craft beer

Cheryl Fields ensures the boiling grain is stirred as it's added
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

As with many industries, the craft beer scene is dominated by men. Yet in the past year women’s craft beer groups have sprung up in St. Louis. This past weekend a group called The OG made the transition from home brewing to commercial brewing.

Brewing tank outside The Schlafly Tap Room in downtown St. Louis.
Wayne Pratt|St. Louis Public Radio

The increasingly competitive craft beer sector has at least two high-profile St. Louis companies looking to make inroads in Chicago, one of the largest markets in North America.

Urban Chestnut and Schlafly recently struck separate distribution deals to start selling in Chicago, which the Brewers Association says is the third largest overall beer market in the country.

Urban Chestnut Brewmaster and co-founder Florian Kuplent, 40.
Willis Ryder Arnold/St. Louis Public Radio

You might think most brewers start making beer because of the taste, and while that’s true, two local brewers were equally charmed by the science behind making beer. Urban Chestnut co-founder and Brewmaster Florian Kuplent said scientific analysis makes a better beer.

“We do a lot of chemical analysis, we analyze the bitterness, we look at yeast cell count, we look at PH (so, acidity of the beer) we look at how much alcohol is in the beer, how much sugar, kind of a portfolio of standard tests we do for every batch,” said Kuplent.

Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

The largest St. Louis Craft Beer Week yet opened Saturday with B33r and Brats at 33 Wine Bar on Lafayette Square.

Kelly Herbst was in line outside the bar at 11 a.m., waiting with about 20 others to try one of the special beers being offered at B33r and Brats. She was looking forward to trying 2nd Shift’s Katy 15.

“They don’t have it everywhere, and it’s a sour beer,” said Herbst. “We like sour beers.”

Véronique LaCapra / St. Louis Public Radio

Forget the stereotypes of beer-swilling men and frat boys. Femme Ferment and The University of Missouri–St. Louis want to introduce women and students to the art of brewing.

Fourth-year PhD chemistry student and homebrewer Joseph Meisel will lead UMSL’s new beer brewing class, Chemistry 1021 Beer Brewing: Chemical and Biochemical Principles.

Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio

Watch how manufacturing beer at Anheuser-Busch's St. Louis brewery (making 15 million barrels a year) looks different from Perennial Artisan Ales's microbrewery in south city.

(Courtesy: Crafting a Nation)

A new feature-length documentary proposes an interesting driver for the economy: craft beer.  Crafting a Nationsaid director Thomas Kolicko, "is about pursuing a dream, with beer as the vehicle that drives it."

Kolicko described crafting beer as an inefficient task, which in turn creates jobs. The film takes the audience to craft breweries in eight different states and thirteen different regions.

(via Flickr/Mooganic)

Let's get the obvious out of the way. Baseball and craft beer are big in St. Louis.

But what about when they're combined at Busch Stadium? A place named after the founding family behind one of the world's biggest mass-produced beer brands? 

A list from The Daily Meal says, "not so much St. Louis."

Urban Chestnut Brewing Company

Urban Chestnut Brewing Company (UCBC) has announced plans to significantly expand its brewing operations in the City of St. Louis.

Ommegang Brewery

Brewery Ommegang in upstate New York is famous for making a kind of dark, malty, Belgian beer, often with high alcohol content.

This style of beer has become increasingly popular among craft-beer makers—including local brands such as Schlafly, Urban Chestnut and Perennial.  

Phil Leinhart is Ommegang’s head brewmaster.  Leinhart is in St. Louis to provide a tasting of specialty beers this Saturday at Urban Chestnut’s second annual Wolpertinger Anniversary festival..

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