Employment

ChrisYunker | via Flickr

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis is planning to fill more than 200 positions over the next two years.

Most of the new positions are due to additional services the St. Louis Fed is taking on for the U.S. Treasury. Kathy Paese, executive vice president over the St. Louis Fed’s Treasury Division, said it’s something most people aren’t aware of.

"We maintain 22 different systems for them and perform a lot of different business operations for them, so much of our growth has been the result of Treasury moving additional functions to St. Louis," Paese said.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon signs an executive order  "banning the box" on state job applications at the office of the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

When Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon “banned the box” for potential state employees, the Show Me State joined a nationwide trend aimed at helping ex-offenders move back into the workforce.

His executive order would remove application questions about criminal history for most state jobs.

There are exceptions for positions where a criminal conviction is disqualifying, such as a bank examiner. “Ban the box” doesn’t necessarily mean that a person’s criminal history won’t come up in the hiring process — it just wouldn’t be placed on a job application.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay (center) signs into law the Veterans Preference Bill, giving veterans extra points on applications for city jobs. The bill was sponsored by 22nd Ward Alderman Jeffrey Boyd (right).
Katelyn Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Veterans now will get preference when they apply to work for the City of St. Louis, after Mayor Francis Slay signed the measure into law Monday.

After passing a civil service exam, veterans will be given an additional five points on their applications. Disabled veterans will get another five points on top of that, for a total of 10 points.

Job seekers attend a job held on Sept. 13
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

A large crowd of eager job-seekers lined up at St. Louis Community College - Florissant Valley  Saturday for the Urban League’s Job and Resource Fair. At least 90 companies, many with positions to fill, joined the fair, including BJC Healthcare, the Missouri Highway Patrol and St. Louis Community Credit Union.

Available jobs ranged across the spectrum of careers and education levels, from law enforcement to health care. BJC alone had a thousand jobs to fill.

Image courtesy of St. Louis Community College

By 2022, employment in the STEM fields ― science, technology, engineering and math ― is projected to grow by 12.4 percent in the St. Louis region.

That’s compared to an expected growth of only 9.2 percent for non-STEM jobs.

Those are among the estimates provided in the sixth annual State of the St. Louis Workforce Report, released this week by the St. Louis Community College.

(via Flickr/GIANTsqurl)

Disability rights advocates in St. Louis are highlighting new federal rules that aim to open more job opportunities to people with disabilities. Starting Monday, federal contractors are required to work toward a goal of 7 percent disabled employees in their workforce.

The unemployment rate for people with disabilities is about twice that of other adults.

David Newburger, co-founder of the Starkloff Disability Institute, says many employers are still hesitant to hire people with disabilities because of some common misconceptions.

For Colleen Starkloff and her husband Max, advocating for people with disabilities has always been about helping them gain independence. When they founded Paraquad in St. Louis 45 years ago, their goal was to enable people with disabilities to live independently.

St. Louis Beacon graphic | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Five years after the financial crisis triggered massive job-letting across the nation, analysts say recovery in the jobs sector has been uneven -- just as it has been in the overall economy.

"A lot depends on who you work for and what your occupation is. You don’t see much of a recovery if you have traditionally worked in lower-skilled jobs, even those that pay relatively well. Those are the jobs that are either disappearing or companies just aren’t doing any hiring,’’ said Russ Signorino, a longtime St. Louis labor analyst. “If you don’t have the education or type of experience that employers are looking for, you are really having a tough time finding work that pays middle-income wages or higher. It’s difficult for a lot of people.”

(Courtesy: Homeyer Precision Manufacturing)

The Workforce Solutions Group at St. Louis Community College released its fifth annual State of the St. Louis Workforce Report earlier this month. The report is a compilation of data from 1,200 employers and surveys of more than 180 students.

The Executive Summary states:

(via Flickr/U.S. Army Garrison, Miami)

At first glance, veterans of the post 9/11 wars and St. Louis youth in high crime neighborhoods don't have much in common. But two things unite them: both are considered at-risk and both can have a tough time finding jobs.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The good news is starting to percolate up from a still recovering economy. The Conference Board recently released its May Consumer Confidence Survey and our subjective appraisal of current economic conditions has improved over April, a trend over the past few months. This tentatively rosy outlook is matched by the Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan consumer sentiment index, which also is on the rise.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Congrats, 2013 grads!

(Pause)

Who has a job?

Emily Huck does. Huck, 22, who will graduate next weekend from the University of Missouri with a bachelor’s degree in English literature, said she is relieved to have found a job. She will be returning to St. Louis to work in business management at a fitness center.

KellyB. | Flickr

A new report shows Missouri gaining nearly 18,000 jobs last month while the state's unemployment rate held steady at 7.2 percent.

The state Department of Economic Development released the figures Tuesday. 

The agency says the net gain of 17,900 nonfarm payroll jobs from July included 4,900 jobs in manufacturing and 10,200 jobs in the government sector - nearly all of those at the local level. 

(via Gov. Nixon Official Website)

Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation offering job training incentives for military veterans returning to the private sector.

The legislation enacted Monday allows employers to be reimbursed for half the wages paid to military veterans during an on-the-job training period. Lawmakers who backed the measure said it taps into federal money to offset part of the job training costs.

Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio

A minority business advocacy group says the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District needs to do more to include minority and female workers in its projected $4.7 billion worth of upgrades over the next two decades.  

Yaphett El-Amin, executive director for the group MOKAN, says because city residents and businesses pay into MSD's sewer tax system, MSD should commit more jobs to local minority contractors.  

“We need a full commitment from MSD to support our region and help our businesses grow," El-Amin said, "to help our economy and hire our community.”

 

(Combined photos - both by UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Sen. Claire McCaskill, (D-Mo.) says she’s cautiously optimistic that management problems at Arlington National Cemetery have been solved.

The democratic senator visited the cemetery on Friday to assess changes made there following the revelation that thousands of graves were mislabeled or unmarked.

McCaskill co-sponsored a law that requires congressional oversight of the burial grounds, and requires cemetery officials to submit a grave site analysis. She says that report will be delivered December 22nd and so far, is 86 percent complete.

(via Flickr/srqpix)

This summer, fewer young people in the U.S. are employed than at any time since the government began keeping track.

On Wednesday the Bureau of Labor Statistics released a report that found just 48.8 percent of 16-to-24-year-olds had jobs in July.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman spoke with Michael Saltsman, a research fellow at the Employment Policies Institute, about what the numbers mean.

(via Flickr/Seabamirum)

The "Mancession" of 2009 is finally giving way to a "Mancovery." But the jobs picture for women is going in the opposite direction.

Check out this feature about gender asymmetry in the jobs "recovery" from our own Adam Allington. It aired on Marketplace Morning Report today.