deer

Some residents of Town and Country are protesting the city's approach to deer overpopulation in the suburb.
Alvin Trusty, via Flickr

Some residents of Town and Country plan to hold a vigil for deer Thursday night in an unusual protest against what they call the city's costly and ineffective approach to managing the animal population. 

According to the Missouri Department of Conservation, deer populations will offer plenty of hunting opportunities this year, as numbers are recovering from disease outbreaks across the state.
Noppadol Paothong, Missouri Department of Conservation

It's good news for hunters, but maybe bad news for drivers: the Missouri Department of Conservation says the state will see a pretty good deer population this year.

Many parts of the state should see a "large and healthy deer herd" this season, after years of declining populations, according to the department's Jim Low. He estimates the state has more than a million deer, offering "plenty of deer hunting opportunity out there."

Recovery from disease

Ian Sane | Flickr

The Missouri General Assembly gets a second bite at the apple as it considers whether to override Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of a bill that would have transferred oversight authority of the deer-farming industry from the Department of Conservation to the Department of Agriculture. Despite a sustained scaremongering campaign by opponents of this bill, the legislation is worth passing.

Ian Sane | Flickr

The bad news is that chronic wasting disease, or CWD, has reached epidemic proportions among deer in some parts of the United States.

The good news is that the Missouri Department of Conservation has so far been successful in containing the spread of CWD after finding cases of the disease at a captive deer breeding operation in 2010.

Ian Sane | Flickr

The number of deer in Missouri harvested by hunters using firearms this November is down, compared to a year ago, and last year's drought and heat wave may have played a key role.

Jim Low with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) says the extreme heat and drought last summer caused a drop in the deer population in northern and central Missouri.

(via Flickr/Robert Scoble)

Conservation officials in Missouri want deer hunters to take precautions this fall in order to prevent the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease.

CWD cases are so far limited to a containment zone in north central Missouri, with the state's first documented case occurring three years ago.  Joe Jerek with the Missouri Department of Conservation says hunters should wear latex gloves when field-dressing a deer.

A Missouri House interim committee heard testimony Monday on whether Chronic Wasting Disease, or CWD, poses a grave threat to the state's white tail deer and elk populations.

(via Illinois Department of Natural Resources)

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources says drought is fueling an outbreak of a fatal deer disease in southern and central Illinois and surrounding states.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Mo. Senators pushing legislation to make information available about grants and budget cuts

The legislation would require details about federal grants worth at least $1 million to be posted on the Missouri Accountability Portal, which is an online tool for tracking state expenses.  It also would require the governor to post a daily report on that website listing how much money he has withheld from state agencies and programs to help balance the budget.

(via Flickr/Ian Sane)

Here's a strange, and painful-sounding, story out of Ellisville this morning for you:

A 53-year-old St. Louis County woman is hospitalized with critical injuries after being struck in the head by a deer.

Authorities say the woman was standing in a service station parking lot in Ellisville when two deer ran through the lot. One of them ran into the woman, knocking her to the ground. The animal then bounded into an insurance company window.

The woman is hospitalized in critical but stable condition. Her name has not been released.

(via Missouri Department of Conservation/Amy Nold)

Some Missouri deer hunters made unexpected discoveries while hunting this fall. Five female deer have been reported by hunters to the Missouri Department of Conservation sporting fully formed antlers. The antlered deer, analyzed by MDC Resource Scientist Emily Flinn, appear to be externally female. Flinn specializes in deer biology and says this phenomenon all comes down to hormones.

(via Flickr/Robert Scoble)

Illinois hunters harvested more than 66,500 deer during the state's opening firearm season.

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources says the preliminary total includes deer harvest from Friday through Sunday.

It is about 1,500 fewer deer than were taken during the first weekend harvest in 2010. Pike County had the most deer taken with 1,917. Adams County came in second, followed in order by Fulton, JoDaviess and Jefferson counties.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Cardinals win Game 3 of NLCS

Albert Pujols hit an RBI double during a four-run first inning and the St. Louis bullpen bailed out ChrisCarpenter as the Cardinals beat the Milwaukee Brewers 4-3 last night for a 2-1 edge in the NL championship series.

In a matchup of aces, neither Carpenter nor 17-game Yovani Gallardo made it past the fifth. The one-run lead Carpenter handed over was just enough, as four relievers combined for four perfect innings.

(via Flickr/Robert Scoble)

Officials in two suburbs of St. Louis have approved policies to control the deer populations.

Aldermen in the St. Louis County community of Town and Country voted 7-1 Monday for a six-month sharpshooting program. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the contract will go to White Buffalo Inc., the deer management firm that performed euthanasia and sterilization under previous city contracts.

(via Flickr/orcmid)

State officials are warning drivers in Missouri to beware of deer crossing roadways.

They are more active in the fall, which is their mating season.  Fall harvests and hunting also contribute to deer being more mobile this time of year.

Data collected by the insurance company State Farm for its 2010-2011 survey period ranks Missouri 19th in the nation for most deer strikes – down from 17th the prior year.  Missouri State Highway Patrol Captain Tim Hull says the metro areas of St. Louis and Kansas City have the most deer strikes.