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Authors, Readers Prepare For Lit In The Lou

Oct 3, 2014

“St. Louis is kind of underappreciated as a literary city,” St. Louis author Ann Leckie said. “There’s the long history, but there’s also plenty of writers who are here now.”

That history, including authors like Maya Angelou and Tennessee Williams, and award-winning authors like Leckie are fueling next weekend’s Lit in the Lou festival.

Frank Blau Photography

This is the time of year when we begin to worry about severe weather. From thunderstorms to hail, high winds to tornados, we get more than our share. 

U.S. Department of Defense via Wikimedia Commons

Kenan Trebinčević was 11 years old when the Bosnian War arrived in his hometown of Brcko on May 1, 1992. He remembers going to buy bread at the store and being told by a neighbor not to come back because “pretty soon you Turks won’t need to be eating anymore.”

(Courtesy The Grannie Annie Family Story Celebration)

When families gather for the holidays, it can be an opportunity to tell stories and pass on memories. For the St. Louis-based Grannie Annie Family Story Celebration, that provides a possible treasure trove for young people to build writing skills and forge strong family bonds.

Every year, The Grannie Annie publishes a volume of family stories written by students in the fourth to the eighth grade.

(Courtesy Amy Tan)

Recorded Saturday, November 16 at the St. Louis County Library.

Amy Tan, author of The Joy Luck Club and other novels centered on the mother-daughter relationship, visited St. Louis as part of a tour for her new book, The Valley of Amazement.

In front of an audience of several hundred fans, she spoke with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh about the novel, her writing, her life, and her belief in ghosts.

Kevin O'Connor Rutland Herald

After years of going on vacations and dreaming of living in the places they visited, St. Louis native Ellen Stimson and her family decided to move to rural Vermont to be close to the mountains.

They bought a country store, decided to homeschool their youngest son, and began raising chickens. And soon learned that vacationing in Vermont is much different than living there.

Laurie Roberts Porter / (Courtesy Penguin Group)

Thirty-one years after bestselling author Sue Grafton introduced the world to the fictional private eye Kinsey Millhone in A is for Alibi, fans of her books still eagerly await the next book in the series. W is for Wasted was published earlier this month, marking the 23rd letter in the alphabet and the 23rd book in the series.

Laura Nowlin
Provided by Ms. Nowlin

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Laura Nowlin woke up one night after a dream feeling utterly heartbroken.

The dream felt like an ending, she says.

And she thought to herself, “I’ve got to write the story that ends this way.”

Patricia and Fredrick McKissack
Wiley Price | St. Louis American

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Col. Hardenbergh noted the birth of another slave with the same indifference he might have shown a calf or lamb.

The line from Sojourner Truth: Ain’t I a Woman, the fictionalized account of the life of a freed slave who became an abolitionist, embodies the crisp, enthralling style of Patricia McKissack and her husband, Fredrick McKissack.

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