Crime | St. Louis Public Radio

Crime

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

A 28-year-old man is in critical condition after an exchange of gunfire with a suburban St. Louis police officer.

Meanwhile, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Friday that the suspect, Carlos Johnson of Ferguson, is charged with first-degree assault on a law enforcement officer. Johnson did not yet have an attorney.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Intelligence gathered after last night’s fatal shooting in North St. Louis has led the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department to believe the incident is tied to several other homicides from the last two weeks.

In hopes of supplementing intelligence efforts and arresting possible suspects, the department has activated the Violent Offense Team.

photo courtesy of UMSL News

St. Louis is back on top, but it's not a list city residents are proud to headline.  For the first time since 2004, St. Louis again tops CQ Press' crime ranking list, earning our fair city the unwanted title of "Most Dangerous."  CQ Press uses publicly available FBI crime data to make its list, but how crime data gets reported and collected across the nation, is a complicated issue.  We tried to break it down a bit on today's St. Louis on the Air.

Commentary: Annie get your camcorder

Jul 8, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 9, 2008 -  It's been more than a year since the local chapter of the ACLU launched "Project Vigilant" in the Fairgrounds Park neighborhood of north St. Louis. This initiative, which issued video cameras to private citizens to record police misconduct, was announced with almost giddy fanfare and garnered widespread press coverage in June 2007.

Commentary: Islands of care in a sea of woe

Jun 11, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 11, 2008 - Two similar but unrelated events in St. Louis recently garnered national headlines. On Friday, May 30, actress Melanie Griffith and drug czar Barry McCaffrey traveled here to address the National Conference of Drug Court Administrators. Their celebrity presence was intended to promote the concept of drug courts as an alternative strategy for dealing with nonviolent narcotics offenders.

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