Brian Nieves

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Bob Onder completed his comeback into state legislative life with a victory in the hard-fought – and expensive – contest for the 2nd District state Senate seat. 

The Lake Saint Louis Republican's win capped off a relatively light slate of legislative races -- as well as some unusually active local contests.

(Missouri House of Representatives website)

State Sen. Brian Nieves may be quitting Jefferson City, but he’s not quitting politics.

Nieves, R-Washington, filed Monday for Franklin County recorder of deeds. He’s among four Republicans and one Democrat seeking to succeed incumbent Sharon Birkman, who is not seeking re-election.  The Republicans will compete in the August primary.

The post pays $67,215 a year.

En route to Jefferson City, Nieves confirmed via text that he had filed for the job. He said he would have additional comments later.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, has announced that he’s not running for the Missouri state Senate – setting the table for a possible candidacy by former state Sen. Jane Cunningham.

Jones and Cunningham, R-Chesterfield, have been touted as likely candidates after state Sen. Brian Nieves, R-Washington, made the surprise announcement that he’s not seeking re-election to his 26th District seat.

Tim Bommel, Mo. House of Representatives

(Updated 1:50 p.m. Friday, March 14)

State Sen. Brian Nieves, R-Washington, has dropped his bid for re-election – ending two weeks of political suspense about his intentions.

Tim Bommel, Mo. House of Representatives

Until this week, most of the attention directed at state Sen. Brian Nieves, R-Washington, has focused on his outspoken conservatism and his efforts to block some federal gun laws.

But now the chief question is whether Nieves is preparing to quit the state Capitol.

Nieves said in two text messages this week, the latest on Friday, that he’s not yet ready to discuss the situation -- but many others are.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The National Rifle Association is taking some heat from two Missouri state senators over legislation to nullify federal gun control laws within the state.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate has given first-round approval to legislation to nullify federal gun-control laws.

Tim Bommel, Mo. House of Representatives

(Updated 12:40 p.m. Mon., Feb. 3)

Missouri state Sen. Brian Nieves says he didn't intend to ignite a controversy over freedom of the press with his mandate that cameras and recorders are welcome — but no tripods — during public meetings of the Senate committee that he chairs.

“You can videotape until your heart’s content,” said Nieves, R-Washington, in an interview. “I just don’t want the process of videotaping to block the view of anybody else.’’

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

Nixon Vetoes Nieves' So-Called 'Sharia-law Bill'

Jun 3, 2013
(via Wikimedia Commons)

Governor Jay Nixon vetoed legislation Monday that was aimed at curtailing foreign laws in Missouri. Although the bill didn’t explicitly say the word in its pages, detractors commonly referred to it as the “anti-Sharia law bill.”

Speaking in St. Louis at the Lutheran Family and Children’s Services, the Democratic governor referred to it as pointless “demagoguery.”

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