Civil War in St. Louis | St. Louis Public Radio

Civil War in St. Louis

Men outside of Lynch’s slave pen, 1850s. One of these men might be Lynch himself, but there are no known photos of him.
(Courtesy: Missouri History Museum)

Before the Civil War, Bernard Lynch owned the largest slave market in St. Louis. His operation included an office at 104 Locust Street, and a holding pen for slaves at 5th and Myrtle, present-day Broadway and Clark.

After the war, Lynch’s slave pen became a storage building for the Meyer Brothers Drug company, and in 1963, it was demolished to build Busch Stadium II.

Listener Anne Walker wrote to Curious Louis wondering whether any artifacts from the pen remain.

 

Runners pass the Confederate Monument in Forest Park.
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

On Christmas Eve last year, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay used what is traditionally a quiet period for news to announce that he wanted a 102-year-old monument to Confederate war dead removed from Forest Park.

A year later, the statue remains in place. But city officials say they are committed to fulfilling the mayor's promise.

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

"Why does the Civil War still hold sway over St. Louis and Missouri?”

That was the intriguing — and very large — question that Steve Flick submitted to Curious Louis. “We just can't seem to be able to get beyond the Reconstruction Era in this state,” said Flick, a lifelong St. Louisan.