DNA

Medical Ethics - Genetics
2:17 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Whole Genome Sequencing Is Here To Stay. What Does That Mean For Genetic Privacy?

Adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine (abbreviated ATCG) are the four nucleotide bases that make up DNA.
Credit Jane Ades, NHGRI

Originally published on Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Updated to include audio from St. Louis on the Air.

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St. Louis on the Air
6:46 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Legal Roundtable: Affirmative Action, School Transfer, Phone Data Collection, Etc.

Scales of Justice
(via Flickr/James Cridland)

The top legal issue in the day’s news was the U.S.

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Science
9:53 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Natural DNA Cannot Be Patented, Supreme Court Rules

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 10:28 am

In a decision that could have broad-reaching effects on the future of science and medicine, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that:

-- "A naturally occurring DNA segment is a product of nature and not patent eligible merely because it has been isolated."

-- But, synthetically created "strands of nucleotides known as composite DNA (cDNA)" are "patent eligible" because they do not occur naturally.

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Research News
2:37 am
Thu January 24, 2013

Shall I Encode Thee In DNA? Sonnets Stored On Double Helix

William Shakespeare, depicted in this 17th century painting, penned his sonnets on parchment. Now his words have found a new home ... in twisting strands of DNA.
Attributed to John Taylor National Portrait Gallery

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 12:19 pm

English critic Samuel Johnson once said of William Shakespeare "that his drama is the mirror of life." Now the Bard's words have been translated into life's most basic language. British scientists have stored all 154 of Shakespeare's sonnets on tiny stretches of DNA.

It all started with two men in a pub. Ewan Birney and Nick Goldman, both scientists from the European Bioinformatics Institute, were drinking beer and discussing a problem.

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Genetics - Cancer
6:43 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Unwinding the helix: using genetics to treat childhood cancer

Washington University’s Todd Druley uses a magnet to separate DNA-coated magnetic beads from a liquid reaction buffer, to isolate specific genes from patient DNA for sequencing analysis.
Scott Supplesa

Pediatric leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. There are about 3,000 new cases in the United States every year, typically in children between the ages of four and six.

With treatment, about three-quarters of affected children are able to beat the disease.

But for those with what’s known as “high risk” leukemia, the odds of survival are much worse.

Washington University pediatric oncologist Dr. Todd Druley has been trying to use genetics to understand why some leukemia is so hard to treat. He spoke with St. Louis Public Radio's Véronique LaCapra.

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Morning round-up
9:26 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Morning headlines: Monday, March 26, 2012

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers breached the levee at Birds Point as part of the activation of the floodway May 2, 2011.
Flickr/USACEpublicaffairs

Corps plans to hire private companies to restore Birds Point

The corps set off explosions at three spots on the levee last May to relieve pressure on the floodwall in Cairo, Ill.  

The Southeast Missourian reports the corps will be looking in the next two weeks for three firms to bid on the projects.

The corps halted its floodway repairs in December after spending $20 million to shore up the levee to 55 feet of flood protection at each of the blasting spots.

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Morning round-up
9:40 am
Mon November 14, 2011

Morning headlines: Monday, November 14, 2011

Cancer study shows limiting alcohol reduces chances of developing breast cancer

A new study today finds that young women with a family history of breast disease can reduce their risk of developing breast cancer by avoiding alcohol. The research, published in the journal "Cancer", looked at more than nine-thousand young women starting in 1996 and tracked them through 2007.

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DNA Evidence
12:01 pm
Mon September 26, 2011

Innocence Project: DNA shows wrongful conviction in 1982 killing of St. Louis woman

George Allen.
Provided by Mo. Dept. of Corrections

Updated 2:37 p.m. with St. Louis Public Radio story.

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Morning round-up
8:48 am
Fri May 20, 2011

Morning headlines: Friday, May 20, 2011

Legislation headed to Gov. Nixon would reduce the potential penalties for initial violation of misdemeanors.
Flickr/david_shane

Legislation Reducing Penalties for Initial Misdemeanors Headed to Nixon

Legislation headed to Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon would reduce the potential penalties for initial violations of misdemeanors such as driving without a valid license, failing to maintain vehicle liability insurance and being a minor in possession of alcohol. Instead of the possibility of jail time, the legislation only would allow fines up to $300.

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Genetics
12:33 pm
Wed January 26, 2011

Researchers sequence genome of endangered orangutans

In the Malay language, oran-utan means "man of the forest." (Perry van Duijnhoven/Carel van Schaik)

An international team of researchers has sequenced the genomes of two species of orangutan.

Lead researcher Devin Locke of the Genome Center at Washington University said a primary motivation for studying the genes of orangutans is their close evolutionary relationship to humans.

“The lessons you learn from studying these species can be applied to understanding of our own evolution and the evolution of the human population as well,” Locke said.

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