City of St. Louis

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Non-profits who want to influence political races in the city of St. Louis may soon have to disclose their donors.

A bill that would force those organizations who put more than $500 into a contest for mayor, comptroller, Board of Aldermen president or a ballot issue sailed out of committee today with a 6-0 vote. Five of the 11 committee members were absent, and a quorum wasn't reached until just before the vote.

Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

The city of St. Louis has beefed up the number of attorneys targeting problem properties in the city.

Private lawyers from firms throughout St. Louis, working for free, will supplement the efforts of city attorneys to take the owners of those properties to court.

Those are the buildings that are so structurally unsound they pose a safety risk, or where police get numerous complaints of nuisance crimes.

Kelly Martin / Via Wikimedia Commons

The issue of keeping Asian carp out of the Great Lakes has implications for a variety of industries.  Midwest officials are weighing a range of options, including severing the connection between the Mississippi River and Great Lakes basins.  This last option comes with a list of potential economic implications for the shipping and manufacturing industry.

For instance, the 70-mile stretch of Mississippi River at St. Louis is one of the busiest inland ports in America—a place where grain, aggregate and steel are loaded and shipped up and down the river.

(via Flickr/ellie)

A south St. Louis alderwoman says she wants her legislation that would require a prescription for the common decongestant pseudoephedrine to start a conversation about combating the methamphetamine problem in Missouri.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 1:00 p.m. with comments from the city.

The former corrections commissioner for the city of St. Louis has sued over his firing, claiming it was racially motivated.

Gene Stubblefield filed the suit today. He was fired Dec. 11, a decision upheld last month by the city's Civil Service Commission, whose members are the plaintiffs.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated with comments for U.S. Attorney Richard Callahan and public safety director Eddie Roth.

The federal government is accusing a building inspector of the city of St. Louis for accepting bribes.

Anthony D. Davis was indicted on Wednesday. It was not made public until his arrest this morning.

The U.S. Attorney's office says Davis accepted more than $2,000 in cash payments in connection with his official duties, which include inspecting buildings and issuing permits. The two bribes allegedly occurred in July and August of last year.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio) / St. Louis Public Radio)

The city's budget committee has put its stamp on next year's $850 million spending plan for St. Louis.

Today, aldermen backed away from a proposal to cut the city's contribution to the pension system for firefighters in an effort to pressure the sides into agreeing on reforms.

Instead, the budget includes language that directs any savings from reforms toward restoring police officers and firefighters.

(Missouri Dept. of Transportation/via Flickr)

Missouri state and local officials are looking for ways to maintain the state’s transportation infrastructure during a climate of limited funds.

The so-called "Blue Ribbon Citizens Committee on Missouri Transportation Needs" met in Chesterfield and will hold similar meetings around the state this spring and summer. 

MoDOT District Engineer Ed Hassinger says the agency has roughly half the money to spend that it did just several years ago.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A $966 million budget for the city of St. Louis has made it through the first of many hurdles at City Hall.

Mayor Francis Slay, comptroller Darlene Green, and Board of Aldermen president Lewis Reed - who make up the Board of Estimate and Apportionment - all approved the budget on Friday. That sends it to the Board of Aldermen, who can shift money around but cannot add to the overall level of spending.

(via Flickr/Daquella manera)

A new release out from the St. Louis Department of Health today says teen birth rates are down in the city of St. Louis. Here are a few by-the-numbers details for you from the Department:

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