Chris Koster

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 1:02 p.m. May 10 to reflect missing data has now been posted.

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has released more air sampling results for the Bridgeton Landfill.

According to a written summary on the DNR's website, the Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services analyzed the data collected from mid-March through April 23 and found unhealthy levels of sulfur dioxide at two sites near the landfill.

Beacon archives | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster announced Wednesday that court dates have been set for May 14 and 15 in St. Louis to “hear evidence’’ in a lawsuit that his office filed in late March against Republic Services, Inc., owner of the odor-generating Bridgeton landfill, under fire from its residential neighbors.

The landfill is also quite literally under fire, as a result of underground burning that continues.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When Chris Koster first ran for attorney general in 2008, the phrase "Koster the Imposter" was thrown around as commonly as promises to be tough on crime.

That's because Koster had made the unusual move of switching political parties. Some Missouri Democrats contended that Koster was an opportunist who didn't believe in the party's beliefs or principles. Consequently, Koster barely won a heated Democratic primary over state Reps. Margaret Donnelly and Jeff Harris, a contest in which his political convictions and Democratic credentials were constantly under attack.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Attorney General Chris Koster won’t appeal a federal court decision striking down a new state law that allows employers to exclude contraception, abortion or sterilization from insurance coverage.

Koster, a Democrat, asked the federal judge who wrote the decision to amend her ruling so that religious organizations could exclude contraceptive coverage if they’re exempt under federal law.

(Mo. Atty. General's Office)

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster says he is making preparations to run for governor in 2016.

Koster, a Democrat, has served as attorney general since 2009 and previously was a state senator and local prosecutor.  He has the potential to move up because Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon is prohibited by term limits from seeking re-election again.

Asked Tuesday by The Associated Press whether he will run for governor in 2016, Koster replied: "We are making the necessary preparations and building consensus around the state toward that end."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For residential neighbors long distressed over the smelly – and firey – Bridgeton landfill, Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster’s announcement that the state has filed suit against the landfill’s operator offered hope that the worst may be over.

But minutes later, Assistant Attorney General Jessica Blome inadvertently dispelled that notion by acknowledging short-term pain may come before any long-term gain.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's episode: The results from the mayoral primary are in. Why did Reed lose? Did Slay win by as much as he had hoped? Then Jo shares some stories from Democrat Days and we close it out with Lt. Governor Peter Kinder's lawsuit.

Mo. Gov. Nixon Spent $15.5M On Re-Election

Dec 7, 2012
(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon spent $15.5 million on his re-election campaign and still has hundreds of thousands of dollars left over.

Campaign finance reports released Thursday show Nixon's fundraising committee had a balance of nearly $414,000 at the start of December.

Nixon has changed his committee to indicate that he now is seeking an unspecified statewide office in 2016 and has given it a new name - "A Better Missouri With Governor Jay Nixon."

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A University City man who’s spent 30 years behind bars has been set free by a Cole County judge after his murder conviction was vacated.

(EdMartinForCongress.com screen capture/St. Louis Public Radio)

The next Attorney General of Missouri will be one of three men: Democratic incumbent Chris Koster, Libertarian Dave Browning, or Republican Ed Martin.  Host Don Marsh talks with Ed Martin.  He is an attorney and former Chief of Staff to Governor Matt Blunt.

Prior to running for Attorney General, Martin was vying for the U.S. Senate and the Second Congressional District.

Libertarian candidate Dave Browning was also a guest on this program.

(via Flickr/ Daniel Morrison)

Host Don Marsh talks with the Libertarian candidate for Missouri Attorney General Dave Browning.

Dave Browning said incumbent Chris Koster has done a decent job “but is an unrepentant liberal.”  He said Republican challenger Ed Martin doesn’t know what he’s doing.  “I think the voters of Missouri need to have a chance to vote for someone who is conservative but not insane,” said Browning.

(via Koster and Martin campaign ads)

In the race for Missouri Attorney General, the two front runners, Democratic incumbent Chris Koster and Republican Ed Martin, agree on few issues. In fact, the two have very different visions of what the Attorney General’s office actually does.

In campaign ads, Koster holds a shotgun to show he’s tough on crime. And in interviews, Koster often refers to the office as “Missouri’s top law enforcement job.”

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Bar has canceled its planned debate for the state Attorney General’s race.

The debate had been planned for Friday, October 19th, in St. Louis at the Missouri Bar’s annual meeting.  Spokeswoman Farrah Fite says they canceled the debate because Republican nominee Ed Martin did not RSVP by Thursday’s deadline.  She added that incumbent Democrat Chris Koster and Libertarian nominee Dave Browning had accepted the invitation.

(photo courtesy of the Landmarks Association of St. Louis)

Attorney General Chris Koster has sued a well-known St. Louis developer and his former business partner in an effort to recover tax credits that Koster says were fraudulently obtained.

In the suit filed today in Cole County, Koster alleges that in 2010 and 2011, the state Department of Economic Development awarded developers Kevin McGowan and Nathaniel Walsh nearly $2.4 million in brownfield credits to clean up lead paint at the Cupples 9 building in downtown St. Louis.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Isaac heads to St. Louis

Drought-stricken Missouri is preparing for what has been an unusual occurrence this summer - a couple of rainy days. Forecasters expect remnants of tropical storm Isaac to reach Missouri on Friday, with rain spreading over southern, central and eastern portions.

The National Weather Service says the St. Louis region could get 3 to 5 inches. Soaking rains are expected to help alleviate Missouri's drought but not break it. More than 97 percent of the state is now listed in the two most severe categories of drought.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

There will be no challenge to the new language inserted onto a ballot initiative by a Cole County judge regarding health insurance exchanges.

The version initially approved by Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) had asked if state law should, “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care,” unless the people or the legislature created an exchange.  In a statement, Carnahan says Attorney General Chris Koster (D) refused to file an appeal on her office’s behalf.  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) filed suit against Carnahan over that language.  He applauded the Democratic Attorney General’s move.

(via Flickr/jmerelo)

The Missouri Attorney General’s office has announced the state will get a share of multi-million dollar settlements from lawsuits against drug makers and book publishers.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Ameren monitoring Isaac

Officials with Ameren say they are closely monitoring Hurricane Isaac's progress now that it has made land fall. Projections from the National Weather Service indicate the remnants of the storm could pass over Missouri and Illinois this weekend.

Kevin Anders, Ameren Missouri's manager of distribution services, says that could mean a lot of rain and - potentially - some high winds or tornadoes.

(Mo. Atty. General's Office)

Late personal property tax payments have emerged in another Missouri political campaign.

County tax records show Attorney General Chris Koster paid late three times, most recently in 2009. Personal property taxes typically are due at the end of the calendar year. In each instance, Koster paid the tax bill for his vehicle in January.

The total for the late tax charges was less than $200. In addition, Koster was charged $70 for a late personal property assessment from 2008 while paying the tax timely that year.

Mo. Atty. Gen. office

The latest scam designed to separate Missouri residents from their money involves phony letters from the State Attorney General’s office, the IRS and other government agencies.

The letters include a fake government letterhead, and state that the recipient has won a million dollars or more in prize money.  Attorney General Chris Koster (D) says the intended victims are then informed that they owe thousands of dollars in taxes and fees on the winnings and are instructed to pay them via Western Union.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Illinois to offer programs for those affected by drought

Gov. Pat Quinn says Illinois will offer an array of debt restructuring and loan programs to farmers and ranchers affected by the drought. He visited a family farm in the southern Illinois area Monday, where much of the corn crop is wilting.

Quinn says the state has also launched a website to help.

(Propofol: Wikimedia commons, Gurney: via Wikimedia Commons/Noahudlis, Needle: Flickr via prashant_zi)

Missouri is the first state in the nation to change its protocol for executing prisoners from a three-drug cocktail to the single drug Propofol. The switch is due to a shortage of a key drug, which has stalled lethal injections across the country.

Other states may eventually follow Missouri’s lead, but as St. Louis Public Radio’s Joseph Leahy reports, the drug known recently for killing pop star Michael Jackson is no silver bullet either.

"I just thought it was a good idea"

(Mo. Atty. General's Office)

Will be updated.

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich is questioning the process for awarding contracts to private attorneys representing the state in lawsuits.

The attorney general's office can award contingency fee contracts by requesting bids or asking the state Office of Administration to request bids and establish an independent panel to choose the winner.

(via Flickr/denharsh)

The Missouri Attorney General’s office is warning the public of a new scam that’s targeting smartphone and cellphone users.

The scam is known as "smishing," and it involves text messages telling recipients that they’ve won prizes or gift cards from big-name retailers such as Wal-Mart or Costco and instructs them to claim them by clicking on a link.  Attorney General Chris Koster (D) says clicking the link will infect phones with malware that gives identity thieves access to personal information.

St. Louis Public Radio

A Republican candidate for Missouri attorney general says the office must do more to help veterans and those serving in the military.

St. Louis attorney Ed Martin is calling out incumbent Chris Koster for not making veteran’s mental health care a top priority.

“We have coming a tsunami of men and women," he said, "who are facing serious mental health PTSD issues and to not acknowledge it is to be making a terrible mistake and disrespecting our priorities.”

(via Flickr/teejay)

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster says the state's Medicaid program will receive about $42,000 from a national legal settlement with Walgreen Co.

The settlement resolves complaints that Walgreen's improperly tried to get people to switch their prescriptions to its pharmacies. The company has agreed to pay civil damages totaling $7.9 million to states and the federal government.

Koster says that from early 2005 to June 2010, Walgreen Co. offered gift cards and gift checks to people who receive government health care to entice them to transfer their prescriptions.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is urging the State Supreme Court to set execution dates for 19 death sentences. Koster says no legal barrier is barring the high court from moving forward with the executions. 

Koster says 10 cases of capital punishment have already been awaiting execution dates for over 3 years. He gave the court an additional 9 names today and says there is no legal ground for delaying punishment.

(Released by Mo. Atty. Gen. Chris Koster)

The details of proposals to improve or change the Edward Jones Dome have been kept secret - until today.

Last week, Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster said he would release the details of the proposals, in response to an open records request, and he's done so.

Attorney General Chris Koster has filed a consent decree to address environmental violations at Doe Run’s Sweetwater Mine and Mill in Reynolds County.

Here's a map detailing the approximate location of the mine near Ellington, Mo.:

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Study: Corps made the right choice in breaching Birds Point

A new study says the Army Corps of Engineers made the right choice when it blew up a southeast Missouri levee last year.

Study co-author Ken Olson, a professor of soil sciences at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urban,a says river levels continued to rise even after the Birds Point-New Madrid Floodway was breached by explosives to relieve flooding pressure on Cairo, Ill.

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