community development

The Harambee Youth Training program, which teaches kids tuckpointing skills, received a HUD-funded community development block grant from the St. Louis city's community development administration in 2014.
Courtesy Harambee Youth Training Program

St. Louis highlighted accomplishments this week that it made using millions in federal grant money. These include funding 13 youth programs, developing about 325 new or rehabbed housing units, and hosting other programs for low to moderate income residents last year.

Dragon mural in progress in the Grove
Provided by the artist

Fifteen years ago, the area of St. Louis now known as The Grove was a place many people avoided.

“It was ‘Roll up your window and drive really fast,’” muralist Grace McCammond remembered.

De Andrea Nichols
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio

When you attend an event involving De Andrea Nichols, be prepared to meet your match. Not your romantic soulmate, although that could happen. More likely, your partner in community engagement.

Nichols, 26, is a community arts organizer, designer and social worker who’s the Education and Outreach Coordinator at the Contemporary Art Museum. When she’s not working at CAM, she’s entrenched in one of the many projects of her own nonprofit, Catalysts by Design. Sometimes the twain does meet.

Courtesy FOCUS St. Louis

After 18 years at the helm, Christine Chadwick is stepping down from her role as executive director of FOCUS St. Louis at the end of June. She has led the organization since 1996, when it was formed out of the merging of two nonprofits, Leadership Center of Greater St. Louis and Confluence St. Louis.

Today on St. Louis on the Air she spoke about the mission of FOCUS St. Louis, its role in the region and what she plans to do next.

Next Steps

Over the years, Beyond Housing’s Chris Krehmeyer has appeared on St. Louis on the Air to discuss issues ranging from poverty to home ownership to health and the economy. Most recently, he came to the studio to discuss Beyond Housing’s work with the Normandy School District, a project called the 24:1 Initiative.

St. Louis Public Radio

Local architect Dan Jay is conducting a thought experiment: What would the city of St. Louis look like if it regained a population of 500,000? (That would mean an increase of 185,000 residents).

After decades of population decline in the city, Jay wants to think big about what a population increase would look like—and what it would take to get there.

Courtesy of the Old North Restoration Group

As the population of St. Louis began to shift away from the city’s core in the 1970s, many of the city’s older neighborhoods entered a state of decline. But now, thanks in part to a renewed interest in the city’s older neighborhoods, many are experiencing renewal.

(courtesy of Housing and Urban Development department)

City officials are bullish about a comprehensive data analysis aimed at providing guidance to steer money more strategically for housing and community development programs.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development recently released a "market value analysis" of the city of St. Louis. It’s a snapshot that provides detailed information about foreclosures, housing prices, construction permits and commercial development around the city.

(via Facebook/The Bridge St. Louis)

Original article published Saturday, January 18, 2013

Missourians are more likely to volunteer and to do favors for a neighbor than the average American. But their level of civic engagement depends greatly on their circumstances.

A new report on the state’s civic health, issued by six Missouri universities and the National Conference on Citizenship, found that Missouri largely aligns with the rest of the nation on community involvement.

St. Louis City Hall
Richie Diesterheft | Flickr

When a Board of Aldermen committee made changes to St. Louis' community development block grant recommendations, it showed the city's legislative branch asserting itself against a power shift to the executive.

But not everybody was happy -- including the agency that gave the city the funds in the first place.

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