dementia

St. Louis on the Air
2:03 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Finding Balance And Dignity Among The Chaos Of Dementia

PET scan of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease
US National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center

Dementia is the broad term which refers to diseases which result in a significant loss of cognitive ability.

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the worst manifestations of dementia.

A symposium at Washington University in St. Louis this week aims to be a gathering place for people struggling to find balance and dignity among the chaos of dementia.

Read more
Alzheimer's Disease
5:35 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

Study To Test Drugs Aimed At Preventing Alzheimer’s Dementia

The areas where the most Alzheimer’s plaques typically form are highlighted in red and yellow on these brain scans.
Tammie Benzinger, MD, PhD, Tyler Blazey/Washington University

Washington University will soon lead a clinical trial aimed at preventing people with Alzheimer’s disease from developing dementia.

The international trial will involve 160 patients in the U.S., Europe, and Australia who have a very rare, inherited form of Alzheimer’s, which typically causes dementia before age 50.

Washington University neurologist and study lead Dr. Randall Bateman says this is one of the first clinical trials to try to treat Alzheimer’s patients before they have any symptoms.

Read more
Alzheimer's Disease
5:30 am
Mon September 26, 2011

Changes in marker for Alzheimer's linked to sleep cycle

Micrograph of amyloid beta plaques in the brain, as may be seen in Alzheimer disease.
(Via Wikimedia Commons user Nephron)

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have shown a relationship between daily sleep patterns and a protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

The researchers found that levels of the beta amyloid protein in spinal fluid increased during waking hours and decreased during sleep.

Wash U neurologist Randall Bateman says that pattern was strongest in young, healthy test subjects. It lessened in people over sixty, and disappeared altogether in Alzheimer’s patients.

Read more