Concealed Carry

Free gun locks will be given out Friday at City Hall in St. Louis
M Glasgow | Flickr

Updated 3:14 p.m. with reaction -- Gov. Jay Nixon has vetoed a wide-ranging bill that would have eased regulations on people seeking to obtain or renew a conceal-carry endorsement or permit.

Nixon cited one of his main concerns with Senate Bill 656 when he told reporters last week that it could rob county sheriffs of the authority to deny conceal-carry privileges when they see fit. He expanded on that concern in his veto message today.

Brian Munzlinger GOP Sen. 18th NE corner of state
Provided by Mr. Munzlinger's office

A Senate committee is considering a bill (SB 731) to allow students to carry concealed weapons on college campuses in Missouri.

The bill, proposed by state Sen. Brian Munzlinger,  R-Williamstown, drew a strong reaction from both supporters and opponents during a hearing today.

Several local gun stores are reporting an increased demand for tactical weapons and training.
(via Flickr/Foxtongue)

Several St. Louis area gun shops are reporting a spike in sales, and some are attributing it, in part, to preparations ahead of an expected grand jury decision in the Michael Brown case.

About two-thirds of the local gun stores St. Louis Public Radio spoke with report increased sales. Two stores, Marco Polo Outfitters in Chesterfield and Butterfield Gun Works in Ballwin, said they haven't seen a significant jump in sales.

Other stores said it's typical to see more sales at this time of year, thanks to deer season and the start of holiday shopping.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Illinois' very first concealed-carry permits -- about 5,000 of them -- were mailed today, according to the Illinois state police, as reported by the Chicago Tribune.

The Tribune also reported that so far the state has received about 50,000 applications for a concealed-carry permit. It added that about 300 requests have been denied and 800 more are under review because of objections by law enforcement.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has appointed the seven men and women he wants to review objections raised by local or state police to applications for concealed-carry permits.

(via Flickr/Of Small Things)

Gun owners in Illinois who want a concealed-carry permit before April 2014 will have to file a new lawsuit in federal court.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee that spent the summer investigating the Department of Revenue (DOR) is officially accusing the state agency of breaking the law.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

A federal judge is rejecting a legal bid by gun-rights advocates who wanted people to be able to immediately carry firearms in Illinois under the state's new concealed carry law.

East St. Louis U.S. District Judge William Stiehl threw out the lawsuit filed by Mary Shepard and the Illinois State Rifle Association, siding with the state and saying the legal action is moot.

Shepard and the rifle group had argued it was unconstitutional to make people wait for the permit process to be outlined under the new concealed carry law that lawmakers passed July 9.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The final day of hearings into the Department of Revenue's now-defunct policy of scanning and storing documents of driver's license applicants featured the agency's former director answering questions under oath.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee looking into the Department of Revenue's now-defunct policy of scanning documents of driver's license applicants is finally hearing from top officials from Governor Jay Nixon's office.

(Kristi Luther/St. Louis Public Radio)

On Monday, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn paid a visit to the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge in East St. Louis.

Quinn said the bridge will reduce congestion and pollution and praised the jobs the project has created. He also hopes the project nurtures a positive relationship between Missouri and Illinois.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Updated 2:26 p.m. via Illinois Public Radio's Amanda Vinicky. Will be updated further.

Illinois is now a state where concealed carry of weapons is legal. The Illinois Senate voted to override the veto of Gov. Quinn 41-17.

Earlier story:

The Illinois House has rejected Gov. Pat Quinn's changes to legislation allowing the carrying of concealed guns on the deadline for action set by a federal court.

If the Senate approves it later today, Illinois would join the rest of the nation in allowing firearms to be carried in public.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Updated 4;50 p.m. Reporting by Illinois Public Radio's Amanda Vinicky.

With a week to go before a deadline requiring Illinois allow people to carry guns in public, Governor Pat Quinn today vetoed the legislation Tuesday that would have authorized concealed carry. 

(See full veto statement below)

The governor claims he's concerned about public safety, but he's already under fire by critics who say it's a political stunt. The measure's sponsor has already filed paperwork to override Quinn's changes.

About Public Safety?

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

One day after a Missouri House committee issued subpoenas to several members of Governor Jay Nixon's (D) administration, a Cole County judge has issued a preliminary order blocking the subpoenas.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 4:38 p.m.

A Missouri House committee formed to investigate the Department of Revenue’s scanning of driver’s license applicants’ documents has begun two days of hearings into the controversy.

(via Flickr/Of Small Things)

Updated at 11:50 a.m., Friday, June 7 & 3:14 p.m. 

The Illinois State Police on Friday issued a response to Gibbons' letter. The state police, along with the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police and the Illinois Sheriff's Association, say they will continue to enforce state law which prohibits the carrying of "an immediately accessible firearm on your person or in your vehicle regardless of whether it is concealed." Violating the law can result in an arrest.

Our original story:

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Will be updated. Reporting from Chris Slaby.

Both the Illinois House and Senate have approved legislation allowing people to carry guns in public. Illinois, under threat of a court order, is poised to be the last state with such a law. 

The fate of concealed carry in Illinois now rests with Governor Pat Quinn.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Will be updated.

The Illinois House has approved a plan to allow qualified gun owners to carry their weapons in public.

The proposal adopted Friday was brokered by House Speaker Michael Madigan, but it's opposed by several of his fellow Democrats, including the governor.

Gov. Pat Quinn's office has called the plan a "massive overreach" because it would wipe out all local gun regulations, including Chicago's ban on assault-style weapons. That's a deal-breaker for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who backs tough restrictions to curb the city's gun violence.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Legislation is on its way to Governor Jay Nixon (D) that would forbid the Missouri Department of Revenue from scanning and storing source documents of driver's license and non-driver's license applicants.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) is threatening to lay off state workers unless Republican lawmakers fully fund the Missouri Department of Revenue's Motor Vehicles Division for a full fiscal year.

The warning comes one day after House and Senate budget negotiators agreed to only fund the state division for eight months, as a means of pressuring state Revenue officials to stop scanning and storing source documents of driver's license applicants.  Nixon says he'll treat the 8-month appropriation as a full year's funding if GOP leaders don’t reverse themselves.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

House Speaker Tim Jones (R, Eureka) has formed a committee he says will thoroughly investigate the Department of Revenue's scanning of source documents for driver's license and conceal carry applicants, and the release of the state's conceal carry weapons (CCW) holder list to the federal government.

Jones says the committee is necessary because the Nixon administration has not fully cooperated with lawmakers' efforts to get answers to everything that's happened and why.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Jefferson County’s veteran Sheriff Glenn Boyer is among a group of law-enforcement experts tapped by Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones to serve on “an independent, bipartisan investigative committee” to delve into the continued controversy over the state Department of Revenue’s handling of such documents as concealed-carry permits and birth certificates.

At a news conference today in the state Capitol, the speaker said his aim is “to determine the extent of the scandal, find those responsible, and make sure they are held accountable.”

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The federal investigator who requested Missouri’s list of conceal carry weapons holders testified under oath Wednesday before a State Senate committee.

Keith Schilb of the Social Security Administration's Inspector General's office told the Senate Appropriations Committee that part of his job is to seek and develop projects that could indicate whether there is enough evidence of fraud to warrant an investigation.  He says that’s how the inquiry into Missouri’s conceal carry database began.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has passed yet another bill that would expand the rights of gun owners and reduce the role of the state Department of Revenue.

via Flickr/ Foxtongue

The Missouri House has passed yet another bill that expands the rights of gun owners, less than 24 hours after passing legislation aimed at blocking the federal government from enforcing federal gun laws in the Show-Me State.

via Flickr/Foxtongue

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would overhaul the state’s conceal carry process.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri senators trying to target budget cuts at the agency that issues driver's licenses may have instead blocked funding for the registration of boats and mobile homes.

The Senate passed a budget plan late Monday that eliminates the entire $3.5 million allotment for the Motor Vehicle and Driver Licensing Division.

During debate, senators said the proposed cut could halt the issuance of driver's licenses. They described it as negotiating leverage to get additional information from state officials about the data collected from driver's license applicants.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

After nearly eight hours of debate Monday, the Missouri Senate has passed next year’s state budget.

The roughly $25 billion spending plan still does not include Medicaid expansion, but not for a lack of trying by Democrats.  Minority Floor Leader Jolie Justus offered up an amendment that would’ve added $890 million to the Social Services budget, enough to expand Medicaid to around 260,000 Missourians next year.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has passed the so-called Second Amendment Preservation Act, less than 24 hours after it received first-round approval from the same body.

Several local gun stores are reporting an increased demand for tactical weapons and training.
(via Flickr/Foxtongue)

(Updated to include response from Mo. Sen. Kurt Schaefer)

The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms is denying claims that it took part in a joint request for Missouri’s list of conceal carry weapons holders. 

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