Children's Books | St. Louis Public Radio

Children's Books

Sidney Keys III, the founder of Books N Bros.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

If you Google the terms “boys and reading,” you will find thousands of results laying out the state of the gender gap between boys and girls when it comes to reading and literacy. “The Boys Have Fallen Behind,” writes Nicholas Kristof. “Why Women Read More than Men,” says NPR.

St. Louis County Library

A new local organization wants to get the conversation about race and racism started with a group you may not expect: young, white families in St. Louis. We Stories: Raising Big-Hearted Kids is using children’s literature to “create conversation, change and hope in St. Louis” with the aim of making St. Louis more inclusive.

Áine O'Connor

When mentioning author and philanthropist Cynthia Kagan Frohlichstein, the best word that comes to mind is “spunk.” You can spot her around town at different events, chatting and mingling, owning the crowd.

And frankly, she has much to celebrate.

Celebrating her 40th year of being cancer-free, Frohlichstein has not slowed down her attempts at showing the world that giving is as good as receiving. She’s written children’s books on the topic of “giving back” and life lessons in hopes that young people will carry the torch forward.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In Tom Angleberger's new book, things are going all wrong at McQuarrie Middle School. There's a new emphasis on standardized testing, and classes such as music, art and Legos are cut because of it. In "Surprise Attack of Jabba the Puppett," the group of kids that readers first met in "The Strange Case of Origami Yoda" have to work together again to figure out what's going on and how to fix it. They're guided, by the way, by a paper finger puppet Yoda.