Will a new regulation regarding commercial drone flight change how many drones we see in the skies around us?
Joseph Leahy | St. Louis Public Radio

Monday, Aug. 29, marked the first day that new rules went into effect regulating commercial drone operations in the United States. Could this change in rules impact the number of drones we see flying the friendly skies (and in our neighborhoods)?

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard from two people close to the matter — a professor who teaches drone techniques to journalists and a St. Louisan whose business relies on the ability to fly drones commercially. Their names are Matt Waite, professor at the College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and Ravi Sahu, CEO of AirZaar and organizer of St. Louis’ area commercial drone meetup, which has 190+ members.

Musem-goers view  Andrea Stanislav's "Convergence Infinité" at the St. Louis Art Museum
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Have you ever wondered what St. Louis looks from the perspective of a hawk or eagle?

The St. Louis Art Museum will offer you a chance to find out, starting this weekend. Artist Andrea Stansislav’s new exhibit "Convergence Infinité" focuses on video captured by flying a drone equipped with a camera over the city.

The only law enforcement agency licensed by the FAA in Missouri or Illinois to operate drones uses two UASs units.
Provided by Illinois State Police

The Illinois State Police drones have flown nearly 50 missions since May, and the department says they are fulfilling the goal of making police work more efficient.

The state police was the first law enforcement agency in Illinois to get permission to use unmanned aerial surveillance vehicles. They’ve mostly been deployed at accident scenes, for a total of 48 hours of flight time.

via Flickr/Arvell Dorsey Jr

The Illinois State Police has become the first law enforcement agency in the state to get permission from the federal government to use drones.

The Federal Aviation Administration authorized the state police's unmanned aircraft system last week. The drone, which is stationed in central Illinois, is available for any department across the state to use, as long as it complies with a 2013 law that limited warrantless surveillance to emergency situations.

James Cridland via Flickr

If all goes according to plan, a surveillance drone could be policing the skies of St. Louis by this time next year. According to SLMPD Chief Sam Dotson, the drone would be used in public spaces, and would enable the police to avoid dangerous high-speed chases. But what are the legal parameters? And what is considered public?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When this session of the Missouri General Assembly came to a close in May, Democratic lawmakers and their allies wasted little time in criticizing the GOP majority for passing "extreme" bills.

Take, for example, House Minority Leader Jake Hummel. The St. Louis Democrat sent out a statement lambasting the Republican majority’s “super-extremist” agenda, including measures nullifying federal guns laws, barring implementation of a United Nations resolution called Agenda 21 and banning drones.

Blunt: Drone Document Shows Presidential Hypocrisy

Feb 6, 2013
U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo.
Senator Blunt | Flickr

U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (R-MO) says he’s troubled by a new document released this week that outlines the president’s authority to kill overseas American citizens thought to be terrorists.