baseball

Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

With the home opener one week away, Cardinals fans should be prepared for ramped-up security at Busch Stadium and allow extra time to walk through new metal detectors at all gates.

Unlike at the airport, fans won’t have to take off their shoes and belts. But they will have to put their keys, cell phones and metal objects on tables when they pass through the detectors, says Joe Abernathy, vice president of stadium operations.

Bill Greenblatt / UPI

A few years ago, Mike Matheny was coaching a youth baseball team. He wrote what has become known as the Matheny Manifesto, a letter to his team’s parents. “I always said that the only team I would coach would be a team of orphans,” the letter began before asking parents to butt out of coaching.

Wayne Pratt, St. Louis Public Radio

He's won Emmy awards and been enshrined into the broadcast wing of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Now he has his very own star.

Former Major League Baseball player Tim McCarver was inducted Monday into the St. Louis Walk of Fame. He was a stalwart on Cardinals teams of the 1960s and was named an All-Star twice.

"I've never had anything, any Walk of Fame, anywhere," McCarver told St. Louis Public Radio. "This is really something."

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Football season is over. The Cardinals are still in Spring Training. St. Louis has no NBA to entertain us. The Olympics were fun while they lasted, but they took St. Louis Blues hockey away from us (until Wednesday). And we still don’t have a Major League Soccer team here. It's fair to say, the region is in a bit of a professional sports slump right now. And what have we been doing to endure the lull?

(Courtesy of Arthur Schwartz)

When Arthur Schwartz was 10 years old his parents gave him a newspaper clipping – a poem about the 1946 World Series in which the St. Louis Cardinals beat the Boston Red Sox.

After hearing our recent program on a new book about the 1946 World Series, Schwartz contacted us about the poem he memorized as kid, 67 years ago. 

File Photo | St. Louis Cardinals

As the Cardinals excel on the field, so too does the city and region around it. Postseason action has almost become a way of life in St. Louis, bringing added excitement, tourism and tax dollars to the region,  10 out of the past 13 years.

And this year is no different, says Mayor Francis Slay. With three World Series games scheduled here, the region will gain an estimated $8 million in direct and indirect revenue per game. The city alone will gain $500,000 in taxes per game.

(Via Wikimedia Commons)

A lot has changed in the world of baseball since 1946. But a familiar pair of elite teams are once again playing in the Fall Classic.  For the fourth time, the St. Louis Cardinals are facing off against the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. Previous matchups took place in 1946, 1967 and 2004.

And this year's matchup has some striking similarities to the team's first meeting in 1946. Then, as now, St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Dodgers in playoffs before facing off against the Red Sox.

(Courtesy: The Publishers, PublicAffairs)

Baseball and St. Louis go together like beer and brats, and the relationship between the city and sport began more than 130 years ago.

Chris Von der Ahe, a German grocer and beer-garden proprietor, risked his life savings in the 1880s, when he founded the franchise that would become today’s St. Louis Cardinals.

As author Edward Achorn describes in his newest book, Von der Ahe knew little about baseball but would become one of the most important and amusing figures in the game’s history.

As a new season of Major League Baseball begins, one photographer focuses on baseballs past — that is, baseballs that have lain dormant well after their last pitch.

For years, photographer Don Hamerman walked his dog near an old baseball diamond in Stamford, Conn. And in all different seasons, in all kinds of weather, Hamerman picked up old baseballs.

He brought them back to his studio, where they sat around for years until he finally decided to start photographing them in 2005.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

We know the question, unquestionably, in many Cardinals fans' heads right now is something like this:

"What? Number FIVE? We're number one!"

Well, Cardinals pride aside, the Redbirds' home turf has been rated as the number 5 best ballpark in America by TripAdvisor.

The site lists Busch between Fenway Park in Boston and Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia. The number one spot for major league baseball in the country? PNC Park in Pittsburgh.

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