Dinah Tatman | St. Louis Public Radio

Dinah Tatman

The Rev. Dinah Tatman and faith leaders speak in support of the economic boycott on Nov. 2, 2017.
Chelsea Hoye | St. Louis Public Radio

As protests over the Jason Stockley verdict continue in St. Louis, the persistent chant of “no justice, no profits ” can be heard. Now, that credo is being put into action.

Community activists are using the upcoming holiday season as an opportunity to launch an economic boycott campaign from “any entities that do not respect us or our purchasing power” said the Rev. Dinah Tatman, CEO and founder of Greater New Vision Ministries Inc. in St. Louis.

Protesting youth were stranded on the street after curfew when Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency and imposed a midnight-to-5 a.m. curfew in Ferguson in August 2014.
File photo | Lawrence Bryant | St. Louis American

The 2014 death of Michael Brown, a black, unarmed 18-year-old, at the hands of a white police officer unleashed anger and activism throughout the St. Louis area.

Some who marched in the streets of Ferguson after August 9 of that year remain committed to changing hearts, minds and laws throughout St. Louis and Missouri, despite setbacks at the ballot box and within legislative chambers. But activists also concede that policy alone won't bring St. Louis together: It'll require people of all stripes acknowledging the realities of a racially divided region and state.