Delmar Divide

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Our world is never free of conflict. There are many “we” versus “they” imbroglios in which an exalted group lets pride lead to disdain, second-class status, or even violence against those outside the group. The lines of demarcation include race, ethnicity, religion or nationhood.

photo of Damon Davis
Jo Vonda Winters

A project designed as a bridge across Delmar Boulevard begins construction this week and should be in place in early February. It's a contemporary concept with a low-tech twist: hand-delivered letters.

The “Wailing Wall,” envisioned by local musician and artist Damon Davis, was chosen last August from among other entries in a contest of ideas to address what’s known as the Delmar Divide. The term refers to income inequality north and south of Delmar Boulevard.

(via Flickr/Eric Fischer)

The “Delmar Divide” refers to Delmar Boulevard in St. Louis.  It is a street which runs east/west and to a large extent separates the racial make-up of the city.  In a sample of households north and south of Delmar, residents south of Delmar Boulevard are 73% white, while residents north of Delmar are 98% African American, as the BBC pointed out in, “Crossing a St. Louis street that divides communities,” last year.