Economy & Innovation | St. Louis Public Radio

Economy & Innovation

News about the economy, business, and innovation happening in the St. Louis region.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Mallinckrodt name goes back to the mid-19th century as a source of St. Louis pride in commerce, chemistry and medicine. The name goes back a quarter-century as an example of chronic corporate turmoil.

Since 1982, Mallinckrodt has been bought, sold, split up and spun off. It has been reorganized, restructured, relocated and renamed. Large pieces have been acquired and divested with the regularity of customers going through turnstiles at a sports stadium.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In the midst of an economic downturn, when unemployment rates hover at 5 percent nationally, it is taking some college students in St. Louis longer to find jobs than usual.

For a few moments during finals week, Cadence Rippeto felt relieved. She finished the last exam of her senior year and stepped into a drizzly day. Then, her relief evaporated.

2008 political cartoon 300 pxls
John Sherffius | Boulder Daily Camera | St. Louis Beacon Archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Recent calls by presidential candidates for a summertime moratorium on gas taxes are misguided and misleading. Sens. John McCain and Hillary Clinton have backed a moratorium on the federal gas tax during the Memorial Day through Labor Day period.

Porcelain dolls are being sold to finance trips to visit a real baby. 300 pxls 2008
Kristen Hare | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The babies showed up on craigslist at 1:26 p.m., May 6. " ...from glowing cheeks to the tips of ten tiny toes. Arms and legs have soft baby creases and folds. He has sparkling brown eyes and brown hair and the cutest little smile.

Ameren Vice President Richard Mark shows the type of cables that are being put under ground to improve reliability.300 pixels 2008 photo
Provided by AmerenUE | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Even as AmerenUE battled a new round of power outages brought on by weekend storms, the Missouri utility giant continues to ramp up its plan to move more and more of its most vulnerable electrical lines underground.

Even as AmerenUE battled a new round of power outages brought on by weekend storms, the Missouri utility giant continues to ramp up its plan to move more and more of its most vulnerable electrical lines underground.

Underground wires

 

Photo courtesy of AmerenUE

Ameren Vice President Richard Mark shows the type of cables that are being put under ground to improve reliability.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Wachovia Corp. spent $6.9 billion to acquire A.G. Edwards; and the last thing the banking giant wants is a mass defection of brokers, who have rated higher on some customer satisfaction and broker satisfaction surveys than do Wachovia brokers.

"Whenever you buy a brokerage business, it's difficult to keep all the brokers," says Jaime Peters, who tracks big banks for the independent financial research firm Morningstar. She and other analysts note that A.G. Edwards' broker turnover rate over the years has been one of the lowest in the industry.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: There's more than a little irony that Wachovia Corp. announced its bid for A.G. Edwards around Memorial Day last year.

The acquisition marked the passing of another St. Louis headquarters and signaled the inevitable loss of jobs when two companies mate in the name of synergy.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Got a rebate? The IRS has begun sending out more than $100 billion in economic stimulus payments to 130 million U.S. households. Here's what your windfall can buy in the St. Louis region.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: America’s love-hate relationship with Wal-Mart may have reached a zenith this spring when the discount chain won its case seeking nearly half a million dollars from a former shelf-stocker left brain-damaged after a car accident.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A $50,000 cash bribe paid by an agent of Monsanto Co. to an Indonesian environmental official is at the center of a story in today's New York Times about the Justice Department's more relaxed approach toward corporate crime.

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