beer

Brewing tank outside The Schlafly Tap Room in downtown St. Louis.
Wayne Pratt|St. Louis Public Radio

The increasingly competitive craft beer sector has at least two high-profile St. Louis companies looking to make inroads in Chicago, one of the largest markets in North America.

Urban Chestnut and Schlafly recently struck separate distribution deals to start selling in Chicago, which the Brewers Association says is the third largest overall beer market in the country.

Sauce Magazine executive editor Ligaya Figueras called the cheeseburger at Death in the Afternoon in St. Louis one of her most memorable meals of 2014.
Carmen Troesser / Sauce Magazine

Looking back on 2014, Sauce Magazine's editor and restaurant critics shared their favorite new restaurants, meals and drinks.

Best New Restaurants

Restaurant critic Michael Renner picked Peacemaker Lobster and Crab. Chef-owner Kevin Nashan imports fresh seafood daily. "He's brining in Maryland crabs. He's bringing in Maine lobster," Renner told "Cityscape" host Steve Potter.

Restaurant critic Matt Berkley chose Planter's House.

Véronique LaCapra / St. Louis Public Radio

Forget the stereotypes of beer-swilling men and frat boys. Femme Ferment and The University of Missouri–St. Louis want to introduce women and students to the art of brewing.

Fourth-year PhD chemistry student and homebrewer Joseph Meisel will lead UMSL’s new beer brewing class, Chemistry 1021 Beer Brewing: Chemical and Biochemical Principles.

Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio

Watch how manufacturing beer at Anheuser-Busch's St. Louis brewery (making 15 million barrels a year) looks different from Perennial Artisan Ales's microbrewery in south city.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The beer industry has been transformed by the rise of craft brews in recent years, and St. Louis is no exception; it’s home to microbreweries like Schlafly, Four Hands, and Urban Chestnut.

Now St. Louis mainstay Anheuser-Busch, after being bought by Inbev, is pushing to retain its dominance in the U.S. among a new generation of beer connoisseurs—people like Jeff Wolf and Kelly McKee.

(via Flickr/Mooganic)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) Wednesday signed eight bills into law that were passed this year by Missouri lawmakers.

Veronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

Legislation that would allow home brewers to bring home-made beer to festivals has passed the Missouri Senate.

Under Senate Bill 114, home-brewers could give away free samples to guests at beer festivals and tastings, but would not be allowed to sell them.  The sponsor, State Senator Eric Schmitt (R, Glendale), says an emergency clause was added so that home brewers can take part in this year’s Brewer’s Heritage Festival in St. Louis.

Ommegang Brewery

Brewery Ommegang in upstate New York is famous for making a kind of dark, malty, Belgian beer, often with high alcohol content.

This style of beer has become increasingly popular among craft-beer makers—including local brands such as Schlafly, Urban Chestnut and Perennial.  

Phil Leinhart is Ommegang’s head brewmaster.  Leinhart is in St. Louis to provide a tasting of specialty beers this Saturday at Urban Chestnut’s second annual Wolpertinger Anniversary festival..

Anheuser-Busch InBev

Budweiser Black Crown, the latest of Anheuser-Busch's higher-alcohol beers, will hit shelves across the country on Monday.  The beer has been sold in St. Louis for several weeks now.

The new recipe is the result of a challenge, called “Project 12” among the company’s 12 brewmasters.

The new take on classic Bud features a stronger hop flavor and higher alcohol content, about 6 percent.

Benj Steinman, editor of Beer Marketer’s Insights says the move comes as mass-market brands face increasing pressure from craft beer, wine and spirits.

The holidays are finally wrapping up. So after you repack the twinkly lights, and the tinsel goes into the trash, what should you do with that once beautiful spruce standing in your living room? Why not drink it?

Well, not exactly as is. The needles, shoots, light-green tips and inner bark of the popular conifer have been used for centuries to brew forest-scented tea, soft drinks and beer. And it seems that fresh evergreen flavor may be making a comeback.

The world isn't going to end next Friday, but Dec. 21, 2012, has come to be known as the Mayan apocalypse because that's when the Mayan calendar ends. As scientists have told us repeatedly, the end of the calendar year was actually a time for celebration and renewal — the equivalent of an ancient New Year's Eve. So breweries around the country have decided to celebrate with — what else? — beer.

Scientists may have finally solved a problem that has plagued beer drinkers for ages: Insufficient foam resiliency.

As any beer drinker can tell you, a tall glass of lager without a white, foamy head on top just doesn't look right. And even if you start out with one, it can dissipate fast. And that's just sad.

Now, microbiologists have identified the specific gene in yeast responsible for a beer's head and they say this discovery can lead to stronger, longer lasting, more aesthetically pleasing foam on your favorite brews.

There's a little-known part of the White House website that allows average citizens to create online petitions. And in amongst the weighty requests to end police brutality and allow prescription drugs to be imported, a little item caught our eye: "Release the recipe for the Honey Ale home brewed at the White House."

via Wikimedia Commons

The world's largest brewer is getting even bigger. Anheuser-Busch InBev announced plans early on Friday to buy a remaining 50 percent of the Mexican brewing giant, Grupo Modelo, for $20 billion.  

The purchase will give A-B InBev complete control of the company and access to Modelo’s popular Corona, Modelo, Negra Modelo and Pacifico brands.

Speaking in a conference call Modelo CEO Carlos Fernandez says the move is necessary step to export his brands around the globe.

Change has been the story of the season for the Miami Marlins, formerly the Florida Marlins. With a new coach, a new name, new team colors and a new stadium the baseball team set a franchise record for winning games in May.

But one tradition isn't changing anytime soon: beer. Ordering a beer at a baseball game is as American as apple pie. So is forking over a small fortune for that beer.

According to an analysis by TheStreet.com, the most expensive beer of any baseball stadium is sold at the new Marlins Park, where baseball fans pay $8 for a Bud Light draft.

(via William K Busch Brewing Company)

If you've been driving on any of the highways around St. Louis lately you have probably noticed several new green billboards advertising Kräftig beer. Kräftig is brewed by the William K Busch Brewing Company, a new brewery started by Billy Busch, the great grandson of Adolphus Busch. As David Weinberg reports, Billy Busch is hoping his new business is start of the next chapter in the Busch family brewing legacy.

(via Flickr/Bernt Rostad)

"Chicago's Craft Beer" is the tagline gracing the top of the website of Goose Island Beer Co., but, with an announcement today involving St. Louis fixture Anheuser-Busch, that tagline of origin may become a little muddled.