comedy

Improvisers Phoebe Richards and Chris Clark in an improv scene
Larry Vorpmi

When you think of improv comedy, you’re more likely to think of Chicago than St. Louis.

 

Chicago has well known theaters like The Second City and iO, which have given many famous actors and actresses their start. But St. Louis has a theater of its own, and while it may be under the radar, it’s attracting a growing number of students and audiences.

 

The Improv Shop opened its doors in early 2014, but it existed years before that. Its founder, Kevin McKernan, moved back to his hometown of St. Louis in 2009 after studying and performing improv in Chicago.

Rodolfo Martinez\NBC

Seth Meyers joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to discuss his work as a comedian, actor and television host, as well as his appearance Friday at the Peabody Opera House.

Meyers’ performance will include humorous puns on his personal life and political anecdotes about politicians, such as Texas governor Rick Perry.

“The more personalities in the presidential election, the easier and better it is for people like me,” Meyers joked.

Raymond McAnally stars as as Francis Henshall with Jack Fellows as Stanley Stubbers in the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis' "One Man, Two Guvnors."
Jerry Naunheim Jr. / The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

“One Man, Two Guvnors” is part British comedy, part chaos.

“It runs like a mix between rock ’n’ roll show and a bit stand-up comedy and improv because there is so much audience interaction and there are so many wild cards,” said Raymond McAnally, who stars in the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis production.

McAnally plays Francis Henshall, a man who has taken on two jobs for two different bosses, or “guvnors.”

Provided by Katie Borders

Until recently, you may have considered Weird Al Yankovic to be that fading parody singer who turned “Beat It” into “Eat It” before sliding into relative obscurity in the 1990s.

But Weird Al’s not only sustained a 35-year career, he was just showcased at the Emmy Awards. And there’s a grassroots movement to get him on stage at the Superbowl.

Mindy Tucker

Actor, director and comedian Bobcat Goldthwait has quite the eclectic resume. Some may know him for his role on the 1980s animated TV series “Police Academy.” Others may know him for his 1992 film “Shake the Clown” or his 2012 film “God Bless America.”  From 2004 to 2007, he directed more than 300 episodes of “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”

But Goldthwait got his start as a stand-up comedian, and that’s the role that has brought him to St. Louis. He’s in town through Saturday, April 5 to perform his latest set, “You Don’t Look the Same Either” at the Valley Park Funny Bone.

(courtesy Penguin Group)

Updated at 4:00 p.m.

Humorist Dave Barry has been making people laugh for decades. For 20 years, Sunday papers across the country carried his Pulitzer-Prize-winning humor column, syndicated from the Miami Herald.  He’s also the author of a long list of very funny best-selling books.

courtesy photo

Pat Hazell may be best known for his role as a writer for the Seinfeld show but he’s more than a comedic writer. He also is a performer.

Friday, January 24 and Saturday, January 25 he will perform his one man show “The Wonder Bread Years” at Washington University's Edison Theatre. Described as part stand-up, part drama, the show is a tribute to the memorabilia and paraphernalia of the 1960s and 70s.

courtesy photo

Comedian Greg Warren spent his high school years in Kirkwood juggling the roles of student athlete and band nerd, which provided plenty of fodder for his comic routines. He got his start in comedy while a student at the University of Missouri-Columbia and has gone on to perform on Comedy Central, Last Comic Standing and the Bob and Tom radio show.

(Courtesy of Jeff Hirsch)

New Jewish Theatre opens their 17th season with Neil Simon’s The Good Doctor. More of a sketch comedy piece than a true play, the small vignettes of Anton Chekov’s short stories, represent slices of Russian life at the turn of the last century and are quilted together by a narrator, a writer who is auditioning some of his characters for us. David Wassilak plays the narrator and involves himself in several of the stories (either as the narrator character or as a specific character, it’s a bit unclear.)

Jamie Heuer

Today's broadcast of an interview with Mo Rocca is an excerpt from an earlier interview. The initial interview was prempted by President Obama's speech on Syria.

With the new season of Rocca's cooking show starting next week, we took the opportunity to broadcast segments you might have missed earlier and highlight the details of the show.

Related Event

My Grandmother's Ravioli with Mo Rocca

Michael Schwartz

Comedian and frequent Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me panelist Paula Poundstone returns to St. Louis this weekend to perform at the Sheldon Concert Hall on Saturday, February 9th.

Armed with nothing but a stool, a microphone and a can of Diet Pepsi, Poundstone is known for her improvisation and ability to create humor on the spot.

Host Steve Potter talked with Poundstone about her foray into rock climbing, her 16 cats, and more. 

Related Event

Via NPR News, Phyllis Diller has died at the age of 95. The comedian was once a resident of Webster Groves and performed at area comedy clubs. She also has a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame.