Developmental Disabilities | St. Louis Public Radio

Developmental Disabilities

Priscilla Miller, who has been coming to Artists First for about a year, colors in one of her drawings.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

When it comes to supporting people with developmental disabilities through art-making, the activities are much more than just a pastime.

For some in St. Louis, being creative helps them buy food, or get a job. Those are goals – and outcomes – of a St. Louis-area organization called Artists First. But budget cuts are jeopardizing the nonprofit, forcing some hard decisions.

Worker at one of Community Link's workshops for adults with developmental disabilities.
courtesy Community Link

Social service agencies that provide support to thousands of people in the Metro East will be operating without state funding starting Wednesday if Illinois lawmakers and Gov. Bruce Rauner can’t reach a budget compromise before the start of the new fiscal year.

Funding for most state programs, including child care subsidies and early intervention for children with developmental disabilities, have yet to be approved.

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

The expert Easter egg fillers at Canterbury Enterprises in Shrewsbury packed 5.5 million plastic eggs with candy and toys this year — a new record for the nonprofit sheltered workshop that employs about 100 people with disabilities.

Adrian Clark | Flickr

The state of Missouri may be required to repay $11.5 million to the federal government, after miscalculating Medicaid payment rates for some case management services to people with developmental disabilities. The findings  were published last week in an audit by the Office of the Inspector General. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 26, 2008 - The movie Tropic Thunder debuted in August with attendance that matched the accolades from the critics. It was feted as humor at it finest - a satire that pulled no punches.

About 13 years ago, I might have found Tropic Thunder humorous. Then, my son was born with autism. Now, it's not so funny. The movie's repeated use of the term "retard" and its depiction of those with developmental disabilities are unquestionably demeaning. But the real joke is the defense of its satiric ambitions that fall once again on that great pillar of Hollywood absolution - creativity.