Cahokia Mounds

Verifying Discovery
4:06 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Cahokia Mounds Hosted Only Copper Works In North America

One of two Mississippian culture "birdman" repoussé copper plate found by John P. Rogan at the Etowah site in Alabama in 1883.
Credit Herb Roe | Wikipedia

Cahokia Mounds in Fairmont City attracts a diverse group of history buffs, who are visiting one of North America’s most important historic sites, and fitness enthusiasts, who enjoy the cardiovascular challenge of the steep steps that climb to the top of Monks Mound. That is the largest of the native earthworks in the Illinois state historic site.

If these stair-steppers would step a short way down the mown path that leads east from the parking lot next to the big mound, they could see history in the making – or in the rediscovering.

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Cahokia Mounds
5:28 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Meeting Wednesday Seeks To Build Support For Designating Cahokia As A National Park

Rising 100 feet above the ground, Monks Mound is the tallest of the 80 or so mounds remaining at the Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Illinois. Around 900 years ago, it was a carefully maintained earthen pyramid, supporting a large wooden temple.
Credit Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

A public meeting will be held Wednesday night at Cahokia Mounds to talk about an initiative to turn the State Historic Site into a National Historical Park.

Ed Weilbacher is with the HeartLands Conservancy, the group behind the initiative.

He said most people are surprised Cahokia isn’t a National Park already.

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St. Louis on the Air
8:03 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Efforts Underway To Enhance National Designation Of Cahokia Mounds

Rising 100 feet above the ground, Monks Mound is the tallest of the 80 or so mounds remaining at the Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Illinois. Around 900 years ago, it was a carefully maintained earthen pyramid, supporting a large wooden temple.
Véronique LaCapra / St. Louis Public Radio

Cahokia Mounds near Collinsville, contains mounds constructed by an ancient Mississippian people. Recent archeological discoveries made as a result of construction of the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge have highlighted the people who used to inhabit the area.

A group is now trying to bolster recognition of Cahokia and the rest of the mounds by gaining some type of national designation through the National Park Service.

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