Delmar Boulevard

(via Flickr/Eric Fischer)

The “Delmar Divide” refers to Delmar Boulevard in St. Louis.  It is a street which runs east/west and to a large extent separates the racial make-up of the city.  In a sample of households north and south of Delmar, residents south of Delmar Boulevard are 73% white, while residents north of Delmar are 98% African American, as the BBC pointed out in, “Crossing a St. Louis street that divides communities,” last year.

(photo courtesy of MoDOT)

The Missouri Department of Transportation will close all lanes of Interstate 170 at Delmar next Friday, July 8, to set girders and install portions of the driving surface for the new bridge.

Lane closures will start around 7 p.m. on July 8, and all lanes will be open again by the morning rush hour on Monday, July 11.

(Missouri Department of Transportation)

Interstate 170 near the Delmar Blvd. bridge will close at 7 p.m. Friday, May 20 so crews with Millstone Bangert can remove the aging structure and begin construction on its replacement.

(via Flickr/ Beaufort Thedigitel)

Despite the onslaught of rain and thunderstorms, the Missouri Department of Transportation says it will move ahead with planned road closures over the weekend.

Several interstate lanes and ramps will be closed while dozens of repairs to the roadways are made.

Deanna Venker, with MoDOT, says the numerous closures might seem like they’d cause a huge headache, but they will actually reduce the impact on drivers.

“We’re trying to incorporate as much work as we can in to these closures when we have to do them,” Venker said.

(Missouri Department of Transportation)

The Delmar Blvd. bridge over Interstate 170 will be closed until it is replaced, the Missouri Department of Transportation announced today.

The department had closed the bridge yesterday to do some emergency repairs. A bridge inspection team, however, determined that the bridge would remain unsafe even with the repairs.

(via Flickr/Eric Fischer)

Jack Straughter was a pipefitter in the 1960s when he and his wife were looking for a new house for their family of seven, and so he could have afforded to live almost anywhere in the city of St. Louis.  But as a black man, there were places he never considered looking.