Clark Terry

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, May 22, 2016 will be “The Keys and Strings Hour + New Music.”  The Quieter Side of Jazz will present John Lewis, a pianist and composer whose style resided at the nexus of jazz and classical music.  We will hear him in settings ranging from the blues (“Pyramid” [“Blues for Junior”]) to Joaquin Rodrigo’s “Concierto de Aranjuez.”  New music will feature a recording of our own Clark Terry and Ernie Wilkins that has a vocal from Dexter Gordon, the Brazilian Trio Da Paz, Florida pianist Lynne Arriale, Philadelphian Duane Eubanks and DE3, Sonny Rollins’ latest

Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis was home to the late, great jazz musician Clark Terry, who died in last year at the age of 94.

Contemporary trumpet virtuoso Byron Stripling was one of the many jazz musicians, from Miles Davis to Quincy Jones, who was influenced by Terry. Stripling, who spent part of his childhood in St. Louis, has returned to the city to pay tribute to Clark Terry at Jazz at the Bistro.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

The Jazz Unlimited show for August 2 is “The Fifty Year Career of Kenny Barron.”  Born in Philadelphia in 1943, pianist Kenny Barron began his career in 1960 and was best known early in his career for his work with Dizzy Gillespie.  Since that time he is now considered to be one of the most important and influential mainstream jazz pianists since the bebop era.  We will hear him with his own groups, Dizzy Gillespie, Clark Terry, Kevin Mahogany, Dave Holland, Benny Carter, Stan Getz, Regina Carter, Sphere, Judy Niemack, a six French horn ensemble, Joshua Breakstone, Ron Carter’s Piccolo Bass

Clark Terry
Clark Terry's website

In April 2006, jazz trumpeter and St. Louis native Clark Terry talked to "Cityscape" host Steve Potter about his upcoming performance at the Greater St. Louis Jazz Festival.

By then, Clark was widely regarded as a legend. He was a star soloist with Count Basie's and Duke Ellington's bands, led his own big band, and was the first black man to play in "The Tonight Show" house band.

Clark Terry
Facebook | with permission

St. Louis jazz trumpeter Clark Terry made his first trumpet. His neighbors quickly got tired of listening to the racket, and raised money to buy the 10-year-old a real instrument.

Terry became a legend: He was a star soloist with the Count Basie Orchestra and Duke Ellington Orchestra; he led his own big band; and he was the first black man to play in “The Tonight Show” house band. Terry died Saturday; he was 94.

Unknown / Unknown

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, March 1 will be “Remembering Clark Terry.”  One of our national treasures, St. Louis trumpeter and jazz educator Clark Terry died February 21 at the age of 94.  We will hear approximately 28 minutes of his voice, telling stories about his life.  The music will include Clark with Count Basie, Oscar Peterson, Benny Carter, Duke Ellington, his own Big B-A-D Band, Thelonious Monk, Coleman Hawkins, the Gerry Mulligan Concert Jazz Band, St. Louisan Chris Woods, Abbey Lincoln, Tubby Hayes, J.J. Johnson and Lee Konitz.

Clark Terry
Facebook | with permission

Legendary jazz trumpeter Clark Terry, who for more than seven decades performed with the audacity of a riverboat gambler to practiced perfection, has died. He was 94.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Please join me on Jazz Unlimited Sunday, February 1 from 9:00 pm to midnight for “Jazz Musicians With Long Performance Careers-Part 1.”  While many jazz fans think that jazz musicians die young, data shows that this is not the case.  The month of February will be devoted to the music of over 200 major jazz artists who have performing careers of fifty years and longer.  Some of the 72 musicians heard on tonight’s show are George Shearing, Clark Terry, Flip Phillips, Illinois Jacquet, Art Farmer, Benny Golson, Lee Konitz, Ahmad Jamal, Charlie Haden, Charles Lloyd, Max Roach, Sonny Rollins, Su

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, November 30 will be “Jazz Giants Born in November and December.”  Jazz Giants are individuals whose sound and approach are instantly identifiable.  Their work has influenced those who came after them.  This show will highlight music from bandleaders Fletcher Henderson, Benny Moten and Toshiko Akiyoshi; pianists Willie “The Lion” Smith, Teddy Wilson, Dave Brubeck, Wynton Kelly, Roger Kellaway, Ray Bryant, Hampton Hawes, and John Hicks; trumpeters Clark Terry, Bunny Berigan and Woody Shaw; saxophonists Serge Chaloff, Phil Woods, Joe Lovano; trombonists Steve Turre a

Photographer Unknown / Courtesy of the Menees family

Jazz Unlimited on Sunday, July 20 will feature “The Jazz History of St. Louis, Part 3: World War II and Its Aftermath."  The period saw the formation of the George Hudson Orchestra and the early careers of Miles Davis, Clark Terry, Jimmy Forrest, Ernie Wilkins, Charles Fox, Chris Woods, Velma Middleton and Arvell Shaw.  Some of the rare recordings include the recording debut of Wendell Marshall, two tunes recorded by Jimmy Forrest at the Bolo Club, a recording by the Tommy Dean Band, a V-disc recording by Clark Terry and His Section Eights, a recording made in St.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for June 1, 2014 will be “The Career of Tommy Flanagan.”  One of the most respected pianists in jazz, Tommy Flanagan was born in 1930 in Detroit.  By the age of 15, he was playing professionally, doing his school homework backstage between sets.  At the urging of his fellow Detroiter, Kenny Burrell, Flanagan moved to New York in 1956.  In that year, he appeared on 13 jazz albums.  In his career, he was heard on 401 recording sessions, recording 50 albums as a leader.  He has five Grammy Nominations to his credit.  Flanagan was Ella Fitzgerald’s accompanist from 1962-1965 and

Clark Terry still played his horn upside down in the late 1980s.
From his autobiography

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - In his 2006 book, “City of Gabriels: The History of Jazz in St. Louis, 1895-1973,” Dennis Owsley explains the title and the theme of his book in the opening sentence of his introduction: “Trumpet players have shaped the sound and the direction of St. Louis jazz from the beginning.”

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, November 3 will present some of the nearly sixty year career of valve trombonist, pianist, composer, arranger and teacher Bob Brookmeyer.  He has played with, arranged and composed for such people as Terry Gibbs, Clark Terry, the Birdland Dream Band, the Gerry Mulligan Quartet and Sextet, Stan Getz, the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra, the Jimmy Giuffre Three, his own New Art Orchestra as well as his own small groups.  The show will include work by such artists as pianists Roger Kellaway and Hank Jones, saxophonists Coleman Hawkins, Al Cohn, Richie Kamuca, Bill Per

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited Sunday evening, September 1 will present “Great Jazz Soloists-Part 4.”   The great soloists highlighted in this program will be violinist Stephane Grappelli, saxophonists Paul Gonsalves, Charles Lloyd, Archie Shepp, Arthur Blythe, Dexter Gordon, James Moody, Sonny Stitt, Branford Marsalis, Ravi Coltrane, Rahsaan Roland Kirk and Anthony Braxton; clarinettist Don Byron, trumpeters Dave Douglas, Terell Stafford, and Clark Terry; pianists Dave Brubeck, Jason Moran, Mulgrew Miller, Brad Mehldau, Fred Hersch, Jacky Terrason and Jessica Williams; vibists Joe Locke and Stefon Harris,