economy

(via Flickr/Tracy O)

A financial blogger conference now known as #FinCon13 will be in St. Louis Thursday through Sunday.

It was founded in 2011 by blogger Philip Taylor, who also writes PT Money.

He spoke with St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman about why he wanted to bring bloggers together.

Taylor said #FinCon13 will have good attendance from the St. Louis area including some local bloggers and online entrepreneurs:

(Via Flickr/Mandalit)

Hundreds of thousands of government employees went on furlough today, as the federal government began a partial shutdown. Thousands of those employees live and work in the St. Louis region. Meanwhile the debt ceiling deadline looms.

What kind of economic impact will the shutdown and debt ceiling have on the St. Louis region?

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh spoke with economist Howard Wall, Colonel Kyle Kremer, Commander of the 375th Air Mobility Wing at Scott Air Force Base, and St. Louis Beacon reporter Jason Rosenbaum to find out.

via Flickr/KellyB.

The unemployment rate in the St. Louis area remained slightly below the national average in May, but a local economics professor says the story behind that number isn’t good news.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics released the non-adjusted data today. That means it does not take into account predictable seasonal changes.

The 7 percent unemployment rate for the St. Louis area is an improvement from May 2012, and far below the peak unemployment rate of 10.4 percent in 2009.

Erin Williams

This spring, fast food workers from across the country began banding together and rallying for better wages, fair treatment, and a healthier workplace. The movement began to swell, and in May the ‘STL Can’t Survive On 7.35’ campaign hit the region. Employees staged walkouts, passed out flyers, and marched the street in an effort to educate the public and command attention. The idea of protest may seem initially enticing, but is it worth risking your job?

(Flickr Creative Commons User Daniel Leininger)

Jobs that require at least some STEM, or science, technology, engineering and math, knowledge make up a big chunk of the St. Louis region's economy. 

That’s according to a new report from the Brookings Institution. 

Usually, researchers consider a plant scientist or electrical engineer as someone with a STEM job.

Erin Williams

After only two years of doing business in north St. Louis, the grocery store known as the Old North Grocery Co-Op may soon close down.

Store manager Jill Whitmann says re-vamping the co-op’s business model to rely primarily on volunteers will help shore up more funds before the end of May, when the budget will tighten.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

A Saint Louis University economist thinks he has found a key to growth for St. Louis.

Professor Jack Strauss presented his findings this afternoon from an economic study that shows a direct correlation between an increasing immigrant population and economic growth. The study was originally released in June.

He says he thinks it is likely that the city’s economic slump is partly due to a dwindling number of immigrants living in the area. Four and a half percent of St. Louis’ population is foreign. In other large cities, that number is closer to 18 percent.  

(via Flickr/KellyB.)

A new report shows Missouri gaining nearly 18,000 jobs last month while the state's unemployment rate held steady at 7.2 percent.

The state Department of Economic Development released the figures Tuesday. 

The agency says the net gain of 17,900 nonfarm payroll jobs from July included 4,900 jobs in manufacturing and 10,200 jobs in the government sector - nearly all of those at the local level. 

The U.S. population is growing. In normal times, the labor force — working or not — would be growing too. But these are not normal times, and the labor force is actually smaller than it was four years ago, meaning millions of people who should be there aren't.

The reasons people drop out of the workforce are myriad. People go back to school. Others have health issues or family priorities that keep them from looking for work. But some stop looking because they are discouraged.

The Planet Money team takes a look beyond the pleats, lapels and buttons of suit economics. Check it out in the graphic via the link.

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