Eric Fey | St. Louis Public Radio

Eric Fey

Under the new law, registered voters can bring one of four IDs to the polling place: a state-issued driver’s license, a state-issued non-driver’s license, a U.S. passport or a military ID.
Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

June’s arrival heralded a new era for elections in Missouri, one in which voters are expected to show identification before filling out a ballot.

Any new law stirs up questions — especially when similar measures in other states make headlines again and again.

Rick Stream 2016
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

More than two years after narrowly losing a bid for the top job in St. Louis County government, Rick Stream is slated to become one of the most powerful elections officials in Missouri.

The St. Louis County Board of Elections Commissioners tapped Stream to serve as the Republican elections director. Two directors from each major political party are in charge of running the day-to-day operations of county elections board. But because Stream shares the same party with incoming Republican Gov. Eric Greitens, he’ll technically be in charge of the state’s largest elections jurisdiction.

St. Louis County's temporary absentee-voting office is in Maplewood's Deer Creek shopping center.
Jo Mannies | St. Louis Public Radio

With Missouri’s largest bloc of votes, St. Louis County often makes or breaks elections, determining which statewide candidates claim victory, and which ballot issues become law.

But with a St. Louis judge imposing more restrictions on absentee ballots, the impact in St. Louis County is significant – and may have statewide repercussions.

St. Louis County Board of Elections director Eric Fey was suspended without pay on Tuesday.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County elections officials say they are ready for Tuesday’s primary.

During the April municipal elections, many voters were faced with long lines when several county polling places ran out of paper ballots. County Democratic Election Director Eric Fey says that won’t happen this time.

St. Louis County Board of Elections director Gary Fuhr, right, announced his upcoming retirement at this week's Board of Election Commissioners' meeting.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County’s Republican election chief will likely retire later this year.

During this week’s meeting of the county’s Board of Election Commissioners, GOP Elections director Gary Fuhr announced that he was planning to retire. It came as commissioners mulled over whether to punish anybody for ballot shortages at more than 60 polling places earlier this month. (A Democratic director and a Republican director run the elections board. Whichever director shares the governor's party typically is in charge.)

St. Louis County Board of Elections director Eric Fey was suspended without pay on Tuesday.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners suspended its top official, a move that comes after dozens of polling places ran out of ballots during this month’s municipal elections.

After the four-person election board went into closed session on Tuesday, it voted to suspend Democratic director Eric Fey for two weeks without pay. Commissioners also suspended elections coordinator Laura Goebel without pay for one week. The board did not exert any punishment against Republican director Gary Fuhr.

Eric Fey, the Democratic director for the St. Louis County Board of Elections.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

It would be an understatement to say that Tuesday was not a good day for Eric Fey.

The Democratic director for the St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners is in charge of the largest and most complicated local electoral jurisdiction in the state. And during yesterday’s slate of municipal elections, polling places across the county ran out of paper ballots — even in the early hours of the morning. Things got so dire that a court ultimately extended voting hours — after the polls had already closed.

paper ballot voting places
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

Updated as story develops: St. Louis County’s municipal elections got off to a rocky start on Tuesday, with many polling places quickly running out of ballots. An appeals court extended voting until 9 p.m., but the decision came late. Shortly after 5 p.m., Circuit Judge Maura B. McShane denied a request to extend voting. In a hand-written order, the presiding judge in the county said "the court denies petitioners' request and doesn't believe it has authority to extend the hours."

In an email, Eric Fey, Democratic director of the St. Louis County Board of Elections, said, "Any ballots cast after 7:00 pm as a result of the court order will not be counted tonight."

Proposition B asks to voters to allow their local city or county to continue collecting sales tax on cars bought out of state
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

City voters may have noticed something new at their polling place last week. Tuesday marked the first time elections officials used iPads at every precinct to check in voters.

The city launched a pilot program in a third of its precincts in August 2014. Mary Wheeler-Jones, the Democratic director of the St. Louis Board of Election Commissioners, said they allow the city to eliminate the large binders of paper, which streamlines the check-in process.

voting booth for paper ballot
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

St. Louis Public Radio's Curious Louis was recently asked about the Village of Country Life Acres. The 2010 census lists the tiny west St. Louis County village as having 74 residents. Yet, it had 92 registered voters at the end of that year.

Ferguson Mayor James Knowles listens to public testimony on Saturday about a proposed consent decree. Knowles and the rest of the city council could vote on whether to accept the 131-page agreement on Tuesday.
File photo |Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

It’s not hyperbole to say that Tuesday’s vote on a proposed consent decree with the federal government is the biggest decision in Ferguson’s history.

The 131-page document casts a huge structural and financial shadow of a municipality still reeling from the shooting death of Michael Brown. If the Ferguson City Council votes to accept the agreement, it could deliver monumental changes to the city’s police department and government – at a hefty price tag.

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

Tuesday is Election Day for parts of St. Louis County. And while off-year elections typically don’t bring out a huge number of voters, property hike proposals in the Kirkwood and Mehlville School Districts could bring out more people than usual.

(Kirkwood School District voters will decide whether to raise property taxes by 78 cents for every $100 of assessed value. Mehlville School District residents will consider a 49 cents per $100 of assessed value property tax hike.)

Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III meets the press on Wednesday. He announced Police Chief Tom Jackson was stepping aside.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Petitioners seeking to oust controversial Ferguson Mayor James Knowles from office haven't gathered enough valid signatures to trigger a recall election.

Eric Fey, the Democratic director of elections at St. Louis County Board of Elections, told St. Louis Public Radio that petitioners had gathered 1,008 valid signatures. They needed 1,814 to trigger a recall.

(via Flickr/lowjumpingfrog)

It’s been more than two weeks since St. Louis County’s municipal elections. But the counting in some jurisdictions continues – and may not end until this summer. Two elections even ended in a tie.

The county Board of Election Commissioners is also involved in a fight in Kinloch, where some city officials are refusing to swear in the April 7 victors, including a new mayor. The victors have been planning to oust their critics.

(via Flickr/lowjumpingfrog)

Over the past 10 years since it faced two federal lawsuits, the St. Louis Board of Election Commissioners has quietly cut 75,000 people off of its voter rolls.

That represents more than a quarter of the 281, 316 voters on the city's rolls in 2004. St. Louis' voter list now totals 206,349, according to state election records.