Barnes-Jewish Hospital

Dr. William Chapman, surgical director of Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Transplant Center
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

April is National Donate Life Month, a time to remember the importance of organ and tissue donation, as more than 123,000 people are currently awaiting organ transplants in the United States.

Rachel Lippmann I St. Louis Public Radio

Back in May, hundreds of former employees of the old Jewish Hospital gathered at the complex  along Kingshighway to say goodbye. Three of the four  buildings - some of which were built in the early 1900s - were schedule to come down as part of a multi-million dollar project to upgrade the Barnes-Jewish medical facilities.

(via Wikimedia Commons)

With this winter’s prolific snowfalls, slippery streets and biting cold aren’t the only dangers to be concerned about. According to cardiologist Andrew Kates, people should also think twice about shoveling snow if they aren’t accustomed to exercise. That’s because shoveling snow can cause heart attacks.

Judy Schmidt, James Gathany, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

In the past few weeks, the St. Louis region has seen a dramatic increase in the number of flu cases. The dangerous H1N1 strand that appeared in 2009 is back, and nine people have already died of the illness at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.  

via Wikimedia Commons

Officials at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis say nine people have died from the H1N1 flu virus, also known as swine flu, over the past six weeks. Another 35 patients were sick enough to be treated in the hospital’s intensive care unit, although, many were transported from outside the area.

Infectious Disease Physician Steven Lawrence says those who died ranged in age from their mid-20s to their mid-60s.

(Courtesy Barnes-Jewish Hospital)

Caring for people experiencing pain and suffering day in and day out can be trying for nurses and other healthcare professionals. Especially when they feel like the work is never done. That feeling is called compassion fatigue and at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, they've developed a program to help.

Some might equate compassion fatigue with burnout, but it is more complex than that, said Pat Potter, director of research and compassion fatigue program developer at Barnes-Jewish.

(Rachel Lippmann, St. Louis Public Radio)

On May 16, 1901, workers laid the cornerstone for a new hospital committed to caring for the St. Louis Jewish community when other institutions wouldn’t.

Exactly 26 years later, on May 16, 1927, officials gathered to dedicate the first building of a new Jewish Hospital at the corner of Kingshighway and Forest Park. The complex would eventually become part of Barnes-Jewish Hospital following a 1995 merger.

(via Wikimedia Commons/Bluelion)

Updated 10:15 a.m. March 27 to note that one building of the old Jewish Hospital complex will remain.

A planned expansion of the Barnes-Jewish medical complex could be underway later this year, now that the city has given its initial approval.

The Preservation Board last night gave BJC HealthCare the go-ahead to demolish four buildings at the corner of Kingshighway and Forest Park. They'll be replaced by nearly one million new square feet of medical space, including an addition to Children's Hospital.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

In 2010, the slumping state budget forced the Missouri Department of Mental Health to close the emergency room and 50 short-term beds at the Metropolitan Psychiatric Center.

The move saved $16 million. But it also forced those in need of immediate mental health treatment into local hospitals, which are not designed for those in crisis.

With the help of the area’s two largest hospital systems and some state support, there are now 16 beds available for patients with psychiatric needs who have already been screened at other hospital emergency rooms. Beginning this fall, patients needing urgent mental health care should be able to go straight to the new Psychiatric Stabilization Center.

The PSC is a temporary fix - but its creators are also hoping it helps shift the treatment paradigm.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Federal government will not fund reservoir repairs

The federal government has rejected a request from Ameren Missouri to receive stimulus funds for rebuilding the Taum Sauk reservoir that ruptured in 2005.

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