Cityscape

Sebastian “Tech Supreme” Lee is a cofounder of Delmar Records and a music producer.
Amy Harris/Courtesy of Delmar Records

Delmar Records is working to bring the national spotlight to a group of St. Louis musicians.

Cofounder and music producer Sebastian “Tech Supreme” Lee said the label’s roster features St. Louis musicians with strong careers who are looking expand their audience.  

Provided by the Actors Studio

The St. Louis Theater Circle, a group of local theater critics, released its 2015 award nominees on Friday. 

“It was, I think, a terrific year,” St. Louis Post-Dispatch theater critic Judith Newmark told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday. “It was a year in which we lost one theater — that’s always going to happen. There also are some new people on the horizon. And it was a year in which, I think Shakespeare Festival St. Louis, which is a free event that draws huge crowds, really came into its own with a double production of ‘Henry IV’ and ‘Henry V.’”

A photo from Regina DeLuise's Bhutan exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art in St. Louis.
Regina DeLuise

Photographer Regina DeLuise took a chance and ended up in Bhutan.

“Oftentimes in my life and in my career, I’ll just kind of throw my hat far over the fence somewhere and then go collect it and see what happens,” DeLuise told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter. “It was a very amazing trip. (A) very special place.”

Courtesy of Angel Romero

Even if you haven’t heard classical guitarist Angel Romero play, you’ve heard his influence.

“My guitar goes back so long,” he told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter. “They interviewed George Harrison of The Beatles. They asked him ‘How did you start playing the guitar?’ He said ‘From picking at Angel Romero’s records.’ Jimi Hendrix and all that, they told me that every single night he would put on my recordings before going to bed. My music has crossed over to them as much as theirs has crossed over to me.”

Courtesy of The Big Muddy Dance Company

Ballet may be one of the last things you’d expect to see at a rock venue, but it will happen next weekend.

The Big Muddy Dance Company will perform at The Pageant on Jan. 30 — a first for both.

Sauce executive editor Ligaya Figueras sits with the magazine's 2009 "ones to watch": Cory Shupe, far left, T.J. Vytlacil, Cory King and Adam Alnether.
Jonathan Gayman / Sauce Magazine

Six years ago, Sauce Magazine put together its first “ones to watch” list. At the time, though, Adam Altnether and T.J. Vytlacil were just trying to get started.

“The year before that was kind of this meteoric rise in Niche that everything just kept coming to me,” Altnether told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday. In 2009, Altnether was the chef de cuisine at Niche. Today, he’s a partner at Craft Restaurant Group and Niche’s executive chef.

Kirven, right, and Antonio Douthit-Boyd
Andrew Eccles

Antonio Douthit-Boyd “stumbled upon dance” in St. Louis. Kirven Douthit-Boyd was “forced into it, really” in Boston. The pair, now principal dancers with Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in New York, is moving to St. Louis to become the Center of Creative Arts’ artistic directors of dance.

Michael Lindner
Courtesy of Michael Lindner

For more than 70 years, the National Society of Arts and Letters has sponsored local and national competitions for young artists. This year, the national competition will be in St. Louis.

“(The) organization fosters young people in the arts, bringing them together in their field and providing opportunities for them to compete,” said Peggy Liggett, chairwoman of the competition committee of the St. Louis chapter. “We have some prizes that are very significant.”

St. Louis Low Brass Collective

Low brass is underappreciated. The St. Louis Low Brass Collective wants to change.

“Our goal is to improve the music performance level by offering opportunities for people to play, giving concerts (and) workshops,” B.J. Fullenkamp, a trombonist with Missouri Baptist University and St. Louis Cathedral Brass, told “CityScape” host Steve Potter.

The St. Louis Classical Guitar Society wants to help the Ferguson healing process, one guitar at a time.

Through grants, the Ferguson Guitar Initiative is donating guitars and lessons to fifth- and sixth-grade students in the Normandy and Ferguson-Florissant school districts starting next week.

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