City of St. Louis

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Updated 2:19 p.m. This live chat was from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. CT on June 10. Thanks for joining us!

This weekend - with the publishing of an opinion piece  in the New York Times entitled "Loving the Midwest," St. Louisans, once again, showed their concern with how the Gateway City is viewed and portrayed on the national level.

Slay Says STL-TV Is Luxury City Can't Afford

May 12, 2013
St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will resume discussions next week of the city’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The budget presented to the board by Mayor Francis Slay totals $985 million.

Among the cuts to the budget that Slay is proposing includes essentially eliminating the city’s cable TV channel, known as STL-TV.

The cut was rejected by the board of estimate and apportionment, but Slay says he remains confident that the Board of Aldermen will see that STL-TV is a luxury the city can’t afford.

(via Flickr/ChrisYunker)

Visitors to Forest Park can expect to see some upgrades over the next five years, thanks to an agreement signed Friday between the city of St. Louis and Forest Park Forever.

(via Flickr/functoruser)

The Missouri Court of Appeals heard oral arguments today in constitutional challenges to three red light camera ordinances in the St. Louis area.

(via Flickr/taberandrew)

Updated at 4:52 p.m. to correct judge's name.

A judge in St. Louis city has halted enforcement of the city's new foreclosure mediation ordinance.

Robert Dierker issued the temporary restraining order today, which prohibits any city officials from enforcing the ordinance. Dierker does take care to note that voluntary participation in mediation is still allowed.  A hearing on a preliminary injunction is scheduled for March 20.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Non-profits who want to influence political races in the city of St. Louis may soon have to disclose their donors.

A bill that would force those organizations who put more than $500 into a contest for mayor, comptroller, Board of Aldermen president or a ballot issue sailed out of committee today with a 6-0 vote. Five of the 11 committee members were absent, and a quorum wasn't reached until just before the vote.

Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

The city of St. Louis has beefed up the number of attorneys targeting problem properties in the city.

Private lawyers from firms throughout St. Louis, working for free, will supplement the efforts of city attorneys to take the owners of those properties to court.

Those are the buildings that are so structurally unsound they pose a safety risk, or where police get numerous complaints of nuisance crimes.

Asian carp solution will have downstream impact

Sep 17, 2012
Kelly Martin / Via Wikimedia Commons

The issue of keeping Asian carp out of the Great Lakes has implications for a variety of industries.  Midwest officials are weighing a range of options, including severing the connection between the Mississippi River and Great Lakes basins.  This last option comes with a list of potential economic implications for the shipping and manufacturing industry.

For instance, the 70-mile stretch of Mississippi River at St. Louis is one of the busiest inland ports in America—a place where grain, aggregate and steel are loaded and shipped up and down the river.

(via Flickr/ellie)

A south St. Louis alderwoman says she wants her legislation that would require a prescription for the common decongestant pseudoephedrine to start a conversation about combating the methamphetamine problem in Missouri.

Former St. Louis corrections commissioner Gene Stubblefield and his attorney at a 2011 hearing of the city's public safety committee
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 1:00 p.m. with comments from the city.

The former corrections commissioner for the city of St. Louis has sued over his firing, claiming it was racially motivated.

Gene Stubblefield filed the suit today. He was fired Dec. 11, a decision upheld last month by the city's Civil Service Commission, whose members are the plaintiffs.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated with comments for U.S. Attorney Richard Callahan and public safety director Eddie Roth.

The federal government is accusing a building inspector of the city of St. Louis for accepting bribes.

Anthony D. Davis was indicted on Wednesday. It was not made public until his arrest this morning.

The U.S. Attorney's office says Davis accepted more than $2,000 in cash payments in connection with his official duties, which include inspecting buildings and issuing permits. The two bribes allegedly occurred in July and August of last year.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio) / St. Louis Public Radio)

The city's budget committee has put its stamp on next year's $850 million spending plan for St. Louis.

Today, aldermen backed away from a proposal to cut the city's contribution to the pension system for firefighters in an effort to pressure the sides into agreeing on reforms.

Instead, the budget includes language that directs any savings from reforms toward restoring police officers and firefighters.

State transport panel hears from St. Louis metro region

May 14, 2012
(Missouri Dept. of Transportation/via Flickr)

Missouri state and local officials are looking for ways to maintain the state’s transportation infrastructure during a climate of limited funds.

The so-called "Blue Ribbon Citizens Committee on Missouri Transportation Needs" met in Chesterfield and will hold similar meetings around the state this spring and summer. 

MoDOT District Engineer Ed Hassinger says the agency has roughly half the money to spend that it did just several years ago.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A $966 million budget for the city of St. Louis has made it through the first of many hurdles at City Hall.

Mayor Francis Slay, comptroller Darlene Green, and Board of Aldermen president Lewis Reed - who make up the Board of Estimate and Apportionment - all approved the budget on Friday. That sends it to the Board of Aldermen, who can shift money around but cannot add to the overall level of spending.

(via Flickr/Daquella manera)

A new release out from the St. Louis Department of Health today says teen birth rates are down in the city of St. Louis. Here are a few by-the-numbers details for you from the Department:

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 12:20 p.m. with comments from the firefighters union.

Updated at 3:55 p.m. with timeframe, and more comments from Mayor Slay and the union.

Saying the current system is financially unsustainable and could result in huge reductions to city services, Mayor Francis Slay has officially unveiled his plan to change pensions for the St. Louis city firefighters.

(via Flickr/neil conway)

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed suit against the city of St. Louis, asking a judge to make the city turn over jail records related to inmate grievances.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the suit filed Wednesday accuses the city's corrections division of ignoring repeated requests over the past four months for records under the Missouri Sunshine Law.

The suit seeks an injunction forcing release of the records. It also asks the judge to find the city in violation of the law and to impose civil penalties.

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis city and St. Louis County officials say they've gotten federal approval that will help local companies compete in the global market. The area's Foreign Trade Zone has expanded to include all of St. Louis County and City.

The expanded zone will allow more local manufacturing and distribution companies to import goods duty-free and avoid other customs fees.

Mayor Francis Slay announced the expansion at Sunset Transportation in south St. Louis. Slay says the approval from the US Department of Commerce also streamlines the time it takes for businesses to qualify.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

After 18 months of work behind the scenes, a three-week delay, and two hours of debate that covered topics from roller skating to Robert Frost, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen has sent a $64 million bond issue for the city's parks to Mayor Francis Slay.

(Johanna Mayer/St. Louis Public Radio)

Accusations of political gamesmanship are flying today after the introduction of a new St. Louis Board of Aldermen resolution giving about $255,000 to the non-profit animal rescue organization Stray Rescue.

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