dog breeding

via Flickr/david_shane

An attorney for nonprofit animal shelters is trying to persuade the Missouri Supreme Court to strike down a law that he says was originally enacted through "legislative shenanigans."

Attorney David Cosgrove argued Tuesday to the Supreme Court that lawmakers violated the state constitution by including the animal shelter fee in a 2010 bill that originally dealt with dynamite.

(via Friends of Shane Schoeller)

Agricultural interests are being highlighted in the Missouri Secretary of State’s race this week.

Republican nominee Shane Schoeller is conducting a “Farm Values Tour” across the state, in which he’s reviving memories of the recent battle over dog breeding regulations.  He says his Democratic opponent, Jason Kander, would follow in Robin Carnahan’s footsteps in writing ballot summaries that could greatly harm farmers who also breed dogs.

(Photo by: Hamed Saber, Flickr Creative Commons)

The Missouri Department of Agriculture has finalized the first set of new rules for dog breeders in Missouri, which go into effect January first.

They're the result of a compromise reached earlier this year between Governor Jay Nixon (D) and Republican lawmakers.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 6:38 p.m.:

Missouri lawmakers have sent Gov. Jay Nixon a new version of a bill rewriting a voter-approved law on dog-breeding.

Wednesday's quick action by the state House and Senate came after Nixon began the day by signing a previously passed bill repealing key sections of the "Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Act" approved by voters last November.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation repealing part of a voter-approved dog-breeding law in an agreement with lawmakers to consider more changes to breeder regulations.

Nixon signed the legislation Wednesday. It eliminates a cap on owning 50 breeding dogs and rolls back various requirements on dogs' living conditions. Instead, breeders would need to provide appropriate space for dogs based on regulations set by the Department of Agriculture. Operators would pay more for licenses and help finance a program that crack down on unlicensed breeders.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Update: A 2 p.m. scheduled press conference with Gov. Nixon on this topic was canceled without explanation to the press.

Updated at 3:46 p.m. April 20, 2011:

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says officials are making progress toward completing an agreement on a dog-breeding law to make revisions embraced by the governor.

The Legislature earlier passed legislation to rewrite a dog-breeding law that voters approved last year. Nixon didn't say Wednesday if he'll sign or veto that legislation.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Missouri lawmakers have given final approval to legislation replacing many provisions in a dog-breeding law approved by voters in November.

The House approved the legislation 85-71 on Wednesday. It cleared the Senate last month and goes now to Gov. Jay Nixon.

The bill eliminates a cap on owning 50 breeding dogs and rolls back various new requirements on dogs' living conditions. Instead, breeders would need to provide appropriate space for their animals based on regulations set by the Department of Agriculture.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)
  • Two U.S. marshals and one St. Louis police officer were shot while attempting to make an arrest in the 3100 block of Osage in south St. Louis City. St. Louis police have confirmed that the suspect has died following a stand-off that began shortly before 7 a.m. The 2 marshals were taken to St. Louis University hospital where one is in critical condition and one is in fair condition, according to a hospital spokesperson. The St. Louis police officer was hit in the vest and suffered a graze wound.
(Photo by: Hamed Saber, Flickr Creative Commons)

Missouri voters passed a ballot measure in November for tougher rules on dog breeders. Now the Missouri legislature is attempting to overturn the vote.

Check out the story from our own Adam Allington featured on Marketplace this morning.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

A series of public hearings began today for legislation that would repeal, amend, and place exemptions on Proposition B.

Missouri voters narrowly approved the measure in November.

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