Ways Ruart as directors for a four-year term, according to the convening notice published on the company’s website. Goudet and Cornet will replace Jean-Luc Dehaene and Arnoud de Pret on AB InBev’s board, which will have 12 members following the departure of Busch.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, via the Associated Press, reports that the move is unrelated to the negative publicity surrounding Busch since the death of his girlfriend from a drug overdose late last year.

Busch's board seat was always considered a courtesy after Anheuser-Busch was sold to InBev in 2008, as InBev's board went to 13 seats from 12 previously. It will now revert to 12. Busch's term had always been scheduled to end next month, the newspaper said.

 

Updated 3:29 p.m. Feb. 10, 2011:

Prosecuting Attorney Robert P. McCulloch announced today that Martin had lethal levels of both oxycodone and cocaine in her blood when she died, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports. He said that neither Martin nor Busch had a prescription for the oxycodone.

  • Missouri prison officials are preparing for the state's first execution in almost two years. Martin Link is scheduled to die by lethal injection shortly after midnight Wednesday. Link received the death penalty after being convicted for the kidnapping, rape and murder of 11-year-old Elissa Self in 1991. The state will use the last of its supply of sodium thiopental in the execution. Sodium thiopental is an anesthetic and the first of three drugs used in Missouri's lethal injection process.
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Toxicology results for Adrienne Martin are back, but officials with the St. Louis County Medical Examiner's office are still evaluating those results as they try to determine what killed her.

Martin was the girlfriend of former Anheuser-Busch CEO August Busch IV. She was found dead at his estate on Dec. 19.

Good morning! Here are some of today's starting headlines:

  • According to the St. Louis  Post- Dispatch, incoming Missouri speaker of the House Steve Tilley says he may refuse to seat a new representative from Kansas City because of allegations of voter fraud in the Democratic primary. Such a move is allowed under Missouri law, but is rare. The Post-Dispatch reports that Tilley was presented this month with a nearly 100 page document alleging widespread voter fraud from failed Democrat candidate Will Royster, who lost he primary in the 40th legislative district to John J. Rizzo by a single vote. Rizzo went on to win the general election against a Libertarian candidate. Tilley's move would cast a light on a a topic Republicans in Missouri have been pushing unsuccessfully for several years; the concept of requiring every voter to present a photo ID when voting. Rizzo called Royster's complaints "sour grapes."
  • Suburban St. Louis police have released a 911 call placed from the home of former Anheuser-Busch CEO August Busch IV earlier this month. A Busch employee called to report a woman who was "just not waking up " and who was later found dead at the home. She's been identified as 27-year-old Adrienne Martin. The cause of death has not been released. Frontenac Police Chief Thomas Becker also said Busch was at home at the time. Busch's lawyer has said there was nothing suspicious about the death.
  • Missouri lawmakers are again seeking ideas from the public for restructuring state government to cut costs. Las year, the Senate took a rare break from formal floor debates to consider ideas for restructuring stat government that were submitted by Missourians. Republican Senate leader Rob Mayer says he plans to do it again in the first weeks of the annual legislative session that starts next month. Mayer, of Dexter, says lawmakers need to consider any idea about how to cut spending. Ideas can be submitted anonymously online at a Senate Web page on rebooting state government.
  • 2011 will see some major work on the Eads Bridge over the Mississippi River. Metro, which owns the bridge, says time and weather have deteriorated the 136-year-old structure. Metro President John Nations says the agency will use $24.5 million in federal stimulus funds to replace and repair structural elements on the bridge, as well as apply a protective coating on the steel.

"We'll also be doing some improvements to our tracks in that area to also enhance our system. So it's going to be a big project and the region, I know, is interested in it. I actually get asked about it a lot simply because the Eads Bridge is such a big symbol for this region and for the Midwest. " - Nations

Nations says the road on the top deck of the Eads will have to be closed for two to three months while the work on the bridge takes place.

Updated 3:14 p.m. Dec. 23, 2010:

The Associated Press reports that the woman found in Busch's home has been identified.

Police and the St. Louis County medical examiner's office on Thursday identified the victim as Adrienne Martin of St. Charles.

An autopsy has been conducted but results could take 4-6 weeks.

St. Louis County forensic administrator Suzanne McCune says there were no signs of trauma.

From Earlier: