domestic violence

A silent witness display created by the Violence Prevention Center, to represent victims murdered in counties they serve. The shields on the chests tell who the victim was and their story, provided by family members.
provided by the Violence Prevention Center of Southwestern Illinois

Domestic violence shelters in Illinois have spent the past months dipping into savings and cutting back staff. At least one has closed its doors to women and children. With the legislature unlikely to pass a budget anytime soon, service providers are looking to an uncertain future.  

“We’re running on a very skeleton crew,” said Debbie Sander, the executive director of Phoenix Crisis Center in Granite City. “We’ve not replaced staff members, due to the uncertainty of the finances.”

Brian Rohlfing is co-founder of Watchdog Creative, the company behind the Stop Harassing Me Now app.
Watchdog Creative | provided

A new anti-bullying app available on Google Play is the brain child of a handful of St. Louis dads. The Stop Harassing Me Now app, which is also designed to combat domestic violence, records flagged calls and texts and stores them in a secure database in case they are needed as evidence.

Courtesy of Raven

Joe Eulberg  doesn't remember what made him so upset that he flipped a table during an argument with his wife 20 years ago.

He does remember the outcome.

"A few days after that, Barbara, my wife, came and said you need to get help or I'm going to leave and take the kids,” Eulberg said in a recent interview with St. Louis Public Radio.

Eulberg turned for help to the Raven.

(via Flickr/s_falkow)

Updated at 4:35 p.m. with comment from Governor Jay Nixon.

A alliance of legal and political figures has launched an effort to get clemency for 14 women incarcerated in Missouri. 

The women are in prison for violent crimes, including murder. But coalition members said many were battered women who killed their abusers and others did not directly harm anyone by committing their crimes. All were victims of abuse starting at a young age and some had addiction problems.

Anna Saphphire via Flickr

There’s no “typical” abuser. There’s no “typical” victim. Domestic violence and sexual abuse happen everywhere.

“It doesn’t matter what you drive, what you do for a living, how many kids you have, what neighborhood you live in, we receive calls from every single ZIP code in the entire St. Louis metropolitan area,” said Susan Kidder, executive director of Safe Connections. “Abuse is happening no matter where one lives.”

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Isaac heads to St. Louis

Drought-stricken Missouri is preparing for what has been an unusual occurrence this summer - a couple of rainy days. Forecasters expect remnants of tropical storm Isaac to reach Missouri on Friday, with rain spreading over southern, central and eastern portions.

The National Weather Service says the St. Louis region could get 3 to 5 inches. Soaking rains are expected to help alleviate Missouri's drought but not break it. More than 97 percent of the state is now listed in the two most severe categories of drought.

(via Wikimedia Commons/ United States Department of State)

Wagner Enters U.S. House Race

Former Missouri Republican Party Chairwoman Ann Wagner has announced her candidacy for a U.S. House race.  Congressman Todd Akin announced Tuesday that he will forgo re-election for his suburban St. Louis seat to instead enter the Republican primary to challenge Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. Hours later, Wagner announced that she will run for Akin's 2nd District seat.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Legislation overhauling Missouri's domestic violence laws for the first time since the 1970s has won unanimous approval in the state Senate.

Thursday's vote was 33-0. The bill now goes to the House.

Among other things, the wide-ranging measure would require that state prosecutors rather than local authorities handle cases involving repeat domestic violence offenders.

It would also exempt victims from paying filing fees when they ask a court to enforce a protection order.

  • The state of Missouri has carried out its first execution in nearly two years. Early this morning, 47-year-old Martin Link was put to death for the 1991 kidnapping, rape and murder of 11-year-old Elissa Self-Braun. Missouri Department of Corrections spokesman Chris Cline says Link died by lethal injection shortly after midnight at the state prison in Bonne Terre. On Monday, Gov.
(Rachel Lippmann, St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster has unveiled the legislative changes he says will strengthen the state's domestic violence laws.

The 12 recommendations are the result of a task force Koster convened last year, and seven of them will require action by the General Assembly.

Most of the legislative proposals focus on strengthening orders of protection, which Koster calls the main tools to help domestic violence victims. He says current law doesn't allow juveniles to request those orders.