City of St. Louis

Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

The city of St. Louis has beefed up the number of attorneys targeting problem properties in the city.

Private lawyers from firms throughout St. Louis, working for free, will supplement the efforts of city attorneys to take the owners of those properties to court.

Those are the buildings that are so structurally unsound they pose a safety risk, or where police get numerous complaints of nuisance crimes.

Asian carp solution will have downstream impact

Sep 17, 2012
Kelly Martin / Via Wikimedia Commons

The issue of keeping Asian carp out of the Great Lakes has implications for a variety of industries.  Midwest officials are weighing a range of options, including severing the connection between the Mississippi River and Great Lakes basins.  This last option comes with a list of potential economic implications for the shipping and manufacturing industry.

For instance, the 70-mile stretch of Mississippi River at St. Louis is one of the busiest inland ports in America—a place where grain, aggregate and steel are loaded and shipped up and down the river.

(via Flickr/ellie)

A south St. Louis alderwoman says she wants her legislation that would require a prescription for the common decongestant pseudoephedrine to start a conversation about combating the methamphetamine problem in Missouri.

Former St. Louis corrections commissioner Gene Stubblefield and his attorney at a 2011 hearing of the city's public safety committee
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 1:00 p.m. with comments from the city.

The former corrections commissioner for the city of St. Louis has sued over his firing, claiming it was racially motivated.

Gene Stubblefield filed the suit today. He was fired Dec. 11, a decision upheld last month by the city's Civil Service Commission, whose members are the plaintiffs.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated with comments for U.S. Attorney Richard Callahan and public safety director Eddie Roth.

The federal government is accusing a building inspector of the city of St. Louis for accepting bribes.

Anthony D. Davis was indicted on Wednesday. It was not made public until his arrest this morning.

The U.S. Attorney's office says Davis accepted more than $2,000 in cash payments in connection with his official duties, which include inspecting buildings and issuing permits. The two bribes allegedly occurred in July and August of last year.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio) / St. Louis Public Radio)

The city's budget committee has put its stamp on next year's $850 million spending plan for St. Louis.

Today, aldermen backed away from a proposal to cut the city's contribution to the pension system for firefighters in an effort to pressure the sides into agreeing on reforms.

Instead, the budget includes language that directs any savings from reforms toward restoring police officers and firefighters.

State transport panel hears from St. Louis metro region

May 14, 2012
Missouri Department of Transportation | Flickr

Missouri state and local officials are looking for ways to maintain the state’s transportation infrastructure during a climate of limited funds.

The so-called "Blue Ribbon Citizens Committee on Missouri Transportation Needs" met in Chesterfield and will hold similar meetings around the state this spring and summer. 

MoDOT District Engineer Ed Hassinger says the agency has roughly half the money to spend that it did just several years ago.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A $966 million budget for the city of St. Louis has made it through the first of many hurdles at City Hall.

Mayor Francis Slay, comptroller Darlene Green, and Board of Aldermen president Lewis Reed - who make up the Board of Estimate and Apportionment - all approved the budget on Friday. That sends it to the Board of Aldermen, who can shift money around but cannot add to the overall level of spending.

(via Flickr/Daquella manera)

A new release out from the St. Louis Department of Health today says teen birth rates are down in the city of St. Louis. Here are a few by-the-numbers details for you from the Department:

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 12:20 p.m. with comments from the firefighters union.

Updated at 3:55 p.m. with timeframe, and more comments from Mayor Slay and the union.

Saying the current system is financially unsustainable and could result in huge reductions to city services, Mayor Francis Slay has officially unveiled his plan to change pensions for the St. Louis city firefighters.

(via Flickr/neil conway)

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed suit against the city of St. Louis, asking a judge to make the city turn over jail records related to inmate grievances.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the suit filed Wednesday accuses the city's corrections division of ignoring repeated requests over the past four months for records under the Missouri Sunshine Law.

The suit seeks an injunction forcing release of the records. It also asks the judge to find the city in violation of the law and to impose civil penalties.

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis city and St. Louis County officials say they've gotten federal approval that will help local companies compete in the global market. The area's Foreign Trade Zone has expanded to include all of St. Louis County and City.

The expanded zone will allow more local manufacturing and distribution companies to import goods duty-free and avoid other customs fees.

Mayor Francis Slay announced the expansion at Sunset Transportation in south St. Louis. Slay says the approval from the US Department of Commerce also streamlines the time it takes for businesses to qualify.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

After 18 months of work behind the scenes, a three-week delay, and two hours of debate that covered topics from roller skating to Robert Frost, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen has sent a $64 million bond issue for the city's parks to Mayor Francis Slay.

(Johanna Mayer/St. Louis Public Radio)

Accusations of political gamesmanship are flying today after the introduction of a new St. Louis Board of Aldermen resolution giving about $255,000 to the non-profit animal rescue organization Stray Rescue.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department)

Four jail breaks in 15 months make the city of St. Louis look like a joke.

That was the general consensus of members of the Public Safety committee  on Wednesday following two hours of testimony on the rash of escapes.

(Screenshot via Google Maps)

Updated with comments from the city, preservationists.

Pedestrian and car traffic will be restricted at Spruce and 11th streets in downtown St. Louis indefinitely because the historic Cupples 7 building  has become structurally unsound.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Good morning! Here are some of today's starting headlines:

Heat wave decreases flood threat on Missouri River

The heat wave that's plagued Missouri for most of July has had a positive side effect:  it's lessened the flood threat along the Missouri River between Kansas City and St. Louis.

Mark Fuchs is a hydrologist with the National Weather Service office in St. Louis.  Fuchs said the extreme high temperatures have dried up the soil along the Missouri River's tributaries.

(via Flickr/Aka Hige)

The city of St. Louis has  confirmed a third heat-related death.

The latest victim is a 79-year-old woman who lived alone in an apartment in the 2900 block of Cass. She had a functioning window AC unit that she used mostly at night, and which was not turned on when officials found her early Wednesday.

The city also reported six heat-related illnesses on Wednesday.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

What Ald. Stephen Conway called a comprehensive animal control strategy for St. Louis is somewhat in limbo tonight after an aldermanic committee passed one bill, rejected a second, and waited to take action on a third.

What passed:

(via Flickr/_J_D_R)

Next Tuesday, St. Louis City voters will vote on Proposition E.  If the proposition passes, the city will retain its 1 percent earnings tax.  If the proposition fails, the tax will be phased out over the next ten years.  Supporters and critics of the earnings tax disagree on many things, including how the tax affects the economic vitality of the city and how prominently the tax figures into people’s decisions to live or work in St. Louis.  But many agree on this: no replacement for the earnings tax is in place and a transition to any combination of alternatives could prove painful.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Francis R. Slay, father to St. Louis Mayor Francis G. Slay has passed away at age 83. He was suffering from a heart illness.

The elder Slay was deeply involved in St. Louis City politics.

He served as a State Representative during the 1960's, was a 23rd Ward Committeeman for 45 years and served as the city's Recorder of Deeds.

Former Aldermanic President Jim Shrewsbury said Slay's reputation was one of integrity and respect.

City of St. Louis to lay off 30 firefighters

Mar 15, 2011
(Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio)

The St. Louis firefighters union lashed out at city hall today after the mayor announced the layoffs of 30 firefighters.

The mayor's office claims that firefighter pension payments are doubling to nearly $11 million in just two years and risk bankrupting city government.

Chris Molitor is the President of Firefighters Local 73.  Among other things, he accused the mayor of refusing to negotiate in good faith.

"When I woke up this morning, I had to see if I was living in Wisconsin or St. Louis, Missouri…this is wrong," Molitor said.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

After some budget restructuring by chief Dan Isom, the St. Louis Police Department will not have to lay off any police officers, the City of St. Louis announced today via a press release from the mayor's office.

Previously, it was reported that the Police Retirement System will saddle increasing costs, with layoffs as a feared consequence if budget restructuring did not happen.

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The St. Louis City Justice Center

Talks between the American Civil Liberties Union and the city of St. Louis on an independent panel to oversee the city's jails have stalled.

The talks were prompted by a 2009 ACLU report that alleged abuse and medical neglect at the city's Medium Security Institution (more commonly known as the city workhouse) and at the higher-security City Justice Center.

Peabody Energy to stay downtown, expand

Mar 2, 2011

St. Louis-based Peabody Energy announced today that it will keep its headquarters in downtown St. Louis for at least another 15 years.

Peabody is a Fortune 500 company employing more than 600 people in St. Louis.

The company had been offered a package of $10 million in Federal New Market tax credits to fund upgrades to their downtown high-rise.

(via Flickr/alkruse24)

The St. Louis Public School District is adopting a more inclusive policy for charter schools.

Historically, the district has accused charters of siphoning away students and resources.

St. Louis Public Schools Superintendent Kelvin Adams says the time has to be more proactive in regard to charters.

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