biological clock

biology
3:00 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Daylight Saving Time: More Trouble Than It's Worth?

Credit (via Flickr/the Italian voice)

If you’re feeling tired due to the daylight savings shift, you’re not alone. One researcher at Washington University says the time change may cause more problems than it solves.

Erik Herzog studies the biological clocks of mammals. He says several studies have shown that daylight saving is hard on us humans, especially the “spring ahead.” Effects like sleep deprivation result in increased traffic accidents for three days after the time change.

Herzog says the effect in the fall is the opposite – there are fewer traffic accidents – but that effect lasts only one day.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:18 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

The Battle Between Your Body Clock And The Mechanical Clock

Our internal clock is in tune with the cycle of night and day.
(via Flikr/Stephen Bowler)

It's not easy to adjust to a new time zone or work schedule. Our body has a natural sleep/wake cycle and disruptions to it can lead to more than just feeling tired or exhausted.

Washington University professors Paul Gray and Erik Herzog are studying the biology behind our daily internal clock, or circadian rhythm. Sometimes referred to as the body or biological clock, Herzog defined it as "the entity within the body that synchronizes with an environmental cycle." This is not to be confused with the biological clock some refer to when thinking of a woman's desire to conceive. 

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