Lydia Adams speaks during the public comment section of the Ferguson Commission meeting. Adams was one of numerous speakers who spoke during Monday's meeting, which took place in Ferguson.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Foundation for Health has announced that it will donate $6 million to address health issues raised by the Ferguson Commission last year. The priorities include gun violence, food insecurity and toxic stress.

Áine O'Connor

When mentioning author and philanthropist Cynthia Kagan Frohlichstein, the best word that comes to mind is “spunk.” You can spot her around town at different events, chatting and mingling, owning the crowd.

And frankly, she has much to celebrate.

Celebrating her 40th year of being cancer-free, Frohlichstein has not slowed down her attempts at showing the world that giving is as good as receiving. She’s written children’s books on the topic of “giving back” and life lessons in hopes that young people will carry the torch forward.

Bicyclist Phil Leachman donned turkey attire for Sunday's ninth annual Cranksgiving bike ride and food drive in Maplewood.
Stephanie Lecci

Bicycles, tricycles, recumbent cycles and tandems were lined up on the street in front of Schlafly Bottleworks in Maplewood on Sunday, but the sight of a man dressed helmet-to-pedal in a turkey costume made it obvious this wasn't a typical bike race.

Rather it was the ninth annual St. Louis "Cranksgiving" bike ride and food drive, sponsored by St. Louis BWorks. The non-profit offers free classes to help children learn about and earn a bicycle or a computer. 

(via Facebook/The Bridge St. Louis)

Original article published Saturday, January 18, 2013

Missourians are more likely to volunteer and to do favors for a neighbor than the average American. But their level of civic engagement depends greatly on their circumstances.

A new report on the state’s civic health, issued by six Missouri universities and the National Conference on Citizenship, found that Missouri largely aligns with the rest of the nation on community involvement.

St. Louis Beacon graphic | 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: There is still room for improvement, but financial penalties have turned out to be a powerful tool for persuading area hospitals to boost quality and safety.

Under the health reform law, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has begun subjecting hospitals to losses of up to 1 percent of their inpatient payments for Medicare services for having higher than acceptable 30-day readmission rates for heart attacks, heart failure and pneumonia.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Other than obeying laws and being generally civil, are you obligated to ensure the economic success of others in society? Put another way, what determines your social responsibility? To answer that question, let’s first consider the issue of social responsibility at the personal level and then reflect on the social responsibility of business.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Panera Bread Co. has stopped offering its "meal of shared responsibility,” an initiative to combat food insecurity that had been introduced in March at its 48 St. Louis Bread Co. cafes. The program had allowed customers to set their own price for turkey chili served in a bread bowl.

Dr. Pat Wolff at a clinic.
Provided by Washington University

Dr. Patricia Wolff, founder and Executive Director of Meds & Foods for Kids (MFK) was one of our guests today on St. Louis on the Air.  MFK has been in Cap-Haïtien combating malnutrition with Medika Mamba (aka Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food)  since 2003.  Last year’s earthquake exacerbated an already extreme situation there, crippling existing infrastructure and multiplying demand for limited resources.

Flickr Creative Commons user Victim Public


As many Missourians wrap up a weekend marked by celebration and plenty, somewhere near 16% of the state's population struggles with food insecurity.

Though many may consider this the season of giving, do you ever wonder exactly how much of what you give actually gets used for its intended purpose?

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster released today a list of "Missouri's 15 Worst Charities." The list is based upon the percentage of the charity's total expenditures actually used for charitable purposes.