Economy & Innovation

Business
3:38 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

'STL Can't Survive on $7.35' Campaign Continues With Rally At Jimmy John's

Olivia Roffle speaks with a woman about unfair employee treatment practices.
Erin Williams

Fast food workers and community supporters passed out flyers at Jimmy John’s in Soulard today in the continuing fight for better wages and the right to unionize as part of the STL Can’t Survive on 7.35 campaign.

The flyers were passed out in the parking lot of the restaurant around Noon and called for better managerial treatment and higher wages.

Olivia Roffle is a college student who works at another fast food restaurant. She says that if Jimmy John’s wants better service, then they need to create a welcoming environment.

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Economy
6:31 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Climate Change Prompts Renewed Interest In Native Missouri Grapes

Vitis Rupestris (Sand Grape) Vitis Riparia (Rock Grape)
Adam Allington St. Louis Public Radio

If you are a fan of wine, particularly European wines, from France, Italy or Germany, you can be proud of the role Missouri plays in creating that wine.

Ever since the mid-1800s roots from Missouri grapes have been grafted on to European varieties, because of their natural resistance to certain pests.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:04 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Broadening The Discussion: Is Raising The Minimum Wage A Good Idea?

(via Flickr/c_ambler)

Hundreds of thousands of American workers are paid the minimum wage.  It’s $7.25 nationally and $7.35 in St. Louis.  While the perception may be that minimum and low wage jobs are mostly held by teens, the vast majority, 75 percent, are adults over the age of 20.

Recent local news reports have highlighted protests by minimum wage earners.  They are demanding that their pay be nearly doubled.  The campaign is called “St. Louis Can’t Survive on $7.35.”

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Business
4:07 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

'STL Can't Survive On 7.35' Campaign Continues Rally For Change

Kenta Jackson, a shift leader at Church's Chicken, marched in solidarity with the campaign. She makes $8.50 an hour and says she doesn't receive additional pay for overtime.
Erin Williams

Fast food workers and supporters donned ponchos and held signs today as they rallied for change in the Central West End as part of the STL Can’t Survive on $7.35 campaign.

Protesters marched between Arby’s, McDonald’s, and Domino’s Pizza as they seek a pay increase for employees to $15 an hour and the right to unionize without backlash.

One of the protesters was Kenta Jackson, a shift leader at Church’s Chicken who makes $8.50 an hour. She didn’t tell her manager she wouldn’t be at work, but isn’t worried about the repercussions.

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Business
4:52 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

St. Louis Jimmy John's Workers Stage Walk-Out For Higher Wages

(via Flickr/stevendepolo)

Employees at a Jimmy John’s franchise in St. Louis’ Soulard neighborhood staged a walk-out today.

The workers are seeking $15 an hour, rather than the $7.35 minimum they currently make.

In a statement, workers also complained of being publicly disciplined for trivial incidents and forced to wear signs.

Shamniqua Clark says it was the right decision for her to take part in the walk-out.

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St. Louis on the Air
10:48 am
Wed May 1, 2013

St. Louis Regional Chamber Initiative Hopes To Translate Degrees Into Dollars

(via Flickr/j.o.h.n. walker)

The St. Louis Regional Chamber is launching a collaborative initiative to increase the percentage of the area’s workforce which has a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Thirty percent of adults in the St. Louis region have at least a bachelor’s degree, ranking it 14th among the nation’s metropolitan areas.  That’s just behind Los Angeles and ahead of Houston, according to U.S. Census estimates.  Meanwhile, decades of slow population growth place St. Louis as the 19th most populated region.

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Peabody and Patriot Coal Protests
5:33 pm
Mon April 29, 2013

Protesters Return To St. Louis As Patriot Coal Health Benefits Case Continues

Protesters rally in front of the Peabody Energy headquarters in downtown St. Louis on April 29, 2013. They gathered to draw attention to a Patriot Coal case regarding the health care benefits of 10,000 retired miners. Peabody spun off Patriot in 2007.
(Maria Altman/St. Louis Public Radio)

A motion by Patriot Coal to cut health benefits for 10,000 retired miners was heard Monday in a federal bankruptcy court in St. Louis.

More than 1,500 protesters, many with the United Mine Workers of America, rallied in downtown to draw attention to the case.

The UMWA is angry with Patriot for asking a federal bankruptcy judge to allow it to shed about $1.6 billion in liabilities.

But they also direct their anger at Peabody Energy, which spun off Patriot in 2007.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:32 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

Honoring The Legacy Of Martin Luther King, Jr. One Street At A Time

Proposed Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Legacy Park illustration at sunset, to be placed at the corner of Hamilton Avenue and Martin Luther King Boulevard
Lauer Architecture

A few years ago a St. Louis non-profit organization, Beloved Streets of America, conducted a study about streets throughout the country which bear the name of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The study found the majority of MLK streets are unsafe and crime-ridden.  Many are “located in distressed neighborhoods, considered areas where predominately poor blacks live, and viewed as places where whites and non-blacks seldom travel,” according to the organization.

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Business
3:53 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

St. Louis City, County Offering New Services For Startups

St. Louis County Executive and STL VentureWorks Travis Sheridan and Elizabeth Noonan unveil the business incubator's new sign
Credit Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis City and County have announced a new division to aid business startups and entrepreneurs.

Called “STL VentureWorks," the project is an extension of the recently-formed St. Louis Economic Development Partnership.

St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley says STL VentureWorks’ five locations will help connect startups to capital funding sources, as well as provide mentoring and training opportunities.

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Business
5:28 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Roosevelt High Students Recognized By State Treasurer For Financial Literacy Course Completion

A Roosevelt High student shakes hands with state treasurer Clint Zweifel. The students were recognized today for their completion of the Regiona Bank Financial Scholars Program.
Erin Williams

Students at Roosevelt High School were recognized for their participation in the Regional Bank Financial Scholars program. The students completed a web course that taught the basics of money management, and received certificates in an assembly that included remarks made by State Treasurer Clint Zweifel.

Zweifel, who hails from North County, feels that the program helps to not only lay a financial foundation for the present, but also teaches the benefits of making good choices for the future:

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