City of St. Louis | St. Louis Public Radio

City of St. Louis

St. Louis Treasurer Tishaura Jones diverges from Knowles and Curtis when it comes to how municipal courts affect predominantly black cities.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Treasurer Tishaura Jones is following through with her campaign promises to help reduce the number of St. Louisans without a banking account and increase the number of St. Louis children who go to college.

Through a partnership with national nonprofit Operation Hope and five area banks, the treasurer’s office is hiring a financial counselor to offer St. Louisans free advice on how to improve their credit scores, buy a home and start a business.

Steakpinball | Flickr

Defendants in St. Louis municipal court who face the risk of being arrested because they didn’t pay a fine or fee are getting a second chance.

The city announced Wednesday it is cancelling a total of 56,000 warrants that had been issued to individuals who failed to pay. Those 29,000 people will get a letter offering them a new court date and a chance to explain why they did not pay the initial fines and court costs.

A new initiative aims to increase St. Louis youth's exposure and service at public outdoor spaces, like the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site (pictured), through programs, job opportunities and summer camps.
Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

St. Louis is one of 11 cities participating in a new federal initiative to get more young people to play and, one day, possibly work or volunteer on public lands. 

New Life Evangelistic Center director Larry Rice (center) said the emergency homeless shelter will seek an injunction against a city deadline to reduce its overnight beds.
Stephanie Lecci | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 11:45 p.m. May 28

Rev. Larry Rice, city of St. Louis attorneys and neighborhood stakeholders are continuing with mediation that could allow his homeless shelter downtown to remain open and avoid going to trial this September.

According to a spokeswoman for New Life Evangelistic Center, the parties met for 9 hours on Wednesday in Clayton, but reached no final agreements.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay (center) signs into law the Veterans Preference Bill, giving veterans extra points on applications for city jobs. The bill was sponsored by 22nd Ward Alderman Jeffrey Boyd (right).
Katelyn Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Veterans now will get preference when they apply to work for the City of St. Louis, after Mayor Francis Slay signed the measure into law Monday.

After passing a civil service exam, veterans will be given an additional five points on their applications. Disabled veterans will get another five points on top of that, for a total of 10 points.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis will no longer require job candidates to disclose previous felony convictions on their applications.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay announced the shift in hiring policy during a press conference at City Hall Tuesday.

“We’re really not changing our approach to who we hire. It’s just how we do it,” he said.

The change means potential employees will not have to check a box on their applications if they have a felony conviction.

City Of St. Louis Launches Plan To ‘Jump N2 Shape’

Jun 24, 2014
via Flckr/JeannetteGoodrich

With more than 50 percent of its citizens overweight or obese, the city of St. Louis has set a goal of reducing obesity in the city by 5 percent by 2018. To help meet that goal, the city’s health department has set up an online portal for St. Louisans to get involved.

The online “Jump N2 Shape,” portal gives nutrition and fitness advice and calls for St. Louisans to join the weight loss movement. Once signed up, individuals can log the exercise they complete and the pounds they lose.

The Arch from below
St. Louis Public Radio

Local architect Dan Jay is conducting a thought experiment: What would the city of St. Louis look like if it regained a population of 500,000? (That would mean an increase of 185,000 residents).

After decades of population decline in the city, Jay wants to think big about what a population increase would look like—and what it would take to get there.

s_falkow | Flickr

The Missouri Court of Appeals heard arguments today over whether or not the city of St. Louis' new pension plan for firefighters will hold. Officials say the plan will save St. Louis almost $4 million a year. The union representing the firefighters doesn't dispute the cost savings, but says the city had no right to pass the plan in the first place. 

Downtown Streets Add Old French Names to Street Signs

Feb 16, 2014

Visitors to downtown St. Louis will soon see different names - very old names - identifying downtown streets. Eight streets will receive new street signs featuring the roads' original French names in addition to their current English names.  

The signs were unveiled at a city hall event Saturday marking the 250th anniversary of the founding of St. Louis. 

(via Flickr/functoruser)

Updated at 5:15 Friday with city' plan to turn cameras back on.

Red light cameras in St. Louis City will be turned back on. Friday, a circuit court judge stayed his order from earlier in the week.

In that order, he blocked the city from enforcing its red light camera ordinance, following a lawsuit filed late last year by two women who received tickets for running red lights in St. Louis.

(via Wikimedia Commons/J. Pelkonen)

Check out your neighborhood's crime stats with the interactive map below.

The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department presented their crime statistics to the city's public safety committee today.  And even though the raw numbers show overall crime was down in 2013 compared to 2012, some aldermen say their residents don't care about the numbers if they don't feel safe.

St. Louis Chosen As 'Strong City'

Jan 16, 2014
(Via Flickr/Mandalit)

St. Louis is one of seven cities that the Obama administration chose in the second wave of its Strong Cities, Strong Communities Initiative.

As a result the city will get a full-time federal employee who will work out of Mayor Francis Slay’s office for at least a year.

A team of federal employees and fellows also will provide technical assistance and inter-agency support.

The goal is to push economic development forward in struggling cities.

Officials Urge Caution During Cold Weather

Jan 4, 2014
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated at 5:50 p.m. Monday with information from latest city briefing

As previously reported by St. Louis Public Radio, management of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department officially returned to the purview of the City of St. Louis on Saturday.  After the at times contentious process to regain control, and a 152 year run under state management, the city can now look ahead to the impact local control will have on St. Louis.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 4 p.m. with comments from red light camera opponents.

A memo to those who have gotten caught on camera running red lights in the city of St. Louis - you'll want to pay those fines, or take them to municipal court.

(via Flickr/digitizedchaos)

Updated 2:19 p.m. This live chat was from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. CT on June 10. Thanks for joining us!

This weekend - with the publishing of an opinion piece  in the New York Times entitled "Loving the Midwest," St. Louisans, once again, showed their concern with how the Gateway City is viewed and portrayed on the national level.

Slay Says STL-TV Is Luxury City Can't Afford

May 12, 2013
St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will resume discussions next week of the city’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The budget presented to the board by Mayor Francis Slay totals $985 million.

Among the cuts to the budget that Slay is proposing includes essentially eliminating the city’s cable TV channel, known as STL-TV.

The cut was rejected by the board of estimate and apportionment, but Slay says he remains confident that the Board of Aldermen will see that STL-TV is a luxury the city can’t afford.

(via Flickr/ChrisYunker)

Visitors to Forest Park can expect to see some upgrades over the next five years, thanks to an agreement signed Friday between the city of St. Louis and Forest Park Forever.

(via Flickr/functoruser)

The Missouri Court of Appeals heard oral arguments today in constitutional challenges to three red light camera ordinances in the St. Louis area.

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