baby formula

Possible infant formula-related illness
12:09 pm
Fri December 23, 2011

FDA, CDC say bacterial infections not linked to infant formula

(via Flickr/brokinhrt2)

Updated to reflect new information released by the FDA and CDC on Friday, Dec. 30.

A joint statement released Friday by the  Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says their investigation has found no evidence linking four recent cases of Cronobacter infection in infants to Enfamil or any other infant formula.

According to the statement, there is no evidence that four recent cases of Cronobacter infection in infants in four states - Missouri, Illinois, Florida, and Oklahoma - are related. The infants in Missouri and Florida died as a result of their infection, while the infants in Illinois and Oklahoma have survived.

The statement says there is no need for a recall of infant formula and that parents may continue to use powdered infant formula following the manufacturer’s directions on the printed label.

The ongoing investigation includes laboratory testing of various types of infant formula, the water used in preparing the formula, and when available, clinical samples from the infants.

More from Friday's FDA-CDC statement:

"The ongoing investigation includes laboratory testing of various types and brands of powdered infant formula, nursery water and, when available, clinical samples from the infants. The investigation also includes the inspection of manufacturing facilities for infant formula and nursery water.

The following results have been confirmed from completed laboratory tests, although additional lab results are pending release:

  • CDC’s laboratory conducted DNA fingerprinting of the bacteria from two recent cases of Cronobacter infection in infants (Missouri and Illinois). The results show that the Cronobacter bacteria differ genetically, suggesting that they are not related. (Bacteria from cases in Oklahoma and Florida are not available for analysis.) 
  • CDC laboratory tests of samples provided by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services found Cronobacter bacteria in an opened container of infant formula, an opened bottle of nursery water and prepared infant formula.  It is unclear how the contamination occurred.
  • The FDA tested factory sealed containers of powdered infant formula and nursery water with the same lot numbers as the opened containers collected from Missouri and no Cronobacter bacteria were found."

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