Cityscape

George Caleb Bingham painted 'The Jolly Flatboatmen' in 1846. The oil-on-canvas painting is part of the St. Louis Art Museum's Bingham exhibit.
Courtesy of the St. Louis Art Museum

A new exhibit at the St. Louis Art Museum tackles the personal interests of a Missouri painter known for his depictions of 19th century elections and politics.

“They are the most spectacular paintings he did,” said Melissa Wolfe, the new curator of American art at the museum.

David Choi demonstrates the grill for Steve Potter and Ligaya Figueras on Feb. 3, 2015, at Seoul Q in St. Louis.
Katie Cook / St. Louis Public Radio

It all started in the kitchen of David Choi’s grandma. It was there that Choi fell in love with the flavors of Korean barbecue and the communal act of eating together, and got the idea for Seoul Taco. Choi's Korean-Mexican fusion food truck hit the streets in 2011 and one year later became a brick-and-mortar restaurant off the Delmar Loop.

Daniel Handler
Meredith Heuer

Go ahead; call David Handler’s work weird and bizarre. He’ll thank you.

Handler has written novels for adults as well as two series for children written under the pen name Lemony Snicket. His latest novel, “We Are Pirates,” is for adults, but it’s still quirky.

Marie-Hélène Bernard of St. Louis Symphony
Courtesy of St. Louis Symphony

Marie-Hélène Bernard believes music connects things. People. History. Literature. Sports. And, for Bernard, law.

As a teenager, Bernard played the viola da gamba professionally. Then she became a lawyer, practicing corporate and tax law. But something was missing.

“I realized that music was really a calling, and I could bring skills that the music field needed, both from the business legal standpoint and music and management standpoint,” she told “Cityscape” host Jim Kirchherr on Friday.

Betsy Bowman, left, plays Honey; Michael Amoroso, seated, plays Nick; William Roth plays George and Kari Ely plays Martha in the St. Louis Actors' Studio's 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?'
St. Louis Actors' Studio

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the St. Louis Actors’ Studio presents the twisted reality of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”

“I think it’s the greatest American play of the second half of the 20th century,” director John Contini told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday. “I think it changed the face of theater when it came out.”

Sheldon Art Galleries Director Olivia Lahs-Gonzales takes a photo of Aurelia Hartenberger as she plays a bird ocarina from South America on 'Cityscape' on Feb. 6, 2015.
Katie Cook / St. Louis Public Radio

It started as a garage sale purchase, and grew. Last month, music professor Aurelia Hartenberger and her husband donated 2,500 instruments to the Sheldon Art Galleries.

Jenn Malzone of Middle Class Fashion records at St. Louis Public Radio studios
Willis Ryder Arnold/St. Louis Public Radio

More than 5,000 bands submitted video entries to NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert Contest, including a dozen from the St. Louis area.

Contestants filmed themselves indoors, outdoors, as groups or solo acts, and some even featured tiny desks of their own. Although submissions are closed, "Cityscape" gave listeners an exclusive taste of three local bands participating in the contest. The contest winner will be named Feb. 12.

Middle Class Fashion  

file photo

In honor of "Cityscape" host Steve Potter's 10-year anniversary with the show, production assistant Aaron Doerr put together some of Potter's more memorable (but air-able) bloopers.

Missouri History Museum employees dig through ash and scrap metal for artifacts on Jan. 29, 2015, at the burned-out Fashions R Boutique in Ferguson.
Emanuele Berry / St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri History Museum and Washington University are making sure artifacts from Ferguson are preserved.

Sebastian “Tech Supreme” Lee is a cofounder of Delmar Records and a music producer.
Amy Harris/Courtesy of Delmar Records

Delmar Records is working to bring the national spotlight to a group of St. Louis musicians.

Cofounder and music producer Sebastian “Tech Supreme” Lee said the label’s roster features St. Louis musicians with strong careers who are looking expand their audience.  

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