Bill Enyart

St. Louis County Executive-elect Steve Stenger talks to St. Louis Public Radio reporters Nov. 5, 2014, during a recording of the 'Politically Speaking' podcast.
Chris McDaniel / St. Louis Public Radio

Wednesday on “St. Louis on the Air,” we gathered our political reporters to recap Tuesday’s election. The consensus: Republicans ruled the night.

“It was a Republican bloodbath, nationally and regionally,” said Jo Mannies, St. Louis Public Radio political reporter. “But it also shows that St. Louis County is definitely Democratic turf because the only two Democratic candidates — big names — who remained standing were Steve Stenger and Jill Schupp.”

State Rep. Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro, talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on Oct. 16, 2014, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Rebecca Smith / St. Louis Public Radio

State Rep. Mike Bost rode the national Republican wave to victory Tuesday night, knocking off incumbent U.S. Rep. Bill Enyart to represent parts of the Metro East in Congress. 

Bost’s victory capped off a buoyant night for Republicans nationally and in the Land of Lincoln, where Republican Bruce Rauner unseated incumbent Gov. Pat Quinn.

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, a Democrat, won re-election.

(Provided by: Paula Bradshaw)

“People in America don’t understand that our monetary supply is debt based. They think it comes from taxes,” Paula Bradshaw explained. “Taxes are just the [Government’s] way of getting money back from people that’s already in circulation.”

Paula Bradshaw, an emergency room registered nurse who lives in Carbondale, is the Green Party’s candidate to represent Illinois’ 12th congressional district. It’s her second time contesting the seat. In 2012, she received nearly 6 percent of the vote.

State Rep. Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro, talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on Oct. 16, 2014, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Rebecca Smith / St. Louis Public Radio

While the leading candidates for one of the nation’s most competitive Congressional races agreed that the economy and jobs were the top issue facing the 12th Congressional District.

In back-to-back interviews Thursday on “St. Louis on the Air,” state Rep. Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro, and U.S. Rep. Bill Enyart, D-Belleville, made their cases for the seat, which encompasses portions of the Metro East and southern Illinois, but clashed on whether climate change is real.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

On a late September day in Granite City, U.S. Rep. Bill Enyart was in his element. He was presenting a big ceremonial check to Chestnut Health Systems, symbolizing a grant to help homeless veterans.

While standard fare for members of Congress, these kinds of events represent a big change of pace for Enyart, who was the leader of the Illinois National Guard before he ran for Illinois’ 12th congressional district seat in 2012.

Illinois state Rep. Mike Bost's impassioned floor speech from 2012 is getting some attention. Democrats are using it to paint him as an ill-tempered extremist, while Republicans say it showcases his passion for his constituents.
Mike Bost's campaign

On the surface, Mike Bost and Moses don’t have that much in common. But some not-so-flattering political ads may create a different impression.

Bost – a Republican state representative from Murphysboro – is engaged in a highly competitive race against U.S. Rep. Bill Enyart, D-Belleville, for the 12th congressional district seat. It’s become vigorous enough to force the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee to spend lots of money to paint Bost in a bad light.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

The second-ranking Democrat in the U.S. House was in Granite City, Ill. on Wednesday to boost his longstanding focus on bolstering manufacturing jobs. 

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin knows firsthand the difficulty in getting a minimum wage increase passed through a legislative body. 

The Illinois Democrat was unsuccessful in getting the U.S. Senate to increase the federal minimum wage this year. Even if Senate Republicans hadn’t filibustered that effort, it would likely have gone nowhere in the GOP-controlled House.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Illinois’ higher education, business and political leaders are pledging cooperation for an effort to bring manufacturing jobs to the region. 

U.S. Rep. Bill Enyart, D-Belleville, convened a day-long manufacturing summit at Mid-America Airport in Mascoutah. It was aimed at presenting a united front for southern Illinois to compete for manufacturing jobs.

(via Flickr/[sic])

(Updated 3:50 p.m. Tuesday, June 3)

Within minutes after the Environmental Protection Agency announced its proposed regulations for coal-fired power plants, U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt blasted the decision as a “unprecedented power grab.”

Blunt followed through on Tuesday by co-sponsoring a bill, called the “Coal Country Protection Act,’’ that would allow carbon-emissions limits to go into effect only if other federal agencies could guarantee that no jobs would be lost, electricity rates wouldn’t go up, and the nation’s economy wouldn’t be hurt.

(Flickr/Paul Sable)

The price of steel pipes and tubes are at the center of a rally in Granite City Friday afternoon.

It's one of six rallies planned around the U.S. this spring. The goal is to bring attention to what steelworkers and steel companies say are unfair trade practices by companies in nine countries.

The products are Oil Country Tubular Goods, used in natural gas and oil exploration, an industry that has boomed in the U.S. in recent years.

(WikepediaCommons)

In the wake of the U.S. House vote on the federal budget, and looking ahead to the delayed vote for the Farm Bill and the future defense budget, Illinois Congressman Bill Enyart (D - Belleville) spoke with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh yesterday by phone.

Here's what he had to say on a few subjects.

On his vote for the 2014 budget proposal, which passed in the House December 12.

(via Enyart's campaign)

Will be updated.

Southern Illinois Congressman Bill Enyart officially announced Tuesday that he's running for re-election.

The announcement is a formality as Enyart already shared  his intentions back in May.

Enyart, 64, made two stops Tuesday to share the news, one in his home-base of Belleville, Ill. and another in Carbondale, Ill.  

(WikepediaCommons)

Democratic Congressman Bill Enyart is frustrated with the partial government shutdown.

Enyart, who represents areas of Southern Illinois and East St. Louis, supports a continuing resolution that would allow the National Guard to be paid and put the VA and 70 percent of the CIA back to work. A veteran with over 35 years of military service, Enyart contends that the best way to support the troops is to reopen the government.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Illinois Congressman Bill Enyart is announcing new legislation to support biofuels used in the military.

At a Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville research center, the first-term Democrat outlined his legislation, which would incentivize the use of biofuels in the Air Force through competitive research grants.

Speaking next to leaders of farm and ethanol groups, Enyart announced the legislation just a couple miles from Scott Air Force Base.

(Illinois General Assembly website)

A longtime Illinois state lawmaker says he's running for a southern Illinois congressional seat.

State Rep. Mike Bost of Murphysboro won't seek re-election in the state's 115th District and instead will pursue the 12th Congressional District seat. 

The Republican has been a state lawmaker for 18 years.

The U.S. House seat Bost will pursue is held by Democrat Bill Enyart, who was elected last November and announced in May he'll be seeking another two-year term.

The 12th District stretches from the Illinois suburbs of St. Louis to the state's southernmost tip.

(via Enyart's campaign)

A freshman Democratic congressman for southwestern Illinois' 12th Congressional District says he'll be running for a second term.

The Belleville News-Democrat reports that Rep. Bill Enyart's office made the announcement Monday, just six months into his first term.

Enyart is a Belleville attorney who last November won the seat long held by Democrat Jerry Costello, who retired after more than two decades in office.

The 12th Distict stretches from the Illinois suburbs of St. Louis to the state's southernmost tip.

(Chris McDaniel/St. Louis Public Radio)

Illinois Congressman Bill Enyart was one of only 24 Democrats who voted in favor of the U.S. House's failed Farm Bill on Thursday.

Enyart, who sits on the House Agriculture Committee, supported the bill despite some misgivings but said he is disappointed in the bill’s failure.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

According to the Center for Investigative Reporting, the wait time for veterans to receive benefits has skyrocketed from 116 days in 2009 to 330 days now. In response, US Representative Bill Enyart is sponsoring legislation to try to reduce that wait.

What the bill would do is pay partial, provisional benefits for veterans whose cases aren't handled within 125 days after they are submitted. Currently, that would apply to more than half a million veterans.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Two freshman Congressmen from southern Illinois want the Army Corps of Engineers to start thinking of ways it can coordinate management of the Mississippi River to keep cargo traffic flowing during droughts or floods.

"The bill would have the Corps treat the entire drainage system as one entity," said Democrat Bill Enyart, a co-sponsor along with Republican Rodney Davis. "How do you balance someone getting to go boating against being able to get barges full of soybeans and corn out to feed the world? As it stands today, we can't balance those."

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