Eric Greitens | St. Louis Public Radio

Eric Greitens

U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, a Republican from Ballwin
Ali Pardo/Wagner congressional office

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio's Jo Mannies welcomes back U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner to the program.

The Ballwin Republican represents Missouri's 2nd Congressional District, which takes in parts of St. Louis, St. Charles and Jefferson Counties. She recently filed to run for another term earlier this week.

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt is facing a tough challenge from Kander. But the closeness of the race isn't hugely surprising, given that statewide contests in Missouri are traditionally competitive.
File photo I Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt is sharply disagreeing with President Donald Trump’s bid to apply steep tariffs to steel and aluminum imports, a move that some major St. Louis companies are panning.

The Republican lawmaker also rejected the president’s suggestion that law enforcement officials take guns away from people before engaging in due process.

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley shares evidence included in a motion to dismiss Backpage's lawsuit against him.
File photo I Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is launching one probe into Gov. Eric Greitens’ activities while clearing him in another.

Hawley’s deputy chief of staff said Thursday that it is looking into the charitable activities of a nonprofit called The Mission Continues, which was set up several years ago by Greitens – before he was a candidate – to help fellow military veterans.

Gov. Greitens' booking photo from Feb. 22
St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Feb. 22, 2018

Gov. Eric Greitens’ trial on a felony invasion of privacy charge has been set for May 14.

St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison scheduled the start of the trial at a hearing Wednesday morning.

Greitens’ defense team had asked for a speedy trial, while Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner didn’t want it to begin until November, saying she she needed more time to prepare.

State Rep. Jay Barnes, left, will chair a House committee set up by  House Speaker Todd Richardson, right, to investigate the allegations that led to the indictment of Gov. Eric Greitens.
House Communications

When it comes to Gov. Eric Greitens’ legal troubles, the split among Missouri Republicans was obvious Monday during back-to-back news conferences.

Missouri House Speaker Todd Richardson, a Republican from Poplar Bluff, announced that he has set up a bipartisan committee to investigate the issues surrounding the governor’s indictment Thursday for allegedly taking a photo of a partially nude woman without her consent.

Right after the speaker’s brief event, two St. Louis area lawmakers held a rival news conference that urged the governor to resign.

Editor’s note and Feb. 28 update: One of the prosecutors in the invasion of privacy case against Gov. Eric Greitens said they do not have the photo that he allegedly took of the woman with whom he had an affair in 2015.

Media outlets reported that at a hearing on Wednesday, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Robert Steele said prosecutors are hoping to obtain the photo, although one of Greitens’ lawyers said the photo “does not exist.”

The judge set a May 14 trial date for the case. That’s a few days before the end of the 2018 Missouri legislative session.

Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

The decision by a St. Louis grand jury to indict Gov. Eric Greitens for felony invasion of privacy has raised a number of legal issues.

We’ve looked at what it means politically, and what happens next in the court process. We’ve also tried to answer some of what you want to know. Here, we try to explain some of the legalese.

File | Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Republicans are split over what to do about Gov. Eric Greitens, a fellow Republican who’s been indicted for felony invasion of privacy after allegedly taking a semi-nude photo of a woman without her consent.

The state Republican Party contends that the indictment is “a political hit job’’ engineered by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner, a Democrat. But there are increasing calls from GOP lawmakers, especially in the state Senate, for Greitens to at least consider stepping down.

File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday, a St. Louis grand jury indicted Gov. Eric Greitens for felony invasion of privacy for allegedly taking a semi-nude photo of a woman without her permission. Greitens was arrested Thursday afternoon, but was released without having to post bond.

Here’s a roundup of what’s happened so far and what’s ahead:

File Photo |Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s indictment of Gov. Eric Greitens for one count of felony invasion of privacy raises lots of questions. St. Louis Public Radio asked our social media followers on Twitter and Facebook to send their questions to us.

What You Need to Know About the Greitens Indictment

Feb 22, 2018

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was indicted Thursday evening on a charge of felony invasion of privacy. But what does that mean, and how will it affect Missouri politics?

What is an indictment?

An indictment is a legal process where a grand jury decides that the attorney prosecuting a case has enough evidence to begin basic criminal proceedings.

Gov. Greitens' booking photo from Feb. 22
St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Feb. 22, 2018

Updated Feb. 23 at 9:10 a.m. with  additional comments from Kim Gardner — A St. Louis grand jury has indicted Gov. Eric Greitens for felony invasion of privacy for allegedly taking a semi-nude photo of a woman without her permission. Greitens was arrested Thursday afternoon, but was released without having to post bond. 

One of his attorneys, Edward Dowd, said in a statement that he plans to file a motion to dismiss the charges.

“In forty years of public and private practice, I have never seen anything like this. The charges against my client are baseless and unfounded. My client is absolutely innocent,” he said.

RISE Community Development's Stephen Acree stands in one of his organization's apartments in Forest Park Southeast. His group used low-income housing and historic tax credits to redevelop a slew of buildings in the central corridor neighborhood.
File photo I Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

A question and answer panel with four Republican statewide officials was meant to showcase the party’s unprecedented consolidation of power within Missouri’s government. Instead, the Lincoln Days event pointed to a major policy division among the GOP.

That’s because Gov. Eric Greitens touted how he engineered a halt to state low-income housing tax credits in late December. He called the incentive a “scam” that had been “ripping off” Missourians for years, and received a round of applause from the audience when mentioning how he “zeroed out” the program.

Gov. Eric Greitens speaks to reporters in his office at the state Capitol in Jefferson City on January 22, 2018.
FIle photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has hired a new lawyer – former St. Louis Judge Jack Garvey – to represent him in the investigation underway by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner.

Gardner is looking into whether Greitens broke any laws during his admitted extramarital affair, which took place in 2015, more than a year before the governor was elected.

Garvey, who also is a former St. Louis alderman, confirmed Sunday to St. Louis Public Radio that he now represented the governor. Garvey said he was hired “late last week.” Garvey said he was not representing any members of the governor’s staff, some of whom apparently have been subpoenaed by Gardner’s office.

Erin Achenbach I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome Greg Razer to the program for the first time.

Razer, a Democrat, represents a portion of Kansas City in the Missouri House. He was first elected to his post in 2016, winning a primary and general election with no opposition.

Gov. Eric Greitens delivers the 2018 State of the State address in Jefferson City.
Tim Bommel I House Communications

Gov. Eric Greitens talks often about growing jobs in Missouri.

It was one of the major themes in the Republican governor’s State of the State address last month. He told members of the state House and Senate that he would continue to focus on several areas to create jobs:

“Making sure that we have the right laws on the books to be fair to family businesses, and making strategic investments in education, infrastructure, and workforce development,” Greitens said.

Yet just a few days later, the governor proposed a roughly $68 million reduction for public colleges and universities. The suggested cuts to higher education for the second year in a row drew criticism almost immediately, including from Greiten’s own party.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks with reporters in the Missouri Governor's Mansion on Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018.
File photo | Erin Achenbach I St. Louis Public Radio

Gov. Eric Greitens reiterated Thursday that his plan to cut the state’s tax will not be paired with a fuel tax increase.

The governor’s comments to members of the Missouri Press Association come as both Republicans and Democrats are getting behind the idea of raising taxes on gasoline and diesel fuel to pay for fixing the state’s roads and bridges.

File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

The Missouri Senate is weighing a bill that would revoke the governor’s ability to appoint and remove people at will from state boards and commissions.

The measure would require the governor to notify the Senate in writing of any appointments made while the legislature is not in session, bar appointees from being sworn in until the Senate has been notified, and bars the governor from withdrawing appointees if he doesn’t like their decisions as board members.

Most of Missouri's Republican statewide officials join state party chairman Todd Graves, left, during forum at state Lincoln Days festivities, held Feb. 3, 2018 in Kansas City.
Jo Mannies/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Feb. 5 at 3:55 p.m. with "St. Louis on the Air" segment – KANSAS CITY, Mo. – With federal tax cuts leading the way, some top Missouri Republicans predict they’re on a path to a stronger election-year showing than many critics have predicted.

“I expect it to be a good year for Republicans in Missouri, “ said U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, who hosted Saturday’s breakfast at the state Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Days festivities, held this year in downtown Kansas City.

“It seemed like when the tax bill passed in December, it was almost like a light switch flipped on,” Blunt explained.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens helped engineer a freeze on low-income housing tax credits. And that decision is likely to stand unless the legislature makes substantial changes to the program.
File photo I Carolina Hidaglo | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens upset a bipartisan contingent of legislators when his interim appointees made major public policy decisions.

That includes how the Republican governor and his appointees in December 2017 helped halt state low-income housing tax credits, an incentive that encourages developers to produce affordable housing for the working poor and elderly.

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