Environmental Protection Agency

Coal Ash
5:26 pm
Tue December 23, 2014

Environmental Group: Ameren’s Labadie Landfill Plans Do Not Comply With New Federal Coal Ash Rule

In Dec. 2008, a dike collapsed at TVA's coal-fired power plant near Kingston, Tenn., releasing 1.1 billion gallons of coal ash into the Emory and Clinch rivers and covering about 300 acres of land.
Credit Tennessee Valley Authority

A local environmental group is asking state regulators to deny Ameren’s request to build a new coal ash landfill next to its Labadie power plant in Franklin County, on the basis that the landfill would not comply with new federal regulations.

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Coal Ash
2:21 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

First-Ever National Coal Ash Regs Disappoint Missouri Environmentalists

In Dec. 2008, the failure of a dike at TVA's coal-fired power plant near Kingston, Tenn., released 1.1 billion gallons of coal ash into the Emory and Clinch rivers and buried about 300 acres of land.
Credit Tennessee Valley Authority

For the first time, the byproducts of coal-fired power plants will now be subject to federal regulation.

In a state like Missouri, which generates more than 80 percent of its electricity from coal, the new standards could have significant repercussions.

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Climate Change
5:12 pm
Tue December 2, 2014

Time's Up! Comment Period Closes On EPA's Proposal to Limit Power Plant Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Missouri currently gets more than 80 percent of its electricity from coal-fired power plants like Ameren's Labadie power plant, pictured here.
Credit Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

Time has run out for the public to comment on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposal to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power plants.

The issue has been highly contentious.

By late November, the EPA had already received more than 1.6 million comments on its proposed rule. [Update: The final tally on comments? 1,913,566.]

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Clean Water Act
6:44 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

EPA Approves Missouri's New Water Quality Standards, But Do They Go Far Enough?

The Current and Jacks Fork Rivers in the Missouri Ozarks are among the most pristine in the state. The U.S. EPA has recommended that Missouri designate waters with particularly diverse or rare aquatic species as "exceptional aquatic habitat," which would provide them with a higher level of protection.
Credit National Parks Service

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has signed off on a major overhaul of Missouri's water quality standards.

The state approved the new regulations in November but needed federal approval to start enforcing them.

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St. Louis on the Air
11:20 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Environmental Activist To Address Bridgeton Landfill Concerns

Lois Gibbs holds her daughter Missy stands outside her Love Canal home in Niagara Falls, N.Y., in 1978.
Credit Courtesy of Lois Gibbs

Environmental activist Lois Gibbs will be in St. Louis this weekend for a “teach-in” to address problems at the adjoining Bridgeton and West Lake landfills, located in Bridgeton a few miles from Lambert Airport.

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EPA Carbon Rule
8:00 pm
Thu September 25, 2014

EPA Official Talks About Proposed Carbon Dioxide Limits ― And How They Could Play Out In Missouri

Credit Credit Syracuse University News Services

Earlier this summer, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first-ever rule to cut carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants.

Under the new limits, Missouri would need to reduce its emissions by about 21 percent over the next 15 years.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra spoke with EPA Regional Administrator Karl Brooks about the plan, which Brooks said is designed to give states maximum flexibility.

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Environment
8:07 pm
Wed September 24, 2014

What The EPA Has To Say About The West Lake Landfill ― And Why Everything Is Taking So Long

A temperature monitoring probe is installed at the Bridgeton Landfill on Sep. 16, 2014.
Credit Missouri Department of Natural Resources

Quite a bit of information has come out over the past month about the West Lake and Bridgeton Landfills ― some of it contradictory and confusing.

So when EPA Regional Administrator Karl Brooks offered up an interview ― about something else ― I took advantage of my time with him to try to clear up some of that confusion.

We talked about the underground fire at the Bridgeton Landfill; about the firebreak that’s supposed to keep it from reaching the radioactive waste at the adjacent West Lake Landfill; and about groundwater contamination in Bridgeton.

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Clean Air
2:32 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

EPA Official Talks Carbon Emissions With St. Louis Business Leaders

Credit (Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

The Environmental Protection Agency's proposed Clean Power Plan will be a historic milestone in the vein of the 1970’s Clean Water and Clean Air acts.

That was Karl Brooks’ message to members of the St. Louis Regional Chamber at a breakfast event Wednesday morning. Brooks is the administrator of EPA’s Region 7, which includes Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska.

The Clean Power Plan proposes cutting power plants' carbon emissions by 30 percent by the year 2030.

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Economy & Innovation
12:30 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Peabody Asks EPA To Withdraw Carbon Emissions Proposal

Credit (Veronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Peabody Energy is asking the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw its proposed carbon emission rules.

The St. Louis-based coal company took part in the EPA’s hearings on the rule Tuesday morning in Washington D.C. The agency is also holding hearings in Atlanta, Denver and Pittsburgh Tuesday and Wednesday.

The EPA’s proposed rules seek to reduce U.S. carbon dioxide emissions in the power sector by 30 percent by the year 2030.

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On a coal barge
10:10 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Collateral Impact Of The EPA's Proposed Carbon Rule: Barge Companies Are Already Adapting

Train cars of coal at ACL's St. Louis coal terminal will be dumped out and put on Louisiana-bound barges.
Credit Jess Jiang / St. Louis Public Radio

Historically, the nation's barges have transported much of the nation's coal. In fact, barges are second only behind rail for moving the nation's primary energy source to the power plants that use it.  But in June, the EPA put out a new rule to cut carbon emissions by thirty percent by 2030. The rule's impact on power plants is direct. But what about the impact on the barge industry?  

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