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I-64 W traffic highway
Paul Sableman | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1rzN9Hd

Since we launched the Curious Louis project last fall, we’ve received plenty of questions/musings/perplexed cries for answers regarding highways, byways and roadways in St. Louis. On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh got answers to some of them by convening a panel of three experts.

Representatives from St. Louis City, St. Louis County and the state (MoDOT) joined the show:

Jacob Norlund / Flickr

The following questions recently came into Curious Louis from someone who wanted to be anonymous: Why do we (St. Louis residents) pay our personal and real estate taxes directly to Gregory F.X. Daly and not a department? How does that compare to other cities?

Daly, the collector of revenue for St. Louis, receives the questions so frequently that his office has set up a webpage to explain.

Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

The question came into Curious Louis from Joellen Pickens: “Why is West Florissant the eastern-most of the other Florissants?”

Pickens is not the first person to wonder about the multitude of Florissants. The St. Louis Star-Tribune tackled it in 1950.

A concerned Curious Louis community member, Dee, asked a great question about accountability:

 

Does Curious Louis need to get more sponsors so you can afford the resources needed to answer more of these questions?

Dee continues, "I really enjoy Curious Louis, but they seem to be struggling to keep up with the inquiries."

More resources? Who wouldn't turn down more resources? While more sustaining members to support our work is wonderful (donate here), sometimes our newsroom is just short on time.

 

 

Here's what we can do to keep you informed about the Curious Louis reporting process and what you can do to help it work better.

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

"Why does the Civil War still hold sway over St. Louis and Missouri?”

That was the intriguing — and very large — question that Steve Flick submitted to Curious Louis. “We just can't seem to be able to get beyond the Reconstruction Era in this state,” said Flick, a lifelong St. Louisan.

voting booth for paper ballot
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

St. Louis Public Radio's Curious Louis was recently asked about the Village of Country Life Acres. The 2010 census lists the tiny west St. Louis County village as having 74 residents. Yet, it had 92 registered voters at the end of that year.

Steve Patterson

Kyle Reynolds drives by St. Louis’ last surviving mound, Sugar Loaf Mound, located at 4420 Ohio in south St. Louis, all the time yet he didn’t know about its existence until he read about it online. Still baffled by its significance, he turneed to St.

Horizontal photo of a cracked and fading yellow road stripe in St. Louis.
Joseph Leahy | St. Louis Public Radio

Driving in the metro area can be difficult when motorists have trouble seeing the lines on the road, especially at night when it’s raining. The issue prompted scores of respondents to our Curious Louis project to wonder why more reflective paint isn't used on local streets. We looked into their concerns and found it’s mostly a matter of rough winters and tight budgets.

Briana O'Higgins | KCUR 89.3 / KCUR 89.3

You'd be amazed at how often St. Louisans' curiosities are piqued as we explore St. Louis and meet the people in our community. Or maybe you wouldn't be. We bet you're just as curious as we are. Just as curious as your neighbors who've submitted and answered questions to our Curious Louis project.

Public radio station KCUR in Kansas City recently looked into something that we thought made an excellent Curious Louis question. So, here it is: an answer to the question, "Why are there so many Canada geese in Missouri?" What makes these birds stick around instead of migrate further north?

Emma Clemenson on the right in the late 1990s with four cousins, all in their Christmas kimonas, singing "Sisters" from the movie "White Christmas." Singing along with the movie has been a family tradition for six decades.
Courtesy Mary Burke

For Mary Burke of Kirkwood, watching  the 1954 movie “White Christmas” is like Santa Claus and candy canes — a holiday tradition. Burke and her three sisters grew up in the 50s and 60s singing and dancing along with Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney. It’s something they never outgrew.

Penrose Park Velodrome

If you drive from the airport toward downtown on I-70, you’ve probably missed a little-known bicyclists’ haven which sits just beyond your field of vision off of the highway at its intersection at Kingshighway Blvd: The Penrose Park Velodrome. It is one of 27 of its kind in the entire United States.

Curious Louis Holiday Movies illustration
Susannah Lohr

For Amber Hinsley of St. Charles, nothing says “Christmas” like huddling in the dark with dozens of strangers. In a movie theater, of course.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Have you ever wondered why that ‘Maplewood’ sign on Manchester is backwards? Rick Jackoway did—and he asked the question of St. Louis Public Radio’s newest project: “Curious Louis.” What happened next? Storytelling magic.

On Tuesday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” St. Louis Public Radio’s Engagement Producer Kimberly Springer and Arts and Culture Reporter Nancy Fowler joined host Don Marsh to discuss “Curious Louis” and what they found when they investigated the Maplewood sign in question.

The backwards Maplewood installation by Brooklyn artist Janet Zweig is illuminated at night. "I fell in love with the city," Zweig said.
Cathy Carver

Rick Jackoway recently moved back to St. Louis after 26 years away. When he drove under a sign on the MetroLink overpass on Manchester Road he thought, “Well, you don’t see that every day!”

So he asked our new Curious Louis project:

Why is the word Maplewood spelled backward on the sign going over Manchester Road, just east of Laclede St. Road? Always wondered.

Curious Louis has a question for you

Nov 1, 2015

What have you always wondered about in and around St. Louis? 

People? Landmarks?

Customs? Habits?

Political issues?

We're launching a new project that we think you're going to like: Curious Louis.

Who's Curious Louis? Curious Louis is YOU.

One of the best aspects of the web, and social media, is that they've completely changed how we get to relate to you and the issues you care about.

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